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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Muller v. Oregon (1908)
  2. Bailey v Drexel Furniture Co (1922)
  3. Dennis et al. V. U.S. (1951)
  4. Ex parte Milligan (1866)
  5. Schenck v. U.S. (1919)
  1. a The Smith Act passed in 1940 made it a crime to teach or advocate the overthrow of the U.S. government by force or violence. It also required the fingerprinting and registration of all aliens. In 1947 eleven American Communist Party members were successfully prosecuted and jailed under this act. In Dennis et al. V. U.S. the Supreme Court upheld the
    constitutionality of the Smith Act.
  2. b Supreme court ruling that upheld a ten-hour work day law for women largely on the basis of sociological data regarding the effects of long hours on the health and morals of women.
  3. c Ruled that a civilian cannot be tried in military courts while civil courts are available, 1866
  4. d Unanimously upheld the Espionage Act of 1917 which decalred that people who interfered with the war effort were subject to imprisonment; decalred that the 1rst Amendment right to freedom of speech was no absolute; free speech could be limited if its exercise presented a "clear and present danger"
  5. e dealt with the 1919 Child Labor Tax Law which gave congress the right to tax 10% of the value of companies employing children under the age of 14; the USSC found that the law violated the tenth amendment and took away a power reserved to the states

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. In deciding this case, the U.S. Supreme Court officially applied the "separate but equal doctrine" to public schools. As a result of this decision and Plessy v. Ferguson, segregation laws known as Jim Crow laws, piled up throughout the South.
  2. This U.S. Supreme Court decision upheld the constitutionality of the Sedition Act (1918) which made it a crime to speak disloyally of the U.S. government or interfere with the war effort. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. dissented in the decision, holding that the Sedition Act was a violation of freedom of speech guaranteed under the First Amendment to the Constitution.
  3. In this 5-4 ruling the Supreme Court outlawed quotas
    and ordered that Alan Bakke be admitted to medical school. But the court also upheld the principle of affirmative action, explaining that race or ethnicity could be counted as a plus in an applicant's file as long as it did "not insulate the individual from comparison with other candidates."
  4. The Supreme Court declared the Keating-Owen Child Labor
    Law unconstitutional. Keating-Owen had prohibited the shipment in interstate commerce of products made with child labor.
  5. The Court ruled that states cannot tax the federal government, i.e. the Bank of the U.S.; the phrase "the power to tax is the power to destroy"; confirmed the constitutionality of the Bank of the U.S.

5 True/False questions

  1. Northern Securities Co. v. U.S. (1904)The Smith Act passed in 1940 made it a crime to teach or advocate the overthrow of the U.S. government by force or violence. It also required the fingerprinting and registration of all aliens. In 1947 eleven American Communist Party members were successfully prosecuted and jailed under this act. In Dennis et al. V. U.S. the Supreme Court upheld the
    constitutionality of the Smith Act.

          

  2. Dartmouth College v. Woodward (1819)The Court ruled that states cannot tax the federal government, i.e. the Bank of the U.S.; the phrase "the power to tax is the power to destroy"; confirmed the constitutionality of the Bank of the U.S.

          

  3. Korematsu v. U.S (1944)Sometimes called "the sick chicken case." or Schecter poultry case Unanimously declared the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) unconstitutional on three grounds : the act delegated legislative power to the executive, there was a lack of constitutional authority for such legislation; and it sought to regulate businesses that were wholly intrastate in character, 1936

          

  4. Roe v. Wade (1973)tHE suprem court upheld a law regulating the working hours of miners because their work was so dangerous that overly long hours would increase the threat of injury.

          

  5. Holden v. Hardy (1896)tHE suprem court upheld a law regulating the working hours of miners because their work was so dangerous that overly long hours would increase the threat of injury.

          

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