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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Korematsu v. U. S.
  2. Buckley v. Valeo (1976)
  3. Wesberry v. Sanders (1963)
  4. Reynolds v. U.S.
  5. Gratz v. Bollinger
  1. a T1941--he court upheld the constitutionality of detention camps for Japanese-Americans during World War 2.
  2. b Ordered House districts to be as near equal in population as possible (extension of Baker v. Carr to Congressional districts).
  3. c a United States Supreme Court case regarding the University of Michigan undergraduate affirmative action admissions policy
  4. d 1st Amendment protects campaign spending; legislatures can limit contributions, but not how much one spends of his own money on campaigns.
  5. e a Supreme Court of the United States case that held that religious duty was not a suitable defense to a criminal indictment.

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. a United States Supreme Court case regarding the application of the Due Process Clause.
  2. 1803 established the principle of judicial review
  3. 1969--Determined that a law that proscribes advocacy of violence for political reform is constitutional if applied to speech that is not directed toward producing imminent lawlessness and is not likely to produce such action is not constitutional.
  4. 1966 ruling that upon arrest, a suspect has the right to remain silent and the right to consult with a lawyer.
  5. 1819--The Court ruled that states cannot tax the federal government, i.e. the Bank of the United States; the phrase "the power to tax is the power to destroy"; confirmed the constitutionality of the Bank of the United States.

5 True/False Questions

  1. NY Times v. U.S.Pentagon Papers case. Prior restraint was unjustified.

          

  2. Texas v. Johnson (1989)Established exclusionary rule; illegally obtained evidence cannot be used in court; Warren Court's judicial activism.

          

  3. U.S. v. LeonA United States Supreme Court decision which held that parts of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 were unconstitutional because they exceeded congressional power under the Commerce Clause and under section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution.

          

  4. Reynolds v. Simsa Supreme Court of the United States case that held that religious duty was not a suitable defense to a criminal indictment.

          

  5. U. S. v. Richard NixonA United States Supreme Court decision which held that parts of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 were unconstitutional because they exceeded congressional power under the Commerce Clause and under section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution.

          

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