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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Character
  2. Cumulative
  3. Paradox
  4. Third Person Limited Omniscient
  5. Denotation
  1. a those who carry out the action of the plot in literature. Major, minor, static, and dynamic are the types.
  2. b the literal or dictionary meaning of a word
  3. c Sentence which begins with the main idea and then expands on that idea with a series of details or other particulars
  4. d This type of point of view presents the feelings and thoughts of only one character, presenting only the actions of all remaining characters
  5. e A statement that appears to be self-contradictory or opposed to common sense but upon closer inspection contains some degree of truth or validity.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. refers to the grammatical or rhetorical framing of words, phrases, sentences, or paragraphs to give structural similarity.
  2. A work that closely imitates the style or content of another with the specific aim of comic effect and/or ridicule.
  3. the recreation of regional spoken language, such as a Southern one. Hurston uses this in Their Eyes Were Watching God.
  4. the relationship an author has toward his or her subject, and/or his or her audience
  5. The purpose of this rhetorical mode is to re-create, invent, or visually present a person, place, event, or action so that the reader can picture that being described. Sometimes an author engages all five senses.

5 True/False questions

  1. Figure of SpeechA device used to produce figurative language. Many compare dissimilar things. Examples are apostrophe, hyperbole, irony, metaphor, metonomy, oxymoron, paradox, personification, simile, synecdoche, and understatement.

          

  2. IronyA work that closely imitates the style or content of another with the specific aim of comic effect and/or ridicule.

          

  3. MoodA work that closely imitates the style or content of another with the specific aim of comic effect and/or ridicule.

          

  4. Ethical AppealWhen a writer tries to persuade the audience to respect and believe him or her based on a presentation of image of self through the text.

          

  5. Dramatic IronyIn this type of irony, facts or events are unknown to a character in a play or a piece of fiction but known to the reader, audience, or other characters in the work

          

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