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1st Q Exam Study Guide (T/F)

Eighteenth-century parliamentary leaders were less inclined than seventeenth-century English monarchs to exert control over their empire

True

The character of the royal officials in America contributed to the overall looseness of the British imperial system

True

Resistance to the British imperial authority was centered among western farmers

False

Prior to the 1760s, cooperation between colonies was not good

True

Colonial merchants proved their allegiance to the British during the 7 years war

False

In their competition for the allegiance of native tribes, the English could offer more better goods than the French

True

A "Creole" refers to a white immigrant of French descent

True

The British were more tolerant of Indian culture and Indian religions than were the French

False

The Treaty of Utrecht (1713) signaled a rare French victory over the English

False

In the aftermath pf King George's war, relations between English, French, and Iroqois in North America rapidly deteriorated

True

The Peace of Paris saw the French retain a portion of their North American holdings

False

Following the 7 years war, the British government faced huge problems of imperial organization, but at least had ample funds to deal with those problems

False

During the 7 years war the colonists evidenced an unwillingness to be taxed by parliament, but at least they were not reluctant to tax themselves

False

The Proclamation of 1763 decreed that Parliament had the right to pass laws dealing with colonies

False

The Proclamation of 1763 failed to meet even the modest expectations of the Indians

True

The Currency Act of 1764 gave the colonial legislature the power to print paper money

False

Despite the flurry of parliamentary legislation after 1763, most colonists found ways either to live with or to get around these laws

True

The Paxton Boys and the Regulators were examples of colonists who objected to the Mutiny Act of 1765

False

In general, the colonists regarded the political burden of the post-1763 imperial program to be worse than the economic burden

True

The actual economic burdens of the Stamp Act were relatively light

True

The Stamp Act was a direct attempt by Parliament to raise revenues in the colonies without the consent of the colonial legislatures

True

The Stamp Act was a parliamentary response to colonial objections to the Declaratory Act

False

When the Stamp Act was repealed, the colonists were left with no real grievances against British authority

False

The colonists largely accepted the Townshend Duties, except for the tax on tea

False

The Boston Massacre was the British response to the Boston Tea Party

False

The Boston Massacre was followed by three years of relative peace and quiet

True

Parliament and the colonial legislatures did not always see eye to eye, but at least they shared a similar understanding about the nature of representative government

False

Massachusetts' extensive tavern system contributed to the colony's Revolutionary activity

True

The Tea Act of 1773 actually reduced the price the tea to colonial consumers

True

The Tea Act of 1773 angered colonial consumers, but no colonial merchants

False

The Coercive Acts were first a response to the Boston Massacre

False

More people were killed in the Boston Tea Party than in the Boston Massacre

False

The Coercive Acts succeeded in isolating Massachusetts as the source of colonial discontent

False

The First Continental Congress convened before the events at Lexington and Concord in April 1775

True

The Conciliatory Propositions (1775) proposed that the colonists not be taxed by Parliament, but rather tax themselves at Parliament's demand

True

The British move on Lexington and Concord in April 1775 was designed to provoke a major battle and end the war before it could really begin

False

Both Congress, under the Articles of Confederation, and the various state legislature had the power to tax individual Americans

False

The Battle of Saratoga (1777) was both a turning point in the Revolutionary War and a victory for the colonists

True

The United States never negotiated a formal alliance with France during the Revolutionary War

False

For some African Americans, the Revolution meant an increased exposure to the concept of liberty

True

Women, sometimes by choice, but more often by necessity, flocked to the camps of the Patriot armies during the Revolutionary War

True

New state constitutions drafted during the Revolutionary War sought to expand the power of the executive

False

Thomas Jefferson had a deep moral misgivings about slavery, but he could not envision any alternative to it

True

The Articles of Confederation could not be amended until all thirteen state legislatures approved

True

The Northwest Ordinance guaranteed freedom of religion and banned slavery

True

Like Bacon's Rebellion, Shays's Rebellion occurred in Virginia

False

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