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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. "The Silent Majority"
  2. Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique
  3. Military Spending
  4. Social Security Act
  5. Maquiladora
  1. a massive spending went to defense forces to keep the communists out of the United States and other allied countries
  2. b The original Social Security Act[1] (1935) and the current version of the Act, as amended[2] encompass several social welfare and social insurance programs. The larger and better known programs are: Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance, Unemployment Benefits, Temporary help for needy families, Health Insurance for Aged and Disabled, Grants for Medical Assistance Programs, Children's Health Insurance, Supplemental Security Income
  3. c unspecified large majority of people in a country or group who do not express their opinions publicly. The term was popularized (though not first used) by U.S. President Richard Nixon in a November 3, 1969 speech,[1] where it referred to those Americans who did not join in the large demonstrations against the Vietnam War at the time, who did not join in the counterculture, and who did not enthusiastically participate in public discourse or the media. Nixon along with many others saw this group as being overshadowed by the more vocal minority.
  4. d an assembly plant in Mexico (near the United States border)
  5. e A leading figure in the "Second Wave" of the U.S. Women's Movement, her 1963 book The Feminine Mystique is sometimes credited with sparking the "second wave" of feminism. Friedan cofounded National Organization for Women in 1966 which aimed to bring women "into the mainstream of American society now [in] fully equal partnership with men". She also wrote the book Our Wayward Sons.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. concrete barrier built by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) that completely enclosed the city of West Berlin, separating it from East Germany, including East Berlin. The Wall included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the "death strip") that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses.
  2. The federal economic polices of the Reagan administration, elected in 1981. These policies combined a monetarist fiscal policy, supply-side tax cuts, and domestic budget cutting. Their goal was to reduce the size of the federal government and stimulate economic growth.
  3. 1972; Nixon feared loss so he approved the Commission to Re-Elect the President to spy on and espionage the Democrats. A security gaurd foiled an attempt to bug the Democratic National Committe Headquarters, exposing the scandal. Seemingly contained, after the election Nixon was impeached and stepped down
  4. Republican Rutherford B. Hayes over democrat Samuel J. Tiden was awarded the White House on the understanding that he would remove federal troops that were placing republican governments in the South
  5. series of impromptu exchanges (through interpreters) between then U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev at the opening of the American National Exhibition at Sokolniki Park in Moscow on July 24, 1959. For the exhibition, an entire house was built that the American exhibitors claimed anyone in America could afford. It was filled with labor-saving and recreational devices meant to represent the fruits of the capitalist American consumer market.

5 True/False questions

  1. Atomic BombThe phrase "Women's Liberation" was first used in the United States in 1964 and first appeared in print in 1966.[28][29] By 1968, although the term Women's Liberation Front appeared in the magazine Ramparts, it was starting to refer to the whole women's movement.[30] Bra-burning also became associated with the movement, though the actual prevalence of bra-burning is debatable

          

  2. GI Billused to coagulate gasoline into a gelatine for military uses. Developed by Harvard chemists, headed by Louis Fieser, the thickener's name, napalm, derives from the first letters of the names of the thickeners, coprecipitated aluminium salts of naphthenic and palmitic acids. Currently, napalm is the generic name denoting several flammable liquids used in warfare, often jellied gasoline

          

  3. Lynch Lawused to coagulate gasoline into a gelatine for military uses. Developed by Harvard chemists, headed by Louis Fieser, the thickener's name, napalm, derives from the first letters of the names of the thickeners, coprecipitated aluminium salts of naphthenic and palmitic acids. Currently, napalm is the generic name denoting several flammable liquids used in warfare, often jellied gasoline

          

  4. Fiscal Conservatismpolitical term used in North America to describe a fiscal policy that advocates a reduction in overall government spending. Fiscal conservatives often consider deficit and national debt reduction as well as balancing the federal budget of paramount importance. Free trade, deregulation of the economy, lower taxes, and other neoliberal policies are also often affiliated with fiscal conservatism

          

  5. John Maynard KeynesIn the 1930s, Keynes spearheaded a revolution in economic thinking, overturning the older ideas of neoclassical economics that held that free markets would automatically provide full employment as long as workers were flexible in their wage demands. Following the outbreak of World War II Keynes's ideas concerning economic policy were adopted by leading Western economies.

          

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