Grammar Week 1 TEAS

24 terms by lextisy

Create a new folder

Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads

Sentence

group of words that contains a subject and at least one action word (verb).

Subject

what or whom the sentence is about.
-Can be implied as you.
-Doesn't have to be at beginning
-can have more than one subject in a sentence

Predicate

contains the action word (verb) that tells what the subject is or does.
Example: The cardiologist STRUGGLED TO EXPLAIN WHAT HAD LED HIM TO SELECT HIS CHOSEN PROFESSION.
-Struggle is main verb, and the rest of the predicate words tell about the main verb.

Noun

Person, place or thing.

Pronoun
3 cases

Small words that take the place of nouns. Three forms:
-Nominative: subject or follows to be
-Objective- "on receiving end"
-Possessive- ownership (mine, his, yours, hers)

Indefinite Pronoun

You cannot tell what it refers to.
Example: Jill's appointment with montana was at noon, but she was running late.
Who was running late??

Verb
3 rules

Action or condition of the subject.
1. Verb must agree in number with subject
2. Verb must be in correct tense (now, then, tomorrow, or soon)
3. Verbs can be regular and irregular in the way they form different sentences. Irregular verbs- Change their spelling when they change their tense.

Past Participle

form of a verb that is used with the helping verb "has" or "have"

Test strategies:

Circle verb/noun if asking for adverb or adjective
Remember that "not" is considered an adverb
Watch for past/present verb/subject agreement.

Give the Past and Past Participle of the following irregular verbs:
begin
break
choose
do
eat
fly
go
know

PICTURE

Give the Past and Past Participle of the following irregular verbs:
Lie
rise
see
shake
speak
take
write

PICTURE

Give the Objective and Possessive case of the following pronouns:
I
you
he
she
it
we
they

...

Phrase

lacks a subject and a verb
Example: to the store. in the street.

Prepositional Phrase

start with prepositions. Common ones are: about after against among around behind below beneath between beyond despite during from in of throughout to underneath until with without.

Participle phrase

contains a participle but not a subject. When a participle phrase modifies a sentence, it is separated from the rest of the sentence by a comma. For example: Pleased by the doctor's complimentary words, the nurse smiled.

Clause

a clause is a sentence that contains a subject and a verb. Clauses come in several forms: independent, dependent, adverb, adjective, and a noun.

Independent clause

can stand on its own as a sentence. It has a subject and a verb and makes a complete thought.

Dependent clauses

depends on other words to be added to it to make sense. Example: Until the third shift comes on duty.

Adverbial Clause

clause that modifies a verb. Can be at the beginning or end of a sentence.
Example: Dr. Car wanted to retire early BECAUSE A HOUSE ON THE OCEAN WAS WAITING FOR HIM

Adjectival Clause

Dependent clause that modifies a noun or pronoun.
EXAMPLE: It never rains on the days WHEN I FIND A DECENT PARKING SPACE.
Look for the literal words: who what where when why and to what extent.

Fragments

no matter how much additional info added, it is still incomplete because it doesn't have a subject and a verb.

Run on Sentence Definition

Two equal independent clauses, each having their own subject and verb with
1. no and or but to link or separate the clauses
2. the punctuation between them is either missing or incorrect.

What is wrong with the following sentences:
1. The hospital cafeteria has all new specials this week on Monday it is going to be Salisbury steak.
2. The new cardiac equipment has finally arrived, the doctors plan to get it into place by the end of the month.

1. word "and" is missing
2. only a comma has been inserted between the two clauses

How to fix a run on sentence: 4 different ways

1. Put period between two independent clauses
2. Put a semicolon between the two independent clauses
3. Add and or but to link the two clauses. This words used to link independent clauses are called coordinating conjunctions and they create a compound sentence.
4. Use a subordinate conjunction (although, after, because, ect.) to introduce one or two clauses. This creates a complex sentence.

Please allow access to your computer’s microphone to use Voice Recording.

Having trouble? Click here for help.

We can’t access your microphone!

Click the icon above to update your browser permissions above and try again

Example:

Reload the page to try again!

Reload

Press Cmd-0 to reset your zoom

Press Ctrl-0 to reset your zoom

It looks like your browser might be zoomed in or out. Your browser needs to be zoomed to a normal size to record audio.

Please upgrade Flash or install Chrome
to use Voice Recording.

For more help, see our troubleshooting page.

Your microphone is muted

For help fixing this issue, see this FAQ.

Star this term

You can study starred terms together

NEW! Voice Recording

Create Set