Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads

The major factor in drawing country people off the farms and into the big cities was the
a. development of the skyscraper.
b. availability of industrial jobs.
c. compact nature of those large communities.
d. advent of new housing structures known as dumbbell tenements.
e. lure of cultural excitement.

b. availability of industrial jobs.

The development of electric trolleys in the late nineteenth century transformed the American city by
a. ending horse-drawn transportation in the city.
b. enabling cities to build upward as well as outward.
c. separating the mass transportation of the working class from the private vehicles of the wealthy.
d. enabling cities to plan streets along regular grid lines.
e. creating distinct districts devoted to residential neighborhoods, commerce, and industry.

b. enabling cities to build upward as well as outward.

One of the early symbols of the dawning era of consumerism in urban America was
a. mass-production factories.
b. the Sears catalog.
c. advertising billboards.
d. public transportation systems.
e. large department stores.

e. large department stores.

Which one of the following has the least in common with the other four?
a. Slums
b. Dumbbell tenements
c. Bedroom communities
d. Flophouses
e. The "Lung Block"

c. Bedroom communities

The two immigrant ethnic groups who were most harshly treated in the mid to late nineteenth century were the
a. Spanish and Greeks.
b. Irish and Chinese.
c. Germans and Swedes.
d. Japanese and Filipinos.
e. French and Russians.

b. Irish and Chinese.

Most Italian immigrants to the United States between 1880 and 1920 came to escape
a. political oppression.
b. famine.
c. the political disintegration of their country.
d. the military draft.
e. the poverty and backwardness of southern Italy.

e. the poverty and backwardness of southern Italy.

By the late nineteenth century, most of the Old Immigrant groups from northern and Western Europe
a. actively promoted the idea of a multicultural America.
b. were still regarded with suspicion and hostility by the majority of native Americans.
c. had largely abandoned their ethnically based churches, clubs, and neighborhoods.
d. were largely accepted as American, even though they often lived in separate ethnic neighborhoods.
e. still maintained a primary loyalty to their country of origin, especially Ireland or Germany.

d. were largely accepted as American, even though they often lived in separate ethnic neighborhoods.

New Immigrant groups were regarded with special hostility by many nativist Americans because
a. most Americans considered Italian, Greek, or Jewish culture inferior to their own.
b. many New Immigrants attempted to convert Americans to Catholicism, Orthodox Christianity, or Judaism.
c. in many New Immigrant families, women were kept in distinctly subordinate roles.
d. New Immigrants were often more politically loyal to their homelands than to the United States.
e. their religions were distinctly different and some New Immigrants were politically radical.

a. most Americans considered Italian, Greek, or Jewish culture inferior to their own.

Prominent Protestant pastors like Walter Rauschenbusch and Washington Gladden argued that
a. the ancient Bible should be replaced by more modern scientific sociology and social theory.
b. the Christian Gospel required that churches address poverty and other burning social issues of the day.
c. the churches were in danger of being taken over by anti-intellectual fundamentalism.
d. it was up to women to lead the church in an age of industrial democracy.
e. the clergy should become the advance guard of a militant working class revolution.

b. the Christian Gospel required that churches address poverty and other burning social issues of the day.

The Darwinian theory of organic evolution through natural selection affected American religion by
a. turning most scientists against religion.
b. creating a split between religious conservatives who denied evolution and accomodationists who supported it.
c. raising awareness of the close spiritual kinship between animals and human beings.
d. causing a revival of the doctrine of original sin.
e. sparking the rise of new denominations based on modern science.

a. turning most scientists against religion.

Besides serving immigrants and the poor in urban neighborhoods, settlement workers like Jane Addams and Florence Kelley
a. actively lobbied for social reforms like anti-sweatshop laws and child labor laws.
b. created the new, largely female profession of teaching.
c. looked down on the immigrant populations they served.
d. saw themselves primarily as feminists who worked to advance women's causes.
e. steered clear of controversial international questions like war and peace.

a. actively lobbied for social reforms like anti-sweatshop laws and child labor laws.

Settlement houses, such as Hull House, engaged in all of the following activities except
a. child care.
b. instruction in English.
c. cultural activities.
d. evangelical religious instruction.
e. lobbying for social reform.

d. evangelical religious instruction.

Labor unions favored immigration restriction because most immigrants were all of the following except
a. opposed to factory labor.
b. used as strikebreakers.
c. willing to work for lower wages.
d. difficult to unionize.
e. non-English speaking.

a. opposed to factory labor.

The two major sources of funding for the powerful new American research universities were
a. tuition paid by undergraduate students and fees charged to those served by the universities.
b. state land grants and wealthy, philanthropic industrialists.
c. the federal government and local communities.
d. income from successful patents and corporate research grants.
e. churches and numerous private individual donors.

b. state land grants and wealthy, philanthropic industrialists.

The pragmatists were a school of American philosophers who emphasized
a. the provisional and fallible nature of knowledge and the value of ideas that solved problems.
b. that ideas were largely worthless and only practical experience should be pursued.
c. that the traditional Greek ideals of Plato and Aristotle should be revived.
d. that scientific experimentation provided a new and absolutely certain basis for knowledge.
e. that most academic knowledge was based on bourgeois ideas that oppressed the working class.

a. the provisional and fallible nature of knowledge and the value of ideas that solved problems.

Booker T. Washington believed that the key to political and civil rights for African Americans was
a. the vote.
b. rigorous academic training.
c. the rejection of accommodationist attitudes.
d. to directly challenge white supremacy.
e. economic independence and education

e. economic independence and education

Black leader, Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois
a. demanded complete equality for African Americans.
b. established an industrial school at Tuskegee, Alabama.
c. supported the goals of Booker T. Washington.
d. was an ex-slave who rose to fame.
e. None of these

a. demanded complete equality for African Americans.

The two late-nineteenth-century newspaper publishers whose competition for circulation fueled the rise of sensationalistic yellow journalism were
a. Horatio Alger and Harlan E. Halsey.
b. Henry Adams and Henry James.
c. Henry George and Edward Bellamy.
d. William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer.
e. Edwin L. Godkin and Stephen Crane.

d. William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer.

Edward Bellamy's novel, Looking Backward, inspired numerous late-nineteenth-century social reformers by
a. demonstrating that women's work in the home was seriously undervalued.
b. showing how a single tax on land speculation would end poverty.
c. portraying the sufferings of an immigrant worker in Chicago's stockyard meat industry.
d. showing the hypocrisy of the urban wealthy.
e. portraying a utopian America in the year 2000, where nationalized industry had solved all social problems.

e. portraying a utopian America in the year 2000, where nationalized industry had solved all social problems.

Which of the following prominent post-Civil War writers did not reflect the increased attention to social problems by those from less affluent backgrounds?
a. Mark Twain
b. William Dean Howells
c. Stephen Crane
d. Kate Chopin
e. Henry Adams

e. Henry Adams

In the course of the late nineteenth century
a. the birthrate increased.
b. the divorce rate fell.
c. family size gradually declined.
d. people tended to marry at an earlier age.
e. children were seen as a greater economic asset.

e. children were seen as a greater economic asset.

By 1900, advocates of women's suffrage
a. acknowledged that women were biologically weaker than men but claimed that they deserved the vote anyway.
b. temporarily abandoned the movement for the vote.
c. formed strong alliances with African Americans seeking voting rights.
d. argued that the vote would enable women to extend their roles as mothers and homemakers to the public world.
e. insisted on the inherent political and moral equality of men and women.

d. argued that the vote would enable women to extend their roles as mothers and homemakers to the public world.

One of the most important factors leading to an increased divorce rate in the late nineteenth century was the
a. decline in farm income.
b. stresses of urban life.
c. emerging feminist movement.
d. passage of more liberal divorce laws.
e. decline of religious organizations.

b. stresses of urban life.

Reflecting women's increasing independence in the late 1890s, author and feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman supported all of the following except
a. women abandoning their dependent status.
b. women seeking power via their roles as wives and mothers.
c. notions that biology made women fundamentally different from men.
d. centralized nurseries and cooperative kitchens.
e. women becoming productive members of the economy as workers.

c. notions that biology made women fundamentally different from men.

The National American Woman Suffrage Association
a. achieved its central political goal in 1898.
b. conducted an integrated campaign for equal rights.
c. abandoned the goals of Susan Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
d. elected Ida B. Wells as its president.
e. limited its membership to whites.

e. limited its membership to whites.

Please allow access to your computer’s microphone to use Voice Recording.

Having trouble? Click here for help.

We can’t access your microphone!

Click the icon above to update your browser permissions above and try again

Example:

Reload the page to try again!

Reload

Press Cmd-0 to reset your zoom

Press Ctrl-0 to reset your zoom

It looks like your browser might be zoomed in or out. Your browser needs to be zoomed to a normal size to record audio.

Please upgrade Flash or install Chrome
to use Voice Recording.

For more help, see our troubleshooting page.

Your microphone is muted

For help fixing this issue, see this FAQ.

Star this term

You can study starred terms together

NEW! Voice Recording

Create Set