Chapter 6 Questions

61 terms by LouieJoy

Create a new folder

Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads

What are two ways that sexual reproduction helps create and maintain genetic diversity?

Independent assortment of chromosomes during meiosis and random assortment of gametes.

Which does sexual reproduction create, new alleles or new combinations of alleles?

...

How is the production of unique genetic combinations an advantage to organisms and species?

Certain traits allow some to survive better than others.

Are chromosomes in a duplicated or an unduplicated state when crossing over occurs?

...

If genes A and B are located on separate, non-homologous chromosomes, will they follow Mendel's law of independent assortment? Explain.

...

What are the two major groups of cell types in the human body?

...

Where are gametes located?

...

How many chromosomes are in a typical human body cell?

...

What is the sex of a person with two X chromosomes?

...

Which chromosome carries the fewest number of genes?

...

What happens to the nuclei of the egg and sperm during fertilization?

...

What type of cells are haploid?

...

What is the haploid chromosome number in humans?

...

How many autosomes are present in each human gamete? How many sex chromosomes?

...

What are homologous chromosomes?

...

The word soma means "body." How does this relate to the meanings of
autosome and somatic cell?

...

After a chromosome is replicated, each half is called a ___________.

...

Two chromosomes that are very similar and carry the same genes are called ___________.

...

During which phase do homologous chromosomes separate?

...

During which phase do sister chromatids separate?

...

What does a sperm cell contribute to an embryo?

...

What does an egg contribute to an embryo?

...

Where are polar bodies made, in the male or in the female?

...

Genesis comes from a Greek word that means "to be born." How does this relate to the meaning of gametogenesis?

...

What is a polar body?

...

What is genetics?

...

Whose early work is the basis for much of our current understanding of genetics?

...

How did Mendel's views on inheritance differ from the views of many scientists of his time?

...

Why did Mendel use pea plants?

...

Mendel concluded that traits are inherited as "discrete units." What do we call these discrete units today?

...

What two conclusions make up Mendel's law of segregation?

...

Segregation means "separation." What is "segregated" in Mendel's law of segregation?

...

What does "purebred" mean?

...

What is the relationship between a gene and a protein?

...

What is an allele?

...

What term describes a pair of alleles that are the same? that are different?

...

Write a definition of homologous chromosomes using the terms "gene" and "allele."

...

Write an analogy to show the difference between genotype and phenotype.

...

How are alleles represented on paper?

...

If an organism has a recessive trait, can you determine its genotype for that trait?

...

What factors besides alleles affect phenotype?

...

What type of alleles are present in an organism with a QQ genotype?

...

What is an alternative form of a gene?

...

What is the opposite of homozygous? of dominant?

...

Why does each parent contribute only one allele to the offspring?

...

You know a ratio is a comparison that tells how two or more things relate. What is a genotypic ratio? a phenotypic ratio?

...

What is the genotypic ratio of the offspring in Figure 5.3?

...

What is the phenotypic ratio of the offspring in Figure 5.3?

...

What is a dihybrid cross?

...

Why does each parent organism in the F1 generation have four alleles listed in Figure 5.5?

...

Suppose an organism had the genotype AABb. What two types of gametes could result from this allele combination?

...

What is the phenotypic ratio that results from a dihybrid cross between two organisms that are heterozygous for both traits? See Figure 5.5 for help.

...

Probability predicts the _______________ number of occurrences, not the _______________ number of occurrences.

...

To calculate the probability that two independent events will happen together,
_______________ the probability of each individual event.

...

In Figure 5.6, the probability of getting one coin that is heads up and one coin that is tails up is _______________.

...

What is a testcross?

...

What is independent in the law of independent assortment?

...

If genes A and B are located at opposite ends on the same chromosome, are they likely to follow Mendel's law of independent assortment? Explain.

...

If genes A and B are located very close together on the same chromosome, are they likely to follow Mendel's law of independent assortment? Explain.

...

The exchange of chromosome segments between homologous chromosomes is called _________.

...

The tendency for two genes that are located close together on a chromosome to be inherited together is called _________.

...

Please allow access to your computer’s microphone to use Voice Recording.

Having trouble? Click here for help.

We can’t access your microphone!

Click the icon above to update your browser permissions above and try again

Example:

Reload the page to try again!

Reload

Press Cmd-0 to reset your zoom

Press Ctrl-0 to reset your zoom

It looks like your browser might be zoomed in or out. Your browser needs to be zoomed to a normal size to record audio.

Please upgrade Flash or install Chrome
to use Voice Recording.

For more help, see our troubleshooting page.

Your microphone is muted

For help fixing this issue, see this FAQ.

Star this term

You can study starred terms together

NEW! Voice Recording

Create Set