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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Blockbusting
  2. Urban Sprawl
  3. Gentrification
  4. Spaces of consumption
  5. Mesopotamia
  1. a Unrestricted growth in many American urban areas of housing, commercial development, and roads over large expanses of land, with little concern for urban planning.
  2. b Region of great cities (e.g Ur and Babylon) located between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers; chronically the first urban hearth dating to 3500 BCE, and which was founded in the Fertile Crescent.
  3. c Areas of a city, the main purpose of which is to encourage people to consume goods and services' driven primarily by the global media industry.
  4. d Rapid change in the racial composition of residential blocks in American cities that occurs when real estate agents and others stir up fears of neighborhood decline after encouraging people of color to move to previously white neighborhoods. In the resulting outmigration, real estate agents profit through the turnover of properties.
  5. e The rehabilitation of deteriorated, often abandoned, housing of low-income inner-city residents.

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. Outlined by a group of architects, urban planners, and developers from over 20 countries, an urban design that calls for development, urban revitalization, and suburban reforms that create walkable neighborhoods with a diversity of housing and jobs.
  2. Chronologically the fifth hearth, dating to 2000 BCE
  3. The entire built-up, nonrural area and its population, including the most recently constructed suburban appendages. Provides a better picture of the dimensions and population of such an area than the delimited municipality (central city) that forms its heart.
  4. The transformation of an area of a city into an area attractive to residents and tourists alike in terms of economic activity.
  5. a term introduced by american journalist joel garreau in order to describe the shifting focus of urbanization in the united states away from the central business district (CBD) toward the loci of economic activity at the urban fringe (extensive amounts of office and retail space, frew residential areas, modern buildings, less than 30 years old)

5 True/False Questions

  1. Urban MorphologyA spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).

          

  2. McGee modelDeveloped by geographer T.G. McGee, a model showing similar land-use patterns among the medium-sized cities of Southeast Asia.

          

  3. world cityDominant city in terms of its role in the global political economy. Not the world's biggest city in terms of population or industrial output, but rather centers of strategic control of the world economy.

          

  4. CityThe internal physical attributes about a place, including its absolute location, its spatial character and physical setting.

          

  5. Disamenity SectorThe very poorest parts of cities that in extreme cases are not even connected to regular city services and are controlled by gangs or drug lords.

          

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