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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Urban
  2. Central Business District (CBD)
  3. Concentric zone model
  4. Shantytowns
  5. Blockbusting
  1. a A structural model of the American central city that suggests the existence of five concentric land-use rings arranged around a common center.
  2. b The downtown heart of a central city, the CBD is marked by high land values, a concentration of business and commerce and the clustering of the tallest buildings
  3. c Unplanned slum development on the margins of cities, dominated by crude dwellings and shelters made mostly of scrap wood, iron, and even pieces of cardboard.
  4. d The entire built-up, nonrural area and its population, including the most recently constructed suburban appendages. Provides a better picture of the dimensions and population of such an area than the delimited municipality (central city) that forms its heart.
  5. e Rapid change in the racial composition of residential blocks in American cities that occurs when real estate agents and others stir up fears of neighborhood decline after encouraging people of color to move to previously white neighborhoods. In the resulting outmigration, real estate agents profit through the turnover of properties.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. a term introduced by american journalist joel garreau in order to describe the shifting focus of urbanization in the united states away from the central business district (CBD) toward the loci of economic activity at the urban fringe (extensive amounts of office and retail space, frew residential areas, modern buildings, less than 30 years old)
  2. The rehabilitation of deteriorated, often abandoned, housing of low-income inner-city residents.
  3. The internal physical attributes about a place, including its absolute location, its spatial character and physical setting.
  4. A discriminatory real estate practice in North America in which members of minority groups are prevented from obtaining money to purchase homes or property in predominantly white neighborhoods. The practice derived its name from the red lines depicted on cadastral maps used by real estate agents and developers. Today, redlining is officially illegal.
  5. Areas of a city, the main purpose of which is to encourage people to consume goods and services' driven primarily by the global media industry.

5 True/False questions

  1. gated communitiesRestricted neighborhoods or subdivisions, often literally fenced in, where entry is limited to residents and their guests. Although predominantly high-income based, in North America gated communities are increasingly a middle-class phenomenon.

          

  2. Sunbelt phenomenonThe movement of millions of Americans from northern and northeastern States to the South and Southwest regions of the US

          

  3. Primate cityA country's largest city-ranking atop the urban hierarchy-most expressive of the national culture and usually (but not always) the capital as well.

          

  4. MesoamericaRegion of great cities (e.g Ur and Babylon) located between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers; chronically the first urban hearth dating to 3500 BCE, and which was founded in the Fertile Crescent.

          

  5. new urbanismOutlined by a group of architects, urban planners, and developers from over 20 countries, an urban design that calls for development, urban revitalization, and suburban reforms that create walkable neighborhoods with a diversity of housing and jobs.

          

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