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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Social Stratification
  2. Agricultural Surplus
  3. Urban Realm
  4. Suburbanization
  5. Urban
  1. a Movement of upper and middle-class people from urban core areas to the surrounding outskirts to escape pollution as well as deteriorating social conditions (perceived and actual). In North America, the process began in the early nineteenth century and became a mass phenomenon by the second half of the twentieth century.
  2. b The entire built-up, nonrural area and its population, including the most recently constructed suburban appendages. Provides a better picture of the dimensions and population of such an area than the delimited municipality (central city) that forms its heart.
  3. c A spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).
  4. d one of two components, together with agricultural surplus, which enables the formation of cities; the differentiation of society into classes based on wealth, power, production, and prestige
  5. e One of two components, together with social stratification, that enables the formation of cities; agricultural production in excess of that which the producer needs for his or her own sustenance and that of his or her family and which is then sold for consumption by others.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Chronologically the second urban hearth, dating to 3200 BCE
  2. The downtown heart of a central city, the CBD is marked by high land values, a concentration of business and commerce and the clustering of the tallest buildings
  3. Outlined by a group of architects, urban planners, and developers from over 20 countries, an urban design that calls for development, urban revitalization, and suburban reforms that create walkable neighborhoods with a diversity of housing and jobs.
  4. The focal point of ancient Roman life combining the functions of the ancient Greek acropolis and agora
  5. Restricted neighborhoods or subdivisions, often literally fenced in, where entry is limited to residents and their guests. Although predominantly high-income based, in North America gated communities are increasingly a middle-class phenomenon.

5 True/False questions

  1. Concentric zone modelDeveloped by geographer T.G. McGee, a model showing similar land-use patterns among the medium-sized cities of Southeast Asia.

          

  2. Primate cityA country's largest city-ranking atop the urban hierarchy-most expressive of the national culture and usually (but not always) the capital as well.

          

  3. Functional ZonationThe transformation of an area of a city into an area attractive to residents and tourists alike in terms of economic activity.

          

  4. Sunbelt phenomenonA spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).

          

  5. ShantytownsUnplanned slum development on the margins of cities, dominated by crude dwellings and shelters made mostly of scrap wood, iron, and even pieces of cardboard.

          

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