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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. new urbanism
  2. Concentric zone model
  3. Huang He (Yellow) and Wei (Yangtzi)
  4. Commercialization
  5. Shantytowns
  1. a Unplanned slum development on the margins of cities, dominated by crude dwellings and shelters made mostly of scrap wood, iron, and even pieces of cardboard.
  2. b Outlined by a group of architects, urban planners, and developers from over 20 countries, an urban design that calls for development, urban revitalization, and suburban reforms that create walkable neighborhoods with a diversity of housing and jobs.
  3. c Rivers in present-day China; it was at the confluence of the Huang He and Wei Rivers where chronologically the fourth urban hearth was established around 1500 BCE
  4. d A structural model of the American central city that suggests the existence of five concentric land-use rings arranged around a common center.
  5. e The transformation of an area of a city into an area attractive to residents and tourists alike in terms of economic activity.

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. Area of a city with a relatively uniform land use
  2. Literally "high point of the city." The upper fortified part of a ancient Greek city, usually devoted to religious purposes.
  3. Theory proposed by Walter Christaller that explains how and where central places in the urban hierarchy should be functionally and spatially distributed with respect to one another.
  4. The innovation of the city, which occurred independently in five separate hearths
  5. A spatial generalization of the large, late-twentieth-century city in the United States. It is shown to be a widely dispersed, multicentered metropolis consisting of increasingly independent zones or realms, each focused on its own suburban downtown; the only exception is the shrunken central realm, which is focused on the Central Business District (CBD).

5 True/False Questions

  1. BlockbustingA discriminatory real estate practice in North America in which members of minority groups are prevented from obtaining money to purchase homes or property in predominantly white neighborhoods. The practice derived its name from the red lines depicted on cadastral maps used by real estate agents and developers. Today, redlining is officially illegal.

          

  2. Zoning lawsLegal restrictions on land use that determine what types of building and economic activities are allowed to take place in certain areas. In the United States, areas are most commonly divided into separate zones of residential, retail, or industrial use.

          

  3. Rank-sized RuleIn a model urban hierarchy, the idea that the population of a city or town will be inversely proportional to its rank in the hierarchy

          

  4. gated communitiesa term introduced by american journalist joel garreau in order to describe the shifting focus of urbanization in the united states away from the central business district (CBD) toward the loci of economic activity at the urban fringe (extensive amounts of office and retail space, frew residential areas, modern buildings, less than 30 years old)

          

  5. redliningDominant city in terms of its role in the global political economy. Not the world's biggest city in terms of population or industrial output, but rather centers of strategic control of the world economy.

          

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