NAME

Question Types


Start With


Question Limit

of 42 available terms

Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads

5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Slapstick comedy
  2. dramatic question
  3. satyr play
  4. parados
  5. Symbolist movement
  1. a A kind of farce, featuring pratfalls, pie throwing, fisticuffs, and other violent action. It takes its name originally from the slapstick carried by the main servant type.
  2. b type of Greek comic play that was one of the four parts of the traditional tetralogy; subject matter treated in burlesque, drawn from myth or the epic cycles
  3. c an international literary movement that originated with nineteenth century French poets to make literatur resemble music; avoided direct statements and exposition for powerful evocation and suggestion to capture visions of higher reality.
  4. d the song for the entrance of the chorus
  5. e the primary unresolved issue in a drama as it unfolds; result of artful plotting, raising suspense and expecation in a play's action as it moves toward its outcome.

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. A form of comic drama developed by guilds of professional Italian actors in the mid-16th century. Playing stock characters, masked players improvised diaologue around a given scenarios (with a brief outlinejmakring entrances and main course of action). In a typical play a pair of young lovers (played without masks), aided by a clever servant (Harlequin), outwit older masked characters.
  2. exposition, foreshadowing, theme, symbolism, suspense, rising action, climax, denouement, falling action
  3. In classical Greek theater architecture, "the place for dancing", a circular, level performance space at the base of a horseshoe-shaped ampitheater, where twelve, then later fifteen, young, masked, male chorus members sang and danced the odes interspersed between dramatic episodes in a play. Today, it is the ground floor seats in a theater or concert hall.
  4. arena theater with rising tiers around a central open space
  5. A comic style arousing laughter through jokes, slapstick humor, sight gags, and boisterous clowning. Little intellectual appeal.

5 True/False Questions

  1. Restoration periodAfter 1660 when Charles II was restored to the English throne and reopeed the London playhouses which had been closed by the Puritans, who considered theater immoral.

          

  2. prologueThe representation of serious and important actions that lead to a disastrous end for the protagonist.

          

  3. Romantic ComedyA form of comic drama in which the plot focuses on one or more pairs of young lovers who overcome difficulties to achieve a happy ending (usually marraige).

          

  4. FarceA type of comedy featuring exaggerated character types in ludricrous and improbable situations, provoking belly laughs with sexual mix-ups, crude verbal jokes, pratfalls, and knockabout horseplay.

          

  5. closet dramaOriginally, any drama accompanied by music used to enhance mood or emotion. By the nineteenth century, it became highly stereotypical and favored sensational plots over realistic characters. Characters are stock characters, usually either highly virtuous or villainous, and plots are generally sensational and improbable. Virtue inevitably triumphs over villainy. The term is used today almost exclusively as a pejorative.

          

Create Set