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A work of prose fiction of between 17,000 and 40,000 words; it is usually more tightly controlled and concentrated than a novel, and longer and more complex than a short story.

A) Novel
B) Novella
C) Short story
D) Oral tale

B) Novella

The person who recounts a narrative or tells a story to an audience.

A) Genre
B) Oral tale
C) Narrative
D) Narrator

D) Narrator

Prose narrative about imaginary people and events.

A) Fiction
B) Nonfiction
C) Genre
D) Oral tale

A) Fiction

A relatively short work of prose fiction between 1,000 and 20,000 words, which is intended to be read in a single sitting.

A) Short story
B) Oral tale
C) Novel
D) Novella

A) Short story

A long work of prose fiction of about 40,000 words or more, and typically published as a stand-alone book.

A) Novel
B) Oral tale
C) Novella
D) Short story

A) Novel

A short account of an incident or series of incidents, whether actual or invented.

A) Fiction
B) Narrative
C) Narrator
D) Nonfiction

B) Narrative

Prose narratives that present historical facts and the lives of historical figures in imaginative ways; a fictional re-imagining of actual history.

A) Nonfiction
B) Historical fiction
C) Short story
D) Genre

B) Historical fiction

A term for different kinds of literature, such as fiction, poetry, drama, etc.

A) Narrator
B) Narrative
C) Genre
D) Novella

C) Genre

A story that is intended to be passed down from generation to generation by being read aloud.

A) Oral tale
B) Novel
C) Historical Fiction
D) Fiction

A) Oral tale

Factual prose narrative (including genres like history, biography, and autobiography), which focuses on real rather than imagined characters and events.

A) Fiction
B) Short sotry
C) Narrator
D) Nonfiction

D) Nonfiction

Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" is an example of which of the following genres of fiction?

A) Short story
B) Novella
C) Novel
D) Short short story

A) Short story - "Cathedral" is not short enough to be a short short story, nor is it long enough to be a novel or novella. It is a short story intended to be read in a single sitting.

Each of the books in the Twilight and Harry Potter series is an example of which of the following genres of fiction?

A) Novella

B) Short short story

C) Short story

D) Novel

D) el - Each of these books—Twilight, New Moon, The Sorcerer's Stone, The Order of the Phoenix, etc.—is a long work of fiction published as a stand-alone book. Each one is too long to be considered a novella, short story, or short short story.

Linda Brewer's "20/20" is an example of which of the following genres of fiction?

A) Novel

B) Short short story

C) Short sotry

D) Novella

B) Short short story - The tale is incredibly short, not nearly long enough to be a novel, novella, or short story. If a regular short story is like an email, then a short short story is like a text message or a Twitter post.

"The Itsy Bitsy Spider," "The Three Little Pigs," and "Jack and the Beanstalk" all may best be described as belonging to which of the following genres of fiction?

A) Oral tale

B) Historical Fiction

C) Novel

D) Novella

A) Oral tale - These are stories that are meant to be read aloud, and that most of us probably know by heart without having to consult a book. They are not based on historical figures—which rules out historical fiction—and they are not long enough to be novels or novellas.

Which of the following films is NOT an example of historical fiction?

A) The Other Boleyn Girl

B) The Girl with the Pearl Earring

C) Shakespeare in Love

D) Star Wars

D) Star Wars - This is the only answer choice that is not based on real, historical figures. Even if you've never heard of or seen the other three movies, you should be aware that Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader are fictional, rather than historical, characters.

Which of the following does NOT describe Robert's role in the narrator's experience of drawing a cathedral?

A) Robert is not present when the narrator draws the cathedral.

B) Robert asks the narrator to get a pen and paper to draw a cathedral.

C) Robert assures the narrator that he is producing a fine drawing.

D) Robert places his hand on top of the narrator's hand while he is drawing.

A) Robert is not present when the narrator draws the cathedral. - Robert does B, C, and D while the narrator draws the cathedral.

The narrator's wife met Robert when she

A) sat next to him on an airplane.
B) answered a "Help Wanted" ad.
C) joined Alcoholics Anonymous at the same time that he did.
D) helped him cross the road.

B) answered a "Help Wanted" ad. - The narrator's wife worked for a time reading to Robert.

Robert's personality is defined by his

A) interest in and openness to the world around him.
B) bitterness about his blindness.
C) nervousness and anxiety
D) tendency to pre-judge people and situations.

A) interest in and openness to the world around him. - Robert is a very open, easygoing, relaxed individual.

Which of the following is true of the narrator's wife's history?

A) Which of the following is true of the narrator's wife's history?
B) She wrote short stories.
C) She had divorced two men before she married the narrator.
D) She once tried to commit suicide.

D) She once tried to commit suicide. - The narrator tells us this early on in the story. She does write, but it is poetry, not short stories.

All of the following are true of the narrator except

A) he has few friends.
B) he worries constantly about money.
C) he has nightmares.
D) he is dissatisfied with his job.

B) he worries constantly about money.

A final section of a story, which ties up loose ends left dangling in the conclusion proper, updates us on what has happened to the characters since their conflicts were resolved, and/or provides some sort of commentary on the story's larger significance.

A) Epilogue
B) Climax
C) Foreshadowing
D) Exposition

A) Epilogue

The way in which the author sequences and paces the action in order to shape our response and interpretation; how a particular story presents what "happens" to an audience.

A) Pacing
B) Plot
C) Theme
D) Action

B) Plot

The events recounted in a fictional work; what "happens" over the course of a story.

A) Action
B) Plot
C) Pacing
D) Theme

A) Action

The central message of a fictional work.

A) Theme
B) Subplot
C) Plot
D) Action

A) Theme

A story that ends happily, often with marriage or some other acts of social integration and celebration.

A) Tragedy
B) Epilogue
C) Comedy
D) Metafiction

C) Comedy

When a character struggles to reconcile two competing desires, needs, or duties, or two parts or aspects of himself.

A) Pacing
B) Exposition
C) Internal Conflict
D) External Conflict

C) Internal Conflict

A Latin phrase that means "in the midst of things"; it is used to describe when a story begins somewhere in the middle of the action rather than at the very beginning.

A) Plot summary
B) In medias res
C) Epilogue
D) Exposition

B) In medias res

The first part of the plot, which introduces the characters, their situations, and the setting, giving us all the basic information that we need in order to understand what is to come.

A) Foreshadowing
B) Climax
C) Exposition
D) Epilogue

C) Exposition

A story that traces a downward movement centering on a character's fall from fortune into misfortune and isolation; it ends unhappily, often with death.

A) Metafiction
B) Epilogue
C) Comedy
D) Tragedy

D) Tragedy

The moment of greatest emotional intensity in a story; the moment when the outcome of the plot and the fate of the characters are decided.

A) Conflict
B) Action
C) Climax
D) Epilogue

C) Climax

Sonny's battle with heroin addiction in "Sonny's Blues" is an example of which of the following?

A) Conflict
B) Climax
C) Theme

A) Conflict - The word "battle" in the question is a dead giveaway. Sonny, like any ex-addict, finds himself torn between wanting to do something yet knowing that that something is bad.

When the narrator's mother describes the death of the narrator's uncle in "Sonny's Blues," this is an example of which of the following?

A) Flashback
B) Flashforward
C) Epilogue
D) Foreshadowing

A) Flashback - The events described by the narrator's mother happened long before the beginning of the actual story.

M. Lantin is happily married to a wife who has a fondness for the theater and fake jewelry. She keeps their home running very smoothly, and they seem to live a life of luxury. One night, she takes a chill when returning home from the opera, contracts pneumonia, and dies. M. Lantin is incredibly distraught at her passing, and soon finds it impossible to maintain their previous standard of living, despite his income and expenses remaining steady. Soon, he resorts to attempting to sell a piece of her fake jewelry. He is astounded when he discovers that the jewelry is real, not fake. M. Lantin passes out in the street when he realizes that the jewelry must have been gifts lavished on his wife by other men. When he comes to, he sells her entire jewelry collection for a small fortune and then quits his job. Six months later, he gets married to a second wife, who made his life miserable

The paragraph above is an example of which of the following?
A) Metafiction
B) Exposition
C) Plot summary
D) Epilogue

C) Plot summary - The paragraph quickly summarizes the general plot and action of the story.

The fact that M. Lantin's wife dies is an example of which of the following elements of "The Jewelry"?

A) Flashback
B) Action
C) Flashforward
D) Foreshadowing

B) Action - This is an event that occurs in the story.

At the end of "Sonny's Blues," the narrator watches Sonny up on stage, playing the piano for the first time in a year with wild abandon. This part of this story is which of the following?

A) Flashback
B) Pacing
C) Exposition
D) Climax

D) Climax - This is the moment of "greatest emotional intensity," when Sonny plays in front of a crowd after having gotten out of jail.

The narrator's relationship to Sonny could best be described as

A) Parental
B) Marked by jealousy and rivalry
C) Casual
D) uncaring

A) parental. - The narrator loves his brother, but he is also a sort of authority figure for him.

What event incites the narrator to reconnect with Sonny after a period of estrangement?

A) The narrator's wife leaves him.
B) The narrator's son is born.
C) The narrator converts to Christianity.
D) The narrator's daughter dies.

D) The narrator's daughter dies.

When the narrator's mother tries to convince him to promise to look after Sonny when she is gone, she tells him a story about how

A) his father saw his uncle killed
B) his sister died of polio
C) his grandfather became a jazz singer
D) his father gambled away the family's money.

A) his father saw his uncle killed

Which of the following describes the way M. Lantin lives while his first wife is alive?

A) they have modest means and therefore live frugally
B) they are poor but blissfully happy
C) they live lavishly but unhappy
D) they have modest means but seem to live lavishly

D) they have modest means but seem to live lavishly

Why does M. Lantin decide to sell his wife's fake jewelry?

A) He runs up some small debts and thinks the jewelry might be worth some pocket change.
B)
Every time he looks at the jewelry he is saddened over his wife's death.
C) He has wished for a long time to get rid of these reminders of his wife's bizarre habit of collecting worthless baubles.
D) After quitting his job, he has no other income.

A) He runs up some small debts and thinks the jewelry might be worth some pocket change.

The narrator uses the pronoun "I" and is a character in the story himself.

A) Third-person omniscient point of view
B) Second-person point of view
C) Third-person limited point of view
D) First-person point of view

D) First-person point of view

A narrator whom we do not fully trust because of obvious flaws or misperceptions.

A) Implied author
B) Central consciousness
C) Audience
D) Unreliable narrator

D) Unreliable narrator

The narrator uses the pronoun "you" to turn the reader into a character in the story.

A) Third-person limited point of view
B) Second-person point of view
C) Third-person omniscient point of view
D) First-person point of view

B) Second-person point of view

The narrator has access to the thoughts, perceptions, or experiences of just a single character in the story, and relates the action from his or her perspective. We as an audience are able to get "inside" the head of just one character.

A) Second-person point of view
B) First-person point of view
C) Third-person limited point of view
D) Third-person omniscient point of view

C) Third-person limited point of view

The person who recounts a narrative or tells a story to an audience; this person may or may not be an actual character in the story.

A) Narrator
B) Central consciousness
C) Reader
D) Implied author

A) Narrator

The distinct angle of vision or perspective from which the characters, events, and other aspects of a story are viewed.

A) Point of view
B) Central consciousness
C) Unreliable narrator
D) Implied author

A) Point of view

The narrator has access to the thoughts, perceptions, or experiences of more than one character in the story. Because of this, we as an audience are able to get "inside" the heads of multiple characters.

A) Third-person omniscient point of view
B) Third-person objective point of view
C) Second-person point of view
D) First-person point of view

A) Third-person omniscient point of view

The narrator does not explicitly report the characters' thoughts and feelings, but instead lets their words and actions speak for themselves. The narrator simply shows us what the characters are saying and doing, rather than telling us what they are thinking and feeling.

A) First-person point of view
B) Third-person objective point of view
C) Third-person omniscient point of view
D) Second-person point of view

B) Third-person objective point of view

Not to be confused with the flesh-and-blood human being who actually wrote the story, this term instead refers to the author that we imagine in our heads whenever we read a particular story, whose perspective and intended values govern the whole work, including the narrator.

A) Reader
B) Narrator
C) Implied author
D) Central consciousness

C) Implied author

The character upon whom a third-person limited narrator focuses

A) Narrator
B) Reader
C) Implied author
D) Central consciousness

D) Central consciousness

In Edgar Allen Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado," the character of Montresor also fulfills which of the following functions?

A) Implied author
B) Central consciousness
C) Audience
D) Narrator

D) Narrator - Montresor is both protagonist (the central character in the work) and narrator (the one telling the story).

Edgar Allen Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" uses which of the following points of view?

A) Third-person limited point of view
B) First-person point of view
C) Second-person point of view
D) Third-person objective point of view

B) First-person point of view - The story is told from the point of view of Montresor, who is himself a character in the story. The constant use of "I" is a dead giveaway.

Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" uses which of the following points of view?

A) Third-person limited point of view
B) Second-person point of view
C) First-person point of view
D) Third-person objective point of view

D) Third-person objective point of view - This story is told from the perspective of a complete outsider, someone who is just recording the couple's words and actions without having access to their inner thoughts and feelings.

Jamaica Kincaid's "Girl" uses which of the following points of view?

A) Third-person limited point of view
B) First-person point of view
C) Third-person objective point of view
D) Second-person point of view

D) Second-person point of view - The point of view of the story is such that the narrator is speaking directly to the reader. The constant use of "you" is a dead giveaway.

James Baldwin's "Sonny's Blues" uses which of the following points of view?
A) Third-person limited point of view
B) First-person point of view C) Second-person point of view
D) Third-person objective point of view

B) First-person point of view - The story is told from the point of view of Sonny's brother, who is himself a character in the story. The constant use of "I" is a dead giveaway.

What kind of operation is the American (the central male character) describing in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants"?

A) An amputation
B) An abortion
C) Euthanasia
D) An appendectomy

B) An abortion

In what country is Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" set?

A) Spain
B) Italy
C) England
D) France

A) Spain

Which of the following best seems to describe the relationship between the narrator and the audience in Kincaid's "Girl."

A) A mother lecturing her son
B) A mother lecturing her daughter
C) A son lecturing his mother
D) A father lecturing his son

B) A mother lecturing her daughter

What technique does Montresor use to get Fortunato to proceed deeper and deeper into the underground vaults in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"?

A) He urges him to turn back
B) He pretends that they are lost
C) He begs and pleads with him to continue
D) He threatens him with a sword

A) He urges him to turn back

What is the nature of the "thousand injuries" and the "insult" that lead Montresor to avenge himself on Fortunato in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"?

A) Fortunato stole land from Montresor's estate
B) The story never clearly explains the nature of the injuries or the insult
C) Fortunato had an affair with Montresor's wife
D) Fortunato prevented Montresor from joining a powerful secret society

B) The story never clearly explains the nature of the injuries or the insult

Characters that change as a result of events that occur in the story.

A) Dynamic characters
B) Stock characters
C) Flat characters
D) Static characters

A) Dynamic characters

Simple, one-dimensional characters that behave and speak in predictable or repetitive ways.

A) Dynamic characters
B) Flat characters
C) Foils
D) Round characters

B) Flat characters

The leading character in any given story, upon whom the narrative focuses; he/she may be likeable or unlikable.

A) Protagonist
B) Archetype
C) Foil
D) Antagonist

A) Protagonist

The main character, force, or object that opposes the protagonist.

A) Antagonist
B) Foil
C) Archetype
D) Protagonist

A) Antagonist

Characters that act from varied, often conflicting motives, impulses, and desires, and who seem to have psychological complexity.

A) Stock characters
B) Flat characters
C) Square characters
D) Round characters

D) Round characters

Characters that do not change as a result of events that occur in the story.

A) Static characters
B) Protagonists
C) Round characters
D) Dynamic characters

A) Static characters

A setting that is very vague and general, yet is also instantly recognizable

A) Geographical setting
B) Place setting
C) Temporal setting
D) Archetypal setting

D) Archetypal setting

Flat characters who represent a familiar, frequently occurring type of person or stereotype.

A) Round characters
B) Foils
C) Dynamic characters
D) Stock characters

D) Stock characters

Characters that recur in the myths and literature of many different ages and cultures.

A) Round characters
B) Flat characters
C) Archetypes
D) Static characters

C) Archetypes

A character that helps by way of contrast to reveal the unique qualities of another (especially main) character.

A) Foil
B) Archetype
C) Protagonist
D) Antagonist

A) Foil

When is the temporal setting of Toni Morrison's "Recitatif"?

A) 18th century
B) 19th century
C) 17th century
D) 20th century

D) 20th century - The Civil Rights Movement (1960s) serves as a clear backdrop for a good portion of the story.

What country serves as the geographical setting for Katherine Anne Porter's "Flowering Judas"?

A) Germany
B) The United States
C) Mexico
D) Israel

C) Mexico

What kind of characterization does Ha Jin use to describe Yu Ming (the Old Whore) in "In Broad Daylight"?

A) Dynamic characterization
B) Neutristic characterization
C) Direct characterization
D) Indirect characterization

D) Indirect characterization - Jin never really delves into what characters are thinking or feeling. He lets their words and actions speak for themselves.

Roberta from Toni Morrison's "Recitatif" may best be described as which of the following kind of character?

A) Archetype
B) Stock character
C) Foil
D) Protagonist

C) Foil - The way in which Roberta's character speaks, acts, and is described serves as a contrast throughout the story for the how Twyla speaks, acts, and is described.

Twyla from Toni Morrison's "Recitatif" may best be described as which of the following kind of character?

A) Round character
B) Antagonist
C) Flat character
D) Stock character

A) Round character - Twyla is emotionally and psychologically complex; she is a very "real" character.

In Toni Morrison's "Recitatif," Twyla and Roberta find themselves on opposite sides of a picket line. What is the cause that they are protesting for and against?

A) Abortion.
B) Women's right to vote.
C) Tax increases.
D) The desegregation of public schools by busing students.

D) The desegregation of public schools by busing students.

In Katherine Anne Porter's "Flowering Judas," Braggioni is always playing which of the following musical instruments while at Laura's house?

A) Trumpet
B) Guitar
C) Piano
D) Violin

B) Guitar

How does the husband of Yu Ming (the Old Whore) die at the end of Ha Jin's "In Broad Daylight"?

A) He is hit by a train.
B) He is shot.
C) He hangs himself.
D) He is stoned to death by the crowd.

A) He is hit by a train.

What is the name of the narrator in Ha Jin's "In Broad Daylight"?

A) Heaven Lamp
B) Bare Hips
C) Eternal Way
D) White Cat

D) White Cat

After they leave the orphanage, where is the next place that Twyla and Roberta meet in Toni Morrison's "Recitatif"?

A) A picket line.
B) The Howard Johnson's where Twyla works.
C) A class reunion.
D) An airport.

B) The Howard Johnson's where Twyla works.

A direct comparison of two unlike things using the words "like" or "as."

A) Irony
B) Metaphor
C) Simile
D) Oxymoron

C) Simile

Attributing human qualities to objects or animals.

A) Simile
B) Oxymoron
C) Personification
D) Irony

C) Personification

An extended association, often sustained in every element (character, plot, setting, etc.) and throughout an entire work, between two levels of meaning, usually literal and abstract.

A) Allegory
B) Symbol
C) Myth
D) Irony

A) Allegory

A direct comparison of two unlike things without using the words "like" or "as."

A) Irony
B) Metaphor
C) Simile
D) Oxymoron

B) Metaphor

A combination of contradictory or opposite ideas, qualities, or entities.

A) Metaphor
B) Oxymoron
C) Allusion
D) Simile

B) Oxymoron

A meaning or outcome contrary to what is expected.

A) Oxymoron
B) Irony
C) Allegory
D) Allusion

B) Irony

A person, place, object, or image that represents more than its literal meaning.

A) Irony
B) Theme
C) Symbol
D) Moral

C) Symbol

A rule of conduct or maxim for living that some stories attempt to teach to their audiences.

A) Symbol
B) Irony
C) Theme
D) Moral

D) Moral

A general idea or insight conveyed by a literary work in its entirety.

A) Theme
B) Moral
C) Irony
D) Symbol

A) Theme

A reference, usually brief, to another text or some person or entity external to the work.

A) Simile
B) Allusion
C) Oxymoron
D) Irony

B) Allusion

Georgiana's hand-shaped birth-mark is a symbol of which of the following?

A) Innocence
B) Holiness
C) Sin
D) Human imperfection

D) Human imperfection - Humans are defined as being imperfect in some way, to some degree. Georgiana dies once the birthmark is removed because she is no longer imperfect, and thus no longer part of the human realm.

Consider the following passage: "The mind is in a sad state when Sleep, the all-involving, cannot confine her specters within the dim region of her sway, but suffers them to break forth, affrighting this actual life with secrets that perchance belong to a deeper one" (221).

The description given here of Sleep as a woman is an example of which of the following figures of speech?

A) Metaphor
B) Simile
C) Personification
D) Oxymoron

C) Personification - Sleep is described here as a woman.

Consider the following passage: "Even Pygmalion, when his sculptured woman assumed life, felt not greater ecstasy than mine will be" (222).

The reference made here to Pygmalion and his story is an example of which of the following figures of speech?

A) Oxymoron
B) Allusion
C) Metaphor
D) Simile

B) Allusion - This is a clear reference to a character and a story external to the text.

Consider the following passage: "At the mention of the birth-mark, Georgiana, as usual, shrank as if a red-hot iron had touched her cheek" (225).

The comparison made here between Georgian's reaction and being touched by a hot iron is an example of which of the following figures of speech?

A) Metaphor
B) Allusion
C) Oxymoron
D) Simile

D) Simile - The word "as" is used to link the two things together.

Consider the following passage: "It needed but a glance with the peculiar expression that his face often wore to change the roses of her cheek into a death-like paleness, amid which the crimson hand was brought strongly out, like a bas relief of ruby on the whitest marble" (220).

The comparison made here between Georgiana's cheeks and roses is an example of which of the following figures of speech?

A) Metaphor
B) Simile
C) Allusion
D) Personification

A) Metaphor - The two are compared directly without using "like" or "as." Her cheeks are not like roses, they are roses.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Birth-Mark," what effect does Aylmer's treatment have on Georgiana?

A) The birthmark disappears, and she dies.
B) The birthmark disappears, but she leaves him afterward.
C) The birthmark grows darker, and she dies.
D) She refuses to accept his treatment.

A) The birthmark disappears, and she dies.

While he rows during the night, the correspondent in Stephen's Crane's "The Open Boat" is made uneasy by the presence of which of the following?

A) A screeching albatross
B) An eerie cloud in the night sky
C) A shark
D) A giant tanker in the distance

C) A shark

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Birth-Mark," which of the books in Aylmer's library intrigues Georgiana the most?

A) Those that deal with romantic intrigues
B) Those that advise against chemical remedies for birthmarks
C) The one written by Aylmer
D) Those that describe alchemical discoveries

C) The one written by Aylmer

Which of the following is the most often-repeated visual image in Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat"?

A) Waves
B) Sharks
C) Sails
D) Trees

A) Waves

In Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat," which of the following best describes the relationship between the men in the dinghy?

A) They blame one another for their predicament.
B) They are united by an unspoken sense of brotherhood.
C) They are naively optimistic.
D) They are depressed, hopeless, and lethargic.

B) They are united by an unspoken sense of brotherhood.

Who is the main character in Raymond Carver's "Cathedral."

Robert

Who is the main character in " The Jewelry"?

M. Lantin

Who is the main character in "Sonny's Blues"?

Sonny

Who is the main character in Edgar ALlen Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Montresor

Who is the main character in Toni Morrison's "Recitatif"?

Twyla

Who is the main character in Katherine Anne Porter's "Flowering Judas"?

Laura

Who is the main character in Ha Jin's "In Broad Daylight"?

White Cat

Who is the main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Birth-Mark"?

Aylmer

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