UnitNine9.-ROMANTIC AND VICTORIAN POETRY

68 terms by Barkleyra210 

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aridity

excessively dry; lacking in interest

essence

that which makes something what it is; the essential element or feature

franchise

the right to vote

impetus

the driving force behind a cause or movement

intuition

the spontaneous understanding of something without using the reasoning process

meager

extremely small or scanty

myriad

having innumerable aspects

perceptive

insightful; having the ability to understand things not obviously understandable

phenomenon

a significant event

philosophy

the general beliefs, attitudes, and ideas of an individual, group, or movement

populace

the common people

radical

a person who advocates extreme changes

symmetrical

balanced; well proportioned

synthetic

putting parts together to make a whole

urbane

very polite and elegant

wane

to decrease or dwindle

Romanticism

refers to a comprehensive movement, or trend, in European thought and arts that began at the end of the eighteenth century.

The Victorian Age of England—named after

the queen who ruled from 1837 to 1901

specific characteristics

material progress; commercial prosperity; political, religious, and social reforms; scientific and mechanical developments; and conflicting views concerning scientific progress.

The major causes of the Romantic revolution are best realized by examining

the political, social, and economical revolutions that either preceded or coincided with it

simply defined as a reaction against neoclassical emphasis on reason, rules, and restraint—was more a state of mind than a literary movement.

Romanticism

The themes and ideas of the times caused

poetry to take certain forms

Individualism

American, French, and Industrial revolutions generated a genuine concern for the rights and dignity of the individual that became characteristic of the Romantic Movement in England

French Revolution

began in 1789 with the storming of the Bastille prison by mobs of French people—common people and peasants—who would no longer endure the economic and social hardships imposed on them by an aristocratic society.

deprivation

the condition of lacking or losing something that is needed or desired

didactic

intended to teach or instruct

imbue

to fill (the mind); to inspire

industrious

working conscientiously and consistently

luxuriate

to enjoy or indulge oneself

propriety

socially correct behavior

conventional

conforming to accepted ways of behavior; traditional

picturesque

enchanting; quaint

poet laureate

a British poet who is honored as the national poet

sensory

having to do with the five physical senses

sensuous

relating to or having an effect on the senses

Which of the following is the first generation of Romantic poets?

Wordsworth and Coleridge

Wordsworth's early poems do not yet reflect which of his qualities?

his disillusionment with the outcome of the French Revolution

Tintern Abbey

Wordsworth's best-known work.
-located in a valley at the edge of the Wye River near Southeastern Wales
- 1798 in Lyrical Ballads

composite

composed of various elements or parts

elusive

difficult to grasp, define, or understand.

omen

a sign or symbol for something.

Coleridge

-born in 1772,
-son of a clergyman
-preferred solitude and spent most of his time reading.
- met William Wordsworth in 1795.
-own poetry is varied
-best-known works are those of mystery and magic
-also wrote many blank verse poems and more traditional odes.
-Coleridge graduated from college in 1794

Wordsworth and Coleridge

both romantic poets and shared many beliefs and ideas, their poetry is significantly different

Wordsworth

- was a more disciplined man who generally followed his own prescription for writing poetry.

atypical

not normal; irregular.

defiant

boldly resisting; refusing to obey or conform

flamboyant

showy; attracting attention.

immune

protected; unable to be affected by.

inauspicious

without signs or promise of success or fortune.

masochistic

enjoying one's own suffering.

masochistic

enjoying one's own suffering.

panoramic

a broad view of changing scenes.

travelogue

a narrative about travel.

Byron

- born in 1788
-life began inauspiciously
- born with a deformed leg
- attended Trinity College where he began to write poetry for publication.
-From 1809 to 1811, Byron went on the tour of Europe and Asia that he wrote about in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
-was an atypical Romantic
- Canto III was published in 1816.

The archetype of the Byronic hero was different because

the Byronic hero did not always consider himself innocent

staccato

abrupt; disconnected

tempestuous

violent; turbulent

Shelley

-born on August 4, 1792
-death in 1822. Shelley and a friend died when their boat sank.
-wrote his best poetry during his four years in Italy
-themes of his poetry mirror the themes of his life: love of freedom, idealism, spirit of protest, and love of beauty and goodness
-the idealist
-His greatest work, Prometheus Unbound

dogmatic

speaking or acting with real or assumed certainty and authority

empathy

the ability to feel with or experience another person's feelings

innate

inborn; inherent

Keats

-born on October 31, 1795, in London.
-8eight years old, his father died in a riding accident.
-14fourteen, his mother died of tuberculosis
-published his first volume at the age of twenty-two
-he gave up medicine for a career in literature
-Keats died in Rome.
-

ambivalence

condition of having conflicting feelings or attitudes about a person, thing, or situation

resplendent

shining brightly; splendid

Tennyson

-born in 1809 in northern England
-His father was a rector who was subject to fits of depression and violence.
-

innovate

To introduce new ideas or methods.

obscure

Difficult to understand.

Browning

-was born in 1812 of well-to-do parents
-married Elizabeth Barrett,
-started to write poetry when he was quite young
-His poetic ability developed slowly; consequently, it was not until 1842, when he was thirty, that Browning discovered a type of poetry that suited him
-continued to write until his death in 1889.
-Early in his poetic career, Browning was an admirer of Shelley
-first work, Pauline, was consciously modeled after Shelley.
-John Stuart Mill, one of the foremost critics and essayists in all of English literature, accused Browning of self-worship in the poem

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