ECSL HIstory #6

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Royeen (2003)

We must honor our past and appreciate our "herstory."

Royeen (2003)

We can use chaos theory to integrate our science with our practice.

Royeen (2003)

The tetralogy of occupation consists of 4 simple steps: 1) Purposeful activity; 2) Activity plus meaning, 3) Doing with meaning, and 4) Participation in context.

Royeen (2003)

Occupational Therapy is a process not a product.

Royeen (2003)

We must pay our "professional tax" by contributing to the profession of OT.

Royeen (2003)

Suggested that entry-level clinical doctorate should be the norm for OT.

Royeen (2003)

The "web of occupation" includes different aspects of occupation that are interdependent and constantly co-affecting each other.

Royeen (2003)

Chaos theory says that within a system that seems to be in disorder (or chaos), there is an underlying order (meaning).

Royeen (2003)

We must honor our past, specifically the contributions of our foremothers to solidify OT and pave the path of the future.

Royeen (2003)

Discusses occupational patterns and meta-patterns (The characteristic arrangement of occupation which shapes and forms our lives).

Schwartz (2009)

Both visions are concerned with occupation and science.

Schwartz (2009)

Centennial Vision does not represent a new set of values, but rather builds on the values of the Founding Vision.

Schwartz (2009)

Describes the contributions of three founders of occupational therapy: Slagle, Barton, Dunton.

Schwartz (2009)

Calls for action to lead occupational therapy in implementing the Centennial Vision.

Schwartz (2009)

More occupational therapist are earning PhDs and conducting scientific research.

Schwartz (2009)

The Centennial Vision reflects the movement within society from a medical illness model to a prevention wellness model

Schwartz (2009)

Pivotal point in our profession.

Schwartz (2009)

We all have the potential to be risk takers and confident leaders.

Schwartz (2009)

The founders' vision of occupational therapy was humanistic, holistic, and scientific.

Schwartz (2009)

Dunton is considered the "father of occupational therapy".

Peloquin (2005)

Celebrated 50th anniversary of ECSL

Peloquin (2005)

Paid tribute to previous ECS lecturers and founders of OT by quoting them throughout their lecture

Peloquin (2005)

Goal was to cast light on the ETHOS of occupational therapy

Peloquin (2005)

Aimed to gain a fresh perspective on current challenges

Peloquin (2005)

Stressed the need to 'reclaim the profession's heart'

Peloquin (2005)

Outlined 5 Guiding Beliefs

Peloquin (2005)

Guiding belief #5: Effective practice is artistry and science

Peloquin (2005)

Mentions 'depersonalization' as a current challenge to our profession

Peloquin (2005)

Guiding belief #1: Time, place and circumstance open paths to occupation (We are pathfinders)

Peloquin (2005)

"We engage- we involve and occupy ourselves and commit to mutual promise- so that others may also engage. This is our character; this is our genius; this is our spirit."

Hasselkus (2006)

"Everyday occupations is what we all engage in everyday, but not necessarily daily."

Hasselkus (2006)

The client knows their world as they experiece it, not by our experience.

Hasselkus (2006)

Small experiences are much seen but seldom noticed.

Hasselkus (2006)

Everyday occupations are what give life rythm and shape our worlds.

Hasselkus (2006)

OT's provide therapy that is seen as common, yet everone does things different and for different purposes with different meanings.

Hasselkus (2006)

Food plays a central role every day in our lives.

Hasselkus (2006)

Food presentation is taken for granted yet is an example of occupational form.

Coster (2008)

We must change our standard views of measurement in order to treat each individual that needs our service

Coster (2008)

One of OT's major concerns is looking at the client as a "whole person," which brings on pressure and challenges in our practice/research.

Coster (2008)

All cultures have different terms when describing the levels of pain.

Coster (2008)

The word recovery can be taken out of context when using different selective measures to treat the client. Each client has a different means of recovery.

Coster (2008)

As therapists we need to find the right order response questions to ask the clients in order to reach the recovery level.

Coster (2008)

Asking questions on a number scales creates problems when asking how the client actually feels, or the level of pain the client is feeling.

Coster (2008)

Feels we should come up with new measures in order to treat all types of injury, illness, or disability

Coster (2008)

Continually testing, researching and enhancing tools will help better treat the client instead of automatically performing surgical procedures.

Coster (2008)

A good therapist must be willing to try different ways to capture the clients story.

Christiansen (1999)

The ability to express unique identity in a manner that gives meaning to life is one of the most compelling needs of every human being.

Christiansen (1999)

Reflexive Consciousness (the I and the Me)

Christiansen (1999)

Identity has no existence outside of interpersonal relationships

Christiansen (1999)

Language has an important role in creating understanding and meaning

Christiansen (1999)

Self-narrative or life story provides coherence and meaning for everyday events and life itself

Christiansen (1999)

Possible Selves, Imagined Selves - images of action, give personal meaning and structure to a person's thoughts

Christiansen (1999)

Social approval, Competent performance, Performance deficits, and Stigma all influence our interpretations of everyday life and our identities

Christiansen (1999)

Sense of coherence - includes a view of one's life as understandable, meaningful, manageable

Christiansen (1999)

Occupations hold a central place in creating life meaning and shaping and maintaining identity

Christiansen (1999)

Occupations constitute the mechanism that enables people to develop and express their identities

Christiansen (1999)

OT can provide opportunities for clients to establish, maintain or reclaim their identities, which is a key issue in health and well-being

Christiansen (1999)

Interpersonal Aspect of Selfhood (identities are shaped w/in a social setting)

Christiansen (1999)

Agential Aspect of Identity (Selfing, or shaping identity through experience)

Christiansen (1999)

OT should provide environments that help people achieve success in tasks instrumental to their identities and explore possible selves

Christiansen (1999)

Those with an acquired disability must reintegrate into social patterns promoting acceptance of self and a comfortable relationship with able-bodied persons, which leads to more positive acceptance by those peers.

Christiansen (1999)

Social constructionism - Distributed selves - The person is not easily separated from their social contexts

Christiansen (1999)

We understand our lives as evolving narratives that must have coherence and unity - McAdams says, "We create unity & purpose from life stories that make sense to ourselves and others"

Zemke (2004)

Edelman's theory- the brain adapts through a selection of process in which it chooses neurons to shape and strengthen. Neurons get linked together when people engage in occupations

Zemke (2004)

two aspects of human time and space: 1. external- geographic location 2. locational- where time and space is experienced

Zemke (2004)

"Focus in occupational therapy and occupational science should be on occupational temporality, the experience of time as shaped by engagement in occupations."

Zemke (2004)

3 temporalities of time: 1. time compression (less time is passing than indicated, "time flies") 2. temporal protraction (more time is passing than indicated, aka work) 3. synchronicity (perception of how much time is passing is what the clock indicates)

Zemke (2004)

placemaking: maintaining a place that has been created

Zemke (2004)

occupations can be inhibited or enabled by time and space.

Zemke (2004)

Occupational Horizons are continually developed: for example, an infant being taken care of by its mother is learning new horizons through feeding and play

Zemke (2004)

5 major actions needed to create a health society: public policy, supportive environment, community action, personal skills, health services

Zemke (2004)

Cosmic time and space (general theme): humans can trace their origins through time and space

Zemke (2004)

role as OTs: know that issues within society are in terms of occupation for people and clients

Dunn (2001)

Believed in interdisciplinary studies

Dunn (2001)

sensory processing is intertwined with other brain functions

Dunn (2001)

Wrote the model of sensory processing: Sensory seeking, low registration, sensory sensitivity, sensory avoiding

Dunn (2001)

Studied groups with different human conditions: i.e. schizophrenia, fatigue, brain disorders

Dunn (2001)

Sensory processing remains constant across the lifespan.

Dunn (2001)

We can use information about sensory processing and temperament to support success in daily life

Dunn (2001)

"Sensory processing patterns are reflections of who we are: These patterns are not a pathology that needs fixing"

Dunn (2001)

We must help our clients to construct environments and establish routines that support their daily life.

Dunn (2001)

No pattern of sensory processing is necessarily bad

Dunn (2001)

It may be possible to link personality, temperament, nervous system functions and sensory processing patterns

Holm (2000)

5 level hierarchy of Evidence or measuring stick: Level 1 is strongest evidence, level 5 is less convincing evidence.

Holm (2000)

Level 1 - multiple randomized controlled trials, 2 - one randomized controlled trial, 3 - trials without randomization, 4 - non-experimental (muliti-site descriptive) studies, 5 - qualitative descriptive studies

Holm (2000)

Answer yes to these 5 questions to move towards evidence based practice: Do I examine what I do by asking clinical questions?, Do I take time to track down the best evidence to guide what I do?, Do I appraise the evidence or take it at face value?, Do I use the evidence to do the "right things right?", Do I evaluate the impact of Evidence-Based practice?

Holm (2000)

Barriers to Evidence-Based Practice: lack of administrative support, lack of access to research evidence, lack of skill in finding the evidence, lack of skill in interpreting the evidence, and lack of time

Holm (2000)

Reframes Barriers into Motivators: Legislation, regulation, prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities, capitations for reimbursement system for rehab hospitals

Holm (2000)

2 Habits we need to develop: use evidence based practice now by searching for evidence, appraising its value, and presenting it to those we serve, and improve research competencies to advance the evidence base of occupational therapy in the new millennium

Holm (2000)

Provide us with incentive to describe, examine, and publish evidence

Holm (2000)

We need competence as professionals in searching, appraising, applying existing evidence

Holm (2000)

Performance = motivation x competence/ barriers

Holm (200)

Evidence based practice: integrating individual clinical expertise with the use of current best evidence. In the new millennium we need to justify what we do and how we do it.

Hinojosa (2007)

We live in a time of hyperchange. In order for us to survive, OTs must also become innovators of change in our profession.

Hinojosa (2007)

Tale of India of 3 Fish - teaches us that OT cannot "wait and see." We must plan ahead in order to survive as a profession.

Hinojosa (2007)

Questions the need for some of AOTA's commissions: Are they necessary?

Hinojosa (2007)

OT education also needs to change to remain relevant in this rapidly changing era. NYU has responded to this challenge.

Hinojosa (2007)

Reimbursers, payers and consumers expect more from OT in this era of hyperchange.

Hinojosa (2007)

We have an ethical duty to incorporate our scientific theory and frames of reference into our interventions. (Theory-based frames of reference must guide our interventions).

Hinojosa (2007)

Because of this era of rapid change, OT has been forced to focus on productivity and efficiency rather than effectiveness. Treatment has become more routine and less personal.

Hinojosa (2007)

The associations of a mature profession (for OT = AOTA) should focus on external issues affecting the profession, deal with rapid change and shifting priorities in the profession, restructure to be able to make quick decisions, etc....

Hinojosa (2007)

Personal and professional relationships are vital to our profession. We must be committed to building rapport and working effectively with others.

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