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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Action
  2. F-Stop
  3. Point and Shoot Camera
  4. Fox Talbot
  5. Framing
  1. a The number defining how large or small your aperture is set to. Smaller numbers (1, 1.4, 2, 2.8) equal a larger opening, whereas larger numbers (22, 32, 45, 64) equal a smaller opening.
  2. b You show this by either stopping or freezing it, or by using the panning technique. Stop action utilizes high shutter speeds, and should be believable. Panning will give a 'blurred' effect to the background and back half of your subject.
  3. c British inventor in the 1800's and photographer, who created the Calotype process, which is what modern photographic processes are derived.
  4. d The composition technique using objects in your photo to frame your subject, creating depth and interest.
  5. e An automatic, easy to use camera that determines your exposure and focus for you.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Used to crop into your photograph more, cutting out distracting objects or to move into your subject. Shortcut: c
  2. The photographic process in which glass plates were coated with egg white and silver nitrate solution to be used as negatives. This process was most used during the Civil War.
  3. The amount of light needed to make a photograph.
  4. The astronomer who discovered sodium thiosulfate can be used to 'fix' photographs and allow them to be taken into open light.
  5. The number of pixels per inch in your image. Often referred to in pixels per inch or ppi. A higher number will give you more detail and fineness in your image.

5 True/False questions

  1. PerspectiveThe opening in the lens that allows light to come through to expose your photo.

          

  2. RepetitionThe composition technique using repetition of objects, colors, textures, or lines to create interest and attention for your viewer. Breaking the repetition is also a way to draw interest for your viewer. Odd numbered groupings are best - 3 or 5.

          

  3. OverexposedAllowing too much light into your camera for your photograph. Your photo will be too light or white.

          

  4. UnderexposedAllowing too little light into your camera for your photograph. Your photo will be too dark or black.

          

  5. Single Lens Reflex CameraAn automatic, easy to use camera that determines your exposure and focus for you.

          

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