Julius Caesar: Famous Lines and Phrases

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From the key in the back of the book

Who said "Beware the ides of March"

Soothsayer

What do the lines "... he doth bestride the narrow world/ Like a Colossus, and we petty men/ Walk under his huge legs and peep about to find ourselves dishonorable graves" mean?

"While Caesar walks the Earth like a fierce giant, we (Romans) walk under him and look forward to dying as slaves to him"

Who said these lines and to whom did he say them: "... he doth bestride the narrow world/ Like a Colossus, and we petty men/ Walk under his huge legs and peep about to find ourselves dishonorable graves" ?

Cassius to Brutus

What do the lines "The fault dear Brutus, is not in our stars,/ But in ourselves..." mean?

"Our faults (Romans) are not in fate or the stars but in ourselves"

Who said: "The fault dear Brutus, is not in our stars,/ But in ourselves..." ?

Cassius

What do the lines "Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed/ That he is grown so great?" mean?

"What does Caesar eat that made him grow so great?"

Who said and to whom did he say it: "Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed/ That he is grown so great?" ?

Cassius to Brutus

These lines are part of a very famous speech. What is the gist of this speech? "Let me have men about me that are fat...". Who said these lines?

The fat men speech by Caesar. The speech has to do with thin men being deep thinkers and interpreters who are never at ease while someone is above them. Fat men however do not think for themselves and they do not care if there is an authority figure above them. Therefore, Caesar prefers if he has fat men around him as their company is better.

This line gets used in modern day language however it came from Julius Caesar. What do the lines mean, who said them, and who did he say them to?: "But for mine own part, it was Greek to me"

The lines were about Cicero speaking. He spoke in Greek. Casca, who was narrating this to Brutus and Cassius had heard the whole thing. When asked what Cicero said in Greek, Casca said it was Greek and because he does not speak Greek, he did not know what it meant. It was as good as being gibberish.

What do the lines "Cowards die many times before their deaths;/ The valiant never taste of death but once" mean?

Cowards die many psychological deaths before they truly die but the brave never die (psychologically) until they truly die.

Who said the lines: "Cowards die many times before their deaths;/ The valiant never taste of death but once" ?

Caesar

What do the lines "Danger knows full well/ That Caesar is more dangerous then he./ We are two lions littered in one day, And I the elder and more terrible" ?

Caesar talking about himself. He says that he is more dangerous and brave than danger itself. One day he battled it and he won

What do the lines: "Know Caesar doth not wrong, nor without cause/ Will he be satisfied." mean?

"Know that I am not unjust, and I will not grant him a pardon without reason"

What do the lines: "Et tu, Brute?---Then fall, Caesar" mean?

"You Brutus would turn against me too? Then I will die."

What does "O mighty Caesar, dost thou lie so low? Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils/ Shrunk to this little measure?" mean? Who said it?

"Caesar, is all your glory gone. Do you, who has done so many great and valiant things, lie so low? Is all you've done nothing? It was said by Antony.

What do the lines "Thou art the ruins of the noblest man/ That ever lived in the tide of times" mean? Who said them?

"You (the conspirators) are whats left of the most noble Roman of all time" This was said by Antony.

What do the lines "Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war..." mean? What was the gist of this speech. Who was it given by?

"War is imminent. There will soon be a civil war so bad that mothers will be happy to see their dead children cut into little pieces" This was said by Antony.

Whose speech is this from? What does it mean? How does this person end the speech? "Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my cause..."

It is the beggining of Brutus' eulogy. He is getting the attention of the Romans. Brutus ends the speech by taking out his dagger and claiming that he killed Caesar to help Rome. If his death would help Rome, he will kill himself with the same dagger.

Whose speech is this from? What does it mean? What sort of irony is in this speech and how is it shown? "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears./ I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him./ The evil that men do lives after them;/ The good is often interred in their bones"

It is from Antony's eulogy. He gets their attention and then he says that he does not want to praise Caesar. When people die, only their wrongdoings and evils are remembered. All their virtues and accomplishments seem to die with them. There is verbal irony (sarcasm) in the speech. When Antony says "Brutus is an honorable man" he means it sarcastically. It is clear that Brutus is not good from Antony's speech.

What does the line "Ambition should be made of sterner stuff" mean? Who said it?

It was said by Antony about Caesar when earlier in the speech, Antony said that he cried when his people cried. If he was ambitious would he care. Would he be soft enough to cry for the poor?

What does "O judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts/ And men have lost their reason" mean?

"Men have become brutish beasts and lost their ability and sense to reason"

What does the line "This was the most unkindest cut of all" mean. What was it about?

"This cut, made by Brutus was what really killed Caesar. When he saw his own best friend turn against him, he died."

What do the lines "There is a tide in the affairs of men/ Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune" mean?

"We have the opportunity! If we take it now, we will be triumphant! If not, we will never get it again!"

What do the lines "O Julius Caesar; thou art mighty yet;/ Thy spirit walks an turns our swords in our own proper entrails" mean? Who said this?

Brutus: "Julius Caesar, even when you're dead you're strong. Your spirit walks and turns our own swords against us"

What do the lines "This was the most noblest Roman of them all..../ His life was gentle and the elements/ So mixed in him that nature might stand up/ And say to the world 'This was a man.'" mean? Who said them about whom?

Antony about Brutus: "This was the only Roman who killed Caesar for selfless reasons. He was kind and did not kill Caesar for personal gain. He was a true Roman."

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