Combo of ALL (1 of 7) with Ch. 38- incident mgmt (AAOS) and 27 others

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Bills of Lading

The shipping papers used for transport of chemicals over roads and highways, also referred to as freight bills.

carboys

Glass, plastic, or steel containers ranging in volume 5-15 Gal

Casualty Collection Area

An area set up by physicians, nurses, and other hospital staff near a major disaster scene where patients can receive further triage and medical care.

Chemical Transportation Center (CHEMTREC)

An agency that assists emergency personnel in identifying and handling hazardous materials transport incidents.

Cold Zone

A safe area at a Hazmat incident for the agencies involved in the operations. Incident commander, command post, EMS providers, and other support functions necessary to control the incident should be located in cold zone. Also referred to as clean zone or support zone.

Command

In incident command the position that oversees the incident, establishes objectives, and priorities and from there develops a response plan.

Command Post

Designated field command center where incident commander and support personnel are located.

Container

Any vessel or receptacle that holds material including, storage vessels, pipelines, and packaging.

Control Zones

Areas at Hazmat material incident that are disignated as Hot, Warm, or Cold based on safety issues and degree of hazard found.

Cylinders

Portable compressed gas containers used to hold liquids and gases uninsulated, compressed gas cylinders are used to store substances such as nitrogen, argon, helium, and oxygen. Have range of sizes and internal pressures.

Danger Zone

An area where individuals can be exposed to toxic substances, lethal rays, or ignition, or explosion of Hazmat.

Decontamination

Process of removing or neutralizing and properly disposing of Hazmat from equipment, patients, and rescue personnel.

Decontamination Area

Designated area in a Hazmat incident where all patients and rescuers must be decontaminated before going to another area.

Demobilization

Process of directing responders to return to their facilities when work at a disaster or Mass Casualty Incident has finished, or at least for those responders.

Disaster

A widespread event that disrupts community resources and functions, in turn threatening public safety and property.

Drums

Barrel-like containers used to store a wide variety of substances including, food grade materials, corrosives, flamable liquids and grease. May be constructed of low carbon steel, polyethyline, cardboard, stainless steel, nickel, and other materials.

Emergency Response Guidebook

A preliminary action guide for first responders operating at a Hazmat incident in coordination with U.S. Dept. of Transportations Labels and Placards marking system. The ERG was jointly developed by DOT, the secretariate of communications and transportations of Mexico, and transport Canada.

Extrication Supervisor

In incident command the person appointed to determine the type of equipment and resources needed for a situation involving extrication, or special rescue also called the rescue officer.

Finance

In incident command, the position in an incident responsible for accounting of all expenditures.

Freelancing

When individual units or different organizations make independent and often inefficient decisions about next appropriate action.

Freight Bills

Similar to Bills of Lading, shipment papers used for transport of chemicals along roads and highways.

Hazardous Material

Any substance that is toxic, poisonous, radioactive, flammable, or explosive, and causes injury or death with exposure.

Hazardous Material Incident

An incident in which a hazardous material is no longer properly contained and isolated.

Hot Zone

The area immediately surrounding a hazardous materials spill/incident site that is directly dangerous to life and health. All personnel working in the hotzone must wear complete, appropriate clothing and equipment. Entry requires approval by the incident commander or other supervisor.

Incident Action Plan

An oral or written plan stating general objectives, reflecting the overall strategy for managing an incident.

Incident Commander (IC)

Overall leader of the incident command system (ICS) to whom commanders or leaders of incident command divisions report.

Incident Command System (ICS)

A system implemented to manage disasters and mass casualty incidents in which section chiefs including, finance, logistics, operations, and planning report to incident commander.

Intermodal Tanks

Shipping and storage vessels that can be either pressurized or nonpressurized.

Joint Information Center

An area designated by the IC or designee in which public information officers from multiple agencies agencies disseminate information about the incident.

jumpSTART Triage

Sorting system for pediatric patients younger than 8 years old or weighing less than 100 lbs. There is a minor adaptation for infants since they cannot ambulate on their own.

Liaisson Officer

In incident command, the person who relays information, concerns and requests among responding agencies.

Logistics

In incident command, the position that helps procure, stockpile equipment and supplies during an incident.

Mass-Casualty Incident (MCI)

An emergency situation involving three or more patients or can place greate demand on the equipment or personnel of the EMS system, or has the potential to produce multiple casualties.

Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)

A form provided by manufacturers and compounders (blenders) of chemicals containing information about chemical composition, physical and chemical properties, health and safety hazards, emergency response, and waste disposal of specific material.

Medical Incident Command

A branch of operations in a unified command system whose three designated sector positions are, triage, treatment, and transport.

Morgue Supervisor

In incident command person who works with area medical examiners, coroners, and law enforcement agencies to coordinate dispostion of dead victims.

Mutual Aid Response

An agreement between neightboring EMS systems to resond to mass-casualty incidents or disasters in each other's region when local resources are insufficient to handle the response.

National Incident Management System (NIMS)

Department of Homeland Security system designed to enable federal, state, and local governments and private sector and nongovernmental organizations to effectively and efficiently prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of size, cause, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism .

Non Bulk Storage Vessels

Any container other than bulk storage containers such as, drums, bags, compressed gas cylinders, and cryogenic containers. Non Bulk storage vessels store commonly used commercial and industrial chemicals such as solvents, industrial cleaners, and compounts.

Operations

In incident command the position that carries out the orders of the commander to help resolve the incident.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) levels

Measures of the amount and type of protective equipment that an individual needs to avoid injury during contact with a hazardous material.

Placards

Signage required to be placed on all four sides of highway transport vehicles, railroad tank cars, and other forms of hazardous material transportation. The sign identifies the hazardous contents of the vehicle using a standardization system with 10 3/4" diamond shaped indicators.

Planning

In incident command, the position that ultimately produces a plan to resolve any incident.

Primary Triage

A type of patient sorting used to rapidly categorize patients. The focus is on speed and locating all patients, and determining an initial priority as their conditions warrant.

Public Information Officer (PIO)

In incident command, the person who keeps the public informed, and relays information to the press.

Rehabilitation Area

The area that provides protection and treatment to firefighters and other personnel working at an emergency. Here, workers are medically monitored and receive any needed care as they enter and leave the scene.

Rehabilitation Supervisor

In incident command, the person who establishes an area that protects responders from the elements and the situation.

Rescue Supervisor

In incident command, the person appointed to determine the type of equipment and resources needed for a situation involving extrication, or special rescue. Also called extrication officer.

Safety Officer

In incident command, the person that gives the go ahead to a plan or who may stop an operation when rescuer safety is an issue.

Secondary Containment

An engineered method to control spilled or released product if the main containment vessel fails.

Secondary Triage

A type of patient sorting used in the treatment sector that involves re-triage of patients.

Single Command System

A command system in which one person is in charge, generally used with small incidents that involve only one responding agency or one jurisdiction.

Span of Control

In incident command, the subordinate positions under the commander's direction to which the work load is distributed; the supervisor/worker ratio.

Staging supervisor

In incident command, the person who locates an area to stage equipment and personnel and tracks unit arrival and deployment from the staging area.

START Triage

A patient sorting process that stands for Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment, and uses a limited assessment of the patient's ability to walk, respiratory status, hemodynamic status, and neurologic status.

Termination of Command

The end of the incident command structure when an incident draws to a close.

Toxicity Levels

Measures of the risk that a hazardous material poses to the health of an individual who comes into contact with it.

Transportation Area

The area in a Mass Casualty Incident where ambulance and crews are organized to transport patients from treatment area to receiving hospitals.

Transportation Supervisor

The invidual in charge of the transportation sector in a Mass Casualty Incident who assigns patients from the treatment area to awaiting ambulances in the transportation area.

Treatment Area

The location in a mass casualty incident where patients are brought after being triaged and assigned a priority where they are reassessed, treated, and monitored until transport to the hospital.

Treatment Supervisor

The individual, usually a physician, who is in charge of and directs EMS personnel at the treatment area in a mass casualty incident.

Triage

The process of sorting patients based on the severity of injury and medical need to establish treatment and transportation priorities.

Triage Supervisor

The individual in charge of the incident command triage sector who directs the sorting of patients into triage categories in a Mass Casualty Incident.

Unified Command System

A command system used in larger incidents in which there is a multi-agency response or multiple jurisdictions are involved.

Warm Zone

The area located between the hot zone and the cold zone at a hazardous materials incident. The decontamination cooridor is located in the warm zone.

air ambulances - 35

Fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters that have been modified for medical care; used to evacuate and transport patients with life-threatening injuries to treatment facilities.

ambulance - 35

A specialized vehicle for treating and transporting sick and injured patients.

blind spots - 35

Areas of the road that are blocked from the driver''s sight by their own vehicle or mirrors.

cleaning - 35

The process of removing dirt, dust, blood, or other visible contaminants from a surface.

CPR board - 35

A device that provides a firm surface under the patient''s torso.

cushion of safety - 35

Keeping a safe distance between your vehicle and other vehicles to any side of you.

decontaminate - 35

To remove or neutralize radiation, chemical, or other hazardous material from clothing, equipment, vehicles, and personnel.

disinfection - 35

The killing of pathogenic agents by direct application of chemicals.

emergency mode - 35

The use of lights and sirens.

first-responder vehicle - 35

A specialized vehicle used to transport EMS equipment and personnel to the scenes of medical emergencies.

high-level disinfection - 35

The killing of pathogenic agents by using potent means of disinfection.

hydroplaning - 35

A condition in which the tires of a vehicle may be lifted off the road surface as water "piles up" under them, making the vehicle feel as though it is floating.

jump kit - 35

A portable kit containing items that are used in the initial care of the patient.

medivac - 35

Medical evacuation of a patient by helicopter.

spotter - 35

A person who assists a driver in backing up an ambulance in order to compensate for blind spots at the back of the vehicle.

Star of Life - 35

The six-pointed star that identifies vehicles that meet federal specifications as licensed or certified ambulances.

sterilization - 35

A process, such as heating, that removes microbial contamination.

access - 36

The ability to gain entry to an enclosed area and reach a patient.

command post - 36

The location of the incident commander at the scene of an emergency and where command, coordination, control, and communication are centralized.

complex access - 36

Complicated entry that requires special tools and training and includes breaking windows or using other force.

danger zone (hot zone) - 36

An area where individuals can be exposed to sharp metal edges, broken glass, toxic substances, lethal rays, or ignition or explosion of hazardous materials.

disentanglement - 36

The removal of a motor vehicle from around the patient.

entrapment - 36

To be caught (trapped) within a vehicle, room, or container with no way out or to have a limb or other body part trapped.

extrication - 36

Removal of a patient from entrapment or a dangerous situation or position, such as removal from a wrecked vehicle, industrial accident, or building collapse.

hazardous material - 36

Any substance that is toxic, poisonous, radioactive, flammable, or explosive and causes injury or death with exposure.

incident commander - 36

The individual who has overall command of the scene in the field.

self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) - 36

Respirator with independent air supply used by firefighters to enter toxic and otherwise dangerous atmospheres.

simple access - 36

Access that is easily achieved without the use of tools or force.

special weapons and tactics team (SWAT) - 36

A specialized law enforcement tactical unit.

structure fire - 36

A fire in a house, apartment building, office, school, plant, warehouse, or other building.

tactical situation - 36

A hostage, robbery, or other situation in which armed conflict is threatened or shots have been fired and the threat of violence remains.

technical rescue group - 36

A team of individuals from one or more departments in a region who are trained and on call for certain types of technical rescue.

technical rescue situation - 36

A rescue that requires special technical skills and equipment in one of many specialized rescue areas, such as technical rope rescue, cave rescue, and dive rescue.

casualty collection area - 37

An area set up by physicians, nurses, and other hospital staff near a major disaster scene where patients can receive further triage and medical care.

Chemical Transportation Emergency Center (CHEMTREC) - 37

An agency that assists emergency personnel in identifying and handling hazardous materials transport incidents.

command post - 37

The location of the incident commander at the scene of an emergency and where command, coordination, control, and communication are centralized.

danger zone - 37

An area where individuals can be exposed to toxic substances, lethal rays, or ignition or explosion of hazardous materials.

decontamination - 37

The process of removing or neutralizing and properly disposing of hazardous materials from equipment, patients, and rescue personnel.

decontamination area - 37

The designated area in a hazardous materials incident where all patients and rescuers must be decontaminated before going to another area.

disaster - 37

A widespread event that disrupts community resources and functions, in turn threatening public safety, citizens'' lives, and property.

hazardous materials - 37

Any substances that are toxic, poisonous, radioactive, flammable, or explosive and cause injury or death with exposure.

hazardous materials incident - 37

An incident in which a hazardous material is no longer properly contained and isolated.

incident command system - 37

An organizational system to help control, direct, and coordinate emergency responders and resources; also known as an incident management system (IMS).

incident commander - 37

The individual who has overall command of the scene in the field.

mass-casualty incident - 37

An emergency situation involving three or more patients or that can place great demand on the equipment or personnel of the EMS system or has the potential to produce multiple casualties.

mutual aid response - 37

An agreement between neighboring EMS systems to respond to mass-casualty incidents or disasters in each other''s region when local resources are insufficient to handle the response.

personal protective equipment (PPE) levels - 37

Measures of the amount and type of protective equipment that an individual needs to avoid injury during contact with a hazardous material.

rehabilitation area - 37

The area that provides protection and treatment to fire fighters and other personnel working at an emergency. Here, workers are medically monitored and receive any needed care as they enter and leave the scene.

sector commander - 37

The individual delegated to oversee and coordinate activity in an incident command sector; works under the incident commander.

toxicity levels - 37

Measures of the risk that a hazardous material poses to the health of an individual who comes into contact with it.

transportation area - 37

The area in a mass-casualty incident where ambulances and crews are organized to transport patients from the treatment area to receiving hospitals.

transportation officer - 37

The individual in charge of the transportation sector in a mass-casualty incident who assigns patients from the treatment area to awaiting ambulances in the transportation area.

treatment area - 37

Location in a mass-casualty incident where patients are brought after being triaged and assigned a priority, where they are reassessed, treated, and monitored until transport to the hospital.

treatment officer - 37

The individual, usually a physician, who is in charge of and directs EMS personnel at the treatment area in a mass-casualty incident.

triage - 37

The process of establishing treatment and transportation priorities according to severity of injury and medical need.

triage area - 37

Designated area in a mass-casualty incident where the triage officer is located and patients are initially triaged before being taken to the treatment center.

triage officer - 37

The individual in charge of the incident command triage sector who directs the sorting of patients into triage categories in a mass-casualty incident.

alpha - 38

Type of energy that is emitted from a strong radiological source; it is the least harmful penetrating type of radiation and cannot travel fast or through most objects.

anthrax - 38

A deadly bacteria (Bacillus anthracis) that lays dormant in a spore (protective shell); the germ is released from the spore when exposed to the optimal temperature and moisture. The route of entry is inhalation, cutaneous, or gastrointestinal (from consuming food that contains spores).

bacteria - 38

Microorganisms that reproduce by binary fission. These single-cell creatures reproduce rapidly. Some can form spores (encysted variants) when environmental conditions are harsh.

beta - 38

Type of energy that is emitted from a strong radiological source; is slightly more penetrating than alpha, and requires a layer of clothing stop it.

botulinum - 38

Produced by bacteria, this is a very potent neurotoxin. When introduced into the body, this neurotoxin affects the nervous system''s ability to function and causes botulism.

buboes - 38

Enlarged lymph nodes (up to the size of tennis balls) that were characteristic of people infected with the bubonic plague.

bubonic plague - 38

An epidemic that spread throughout Europe in the Middle Ages, causing over 25 million deaths, also called the Black Death, transmitted by infected fleas and characterized by acute malaise, fever, and the formation of tender, enlarged, inflamed lymph nodes that appear as lesions, called buboes.

chlorine (CL) - 38

The first chemical agent ever used in warfare. It has a distinct odor of bleach, and creates a green haze when released as a gas. Initially it produces upper airway irritation and a choking sensation.

communicability - 38

Describes how easily a disease spreads from one human to another human.

contact hazard - 38

A hazardous agent that gives off very little or no vapors; the skin is the primary route for this type of chemical to enter the body; also called a skin hazard.

contagious - 38

A person infected with a disease that is highly communicable.

covert - 38

Act in which the public safety community generally has no prior knowledge of the time, location, or nature of the attack.

cross-contamination - 38

Occurs when a person is contaminated by an agent as a result of coming into contact with another contaminated person.

cyanide - 38

Agent that affects the body''s ability to use oxygen. It is a colorless gas that has an odor similar to almonds. The effects begin on the cellular level and are very rapidly seen at the organ system level.

decay - 38

A natural process in which a material that is unstable attempts to stabilize itself by changing its structure.

dirty bomb - 38

Name given to a bomb that is used as a radiological dispersal device (RDD).

disease vector - 38

An animal that spreads a disease, once infected, to another animal.

dissemination - 38

The means with which a terrorist will spread a disease, for example, by poisoning of the water supply, or aerosolizing the agent into the air or ventilation system of a building.

domestic terrorism - 38

Terrorism carried out by native citizens of the country being attacked.

G agents - 38

Early nerve agents which were developed by German scientists in the period after WWI and into WWII. There are three such agents: sarin, soman, and tabun.

gamma (X-rays) - 38

Type of energy that is emitted from a strong radiological source that is far faster and stronger than alpha and beta rays. These rays easily penetrate through the human body and require either several inches of lead or concrete to prevent penetration.

incubation - 38

Describes the period of time from a person being exposed to a disease to the time when symptoms begin.

international terrorism - 38

Terrorism that is carried out by those not of the host''s country; also known as cross-border terrorism.

ionizing radiation - 38

Energy that is emitted in the form of rays, or particles.

LD50 - 38

The amount of an agent or substance that will kill 50% of people who are exposed to this level.

Lewisite (L) - 38

A blistering agent that has a rapid onset of symptoms and produces immediate intense pain and discomfort on contact.

lymph nodes - 38

Area of the lymphatic system where infection-fighting cells are housed.