Canterbury Tales Quotes

80 terms by ahenderson123 

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Monk

"The Rule of good St. Benet or St. Maur/As old and strict he tended/ He let go by the things of yesterday/And took the modern world's more spacious way"

Monk

"And that a monk uncloistered is a mere/Fish out of water flapping on the pier"

Monk

"I saw his sleeves were garnished at the hand/With fine gray fur, the finest in the land..."

Knight

"To ride abroad had followed chivalry,/Truth, honor, generousness and courtesy"

Knight (van was the part of the army that goes before the rest)

"And jousted for our faith at Tramissene/Thrice in the lists, and always killed his man. This same distinguished ---- had led the van"

Knight

"And in his bearing modest as a maid"

Knight

"He was a true, a perfect gentle-----"

Knight

"Fine horses, but he was not gaily dressed./He wore a fustian tunic stained and dark/With smudges where his armor had left mark"

Squire

"And had done valiantly in little space/ Of time, in hope to win his lady's grace"

Squire

"Singing he was, or fluting all the day;/He was a fresh as is the month of May."

Squire

"Short was his gown, the sleeves were long and wide"

Squire

"He could make songs and poems and recite,/Knew how to joust and dance, to draw and write."

Squire

"He loved so hotly that till dawn grew pale/He slept as little as a nightingale"

Yeoman

"This ---- wore a coat and hood of green,/ And peacock-feathered arrows, bright and keen"

Yeoman

"And in his hand he bore a mighty bow."

Yeoman

"His head was like a nut, his face was brown./He knew the whole of woodcraft up and down."

Yeoman

"A saucy brace was on his arm"

Yeoman

"He was a proper forester I guess"

Nun

"Her greatest oath was only "By St. Loy!""

Nun

"And she spoke daintily in French, extremely, After the school of Stratford-atte-Bowe;/French in the Paris style she did not know"

Nun

"For courtliness she had a special zest,/And she would wipe her upper lip so clean/That not a trace of grease was to be seen"

Nun

"Pleasant and friendly in her wasys, and straining/To counterfeit a courtly king of grace"

Nun

"And she had little dogs she would be feeding/With roasted flesh, or milk, or fine white bread"

Nun

"Her nose was elegant, her eyes glass-gray;/Her mouth was very small, but soft and red,/Her forehead, certainly was fair of spread"

Nun

"She wore a coral trinket on her arm,/A set of beads, the gaudies tricked in green,/Whence hung a golden brooch of brightest sheen"

Friar

"So glib (speaking very readily but insincerely) with gallant phrase and well-tuned speech./He'd fixed up many a marriage, giving each/Of his young women what he could afford her. He was a noble pillar to his Order."

Friar

"Sweetly he heard his penitents at shrift (Confession)/With pleasant absolution (act of freeing someone of a sin or criminal charge), for a gift/He was an easy man in penance-giving/Where he could hope to make a decent living;"

Friar (Talking about indulgences)

"Therefore instead of weeping and of prayer/One should give silver for a poor ----'s care."

Friar

"For he sang well and played the hurdy-gurdy"

Friar

"His neck was whiter than a lily-flower/But strong enough to butt a bruiser down."

Friar

"He knew the taverns well in every town/And every innkeeper and barmaid too/Better than lepers, beggars and that crew,"

Friar

"Of double-worsted was the semi-cope (cape)"

Friar

"He lisped a little out of wantonness/To make his English sweet upon his tongue./When he had played his harp, or having sung."

Friar

"His eyes would twinkle in his head as bright/As any star upon a frosty night./This worthy's name was Hubert, it appeared."

Merchant

"And motley dress, high on his horse he sat"

Merchant

"Upon his head a Flemish beaver hat/And on his feet daintily buckled boots."

Merchant

"He told of his opinions and pursuits/In solemn tones, and how he never lost."

Merchant

"(He thought) upon the Harwich-Holland range, He was expert at currency exchange."

Merchant

"This estimable ---- so had set/His wits to work, none knew he was in debt."

Merchant

"He was an excellent fellow all the same;/To tell the truth I do not know his name"

Oxford Cleric

"Was there; his horse was thinner than a rake,/And he was not too fat, I undertake,"

Oxford Cleric

"But had a hollow look, a sober stare; The thread upon his overcoat was bare."

Oxford Cleric

"He preferred having twenty books in red/And black, of Aristotle's philosophy,/To having fine clothes, fiddle or psaltery."

Oxford Cleric

"His only care was study, and indeed/He never spoke a word more than was need,/Formal at that, respectful in the extreme,/Short to the point, and lofty in his theme."

Oxford Cleric

"The thought of moral virtue filled his speech/And he would gladly learn, and gladly teach."

Sergeant at the Law

"Discreet he was, a man to reverence (respect),/Or so he seemed, his sayings were so wise."

Sergeant at the Law

"Nowhere there was so busy a man as he;/But was less busy than he seemed to be."

Sergeant at the Law

"He wore a homely parti-colored coat/Girt with a silken belt of pin-stipe stuff;"

Franklin

"White as a daisy-petal was his beard"

Franklin

"He loved a morning sop of cake in wind. He lived for pleasure and had always done,/For he was Epicurus' very son,"

Franklin

"As noted as St. Julian was for bounty/He made his household free to all the County."

Franklin

"As Justice at the Sessions none stood hight He often had been Member for the Shire."

Franklin

"As Sheriff he checked audit, every entry./He was a model among landed gentry."

Doctor

"No one alive could talk as well as he did/On points of medicine and of surgery,"

Doctor

"He was a perfect practicing physician"

Doctor

"All his apothecaries in a tribe/Were ready with the drugs he would prescribe,/And each made money from the other's guile;"

Doctor

"He was well-versed in Esculapius too" (God of medicine and healing in Greek mythology (humanism))

Doctor

"He did not read the Bible very much"

Doctor

"In blood-red garments, slashed with bluish-gray/And lined with taffeta, he rode his way;"

Doctor

"And kept the gold he won in pestilences./Gold stimulates the heart, or so we're told/He therefore had a special love of gold."

Wife of Bath

"Her hose were of the finest scarlet red/And gartered tight; her shoes were soft and new."

Wife of Bath

"She'd had five husbands, all at the church door,"

Wife of Bath

"And she had thrice been to Jerusalem, Seen many strange rivers and passed over them..."

Wife of Bath

"She had gap-teeth, set widely, truth to say"

Wife of Bath

"Well wimpled up, and on her head a hat/As broad as is a buckler or a shield"

Wife of Bath

"She had a flowing mantle that concealed/Large hips, her heels spurred sharply under that."

Wife of Bath

"And knew the remedies for love's mischances,/An art in which she knew the oldest dances."

Parson

"He much dislike extorting tithe or fee"

Parson

"Giving to poor parishioners round about/From his own goods and Easter offerings"

Parson

"Yet he neglected not in rain or thunder./In sickness or in grief, to pay a call"

Parson

"First following the word before he taught it"

Parson

"That if gold rust, what then will iron do?/For if a priest be foul in whom we trust/No wonder that a common man should rust;/An shame it is to see-let priests take stock-/A soiled shepherd and a snowy flock."

Parson

"I think there never was a better priest"

Parson

"He sought no pomp or glory in his dealings,/No scrupulosity had spiced his feelings./Christ and His Twelve Apostles and their lord/He taught, but followed it himself before"

Miller

"A great stout fellow big in brawn and bone."

Miller

"Broad, knotty and short-shouldered, he would boast..."

Miller

"And at its very tip, his nose displayed/ A wart on which there stood a tuft of hair./Red as the bristles in an old sow's ear."

Miller

"His mighty mouth was like a furnance door."

Miller

"His was a master-hand at stealing grain."

Miller

"He liked to play his bagpipes up and down/And that was how he brought us out of town."

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