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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Ambiguity-
  2. Aphorism-
  3. Figures of Speech -
  4. Hubris -
  5. Foreshadowing -
  1. a are deliberate departures from the ordinary and literal meanings of words in order to provide fresh, insightful perspectives or emphasis.

    Examples: Simile, Metaphor, Personification, Hyperbole, Etc...
  2. b hints at what is to come.

    Example: Harriet Bird shooting Roy in the pregame section hints at Memo's destruction of him later in life.
  3. c a terse statement of known authorship which expresses a general truth or moral principle. (If the authorship is unknown, the statement is generally considered to be a folk proverb.) This can be a memorable summation of the author's point.

    Example: "If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got."
  4. d the multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage

    Example: The title of the country song "Heaven's Just a Sin Away". At a religious level, it means that committing a sin keeps us out of heaven, but at a physical level, it means that committing a sin (sex) will bring heaven (pleasure).
  5. e insolence, arrogance, or pride. In Greek tragedy, is usually the tragic flaw that leads to his or her downfall.

    Example: Roy Hobbs' overeating, Hamlet's indecision

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. two corresponding pairs arranged not in parallels (a-b-a-b) but in inverted order (a-b-b-a)
    Inverting the second of two phrases that would otherwise be in parallel form.
    Example:
    "I flee who chases me, and chase who flees me."
    -Ovid
  2. involves repeating a word or expression while adding more detail to it, in order to emphasize what otherwise might be passed over.

    Example: "He showed a rather simple taste, a taste for good art, good food, and good friends."
  3. a figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or personified abstraction, such as liberty or love. The effect may add familiarity or emotional intensity.

    Example: William Wordsworth addresses John Milton as he writes, "Milton, thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee."
  4. the repetition of initial consonant sounds, such as "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers."
  5. a sustained comparison, often referred to as a conceit. This is developed throughout a piece of writing.

    Example: "The Flea" by John Donne

5 True/False questions

  1. Antistrophe-a figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or personified abstraction, such as liberty or love. The effect may add familiarity or emotional intensity.

    Example: William Wordsworth addresses John Milton as he writes, "Milton, thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee."

          

  2. Attitude-repetition of the same word or phrase at the end of successive clauses.


    Example: "In 1931, ten years ago, Japan invaded Manchukuo -- without warning. In 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia -- without warning. In 1938, Hitler occupied Austria -- without warning. In 1939, Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia -- without warning. Later in 1939, Hitler invaded Poland -- without warning. And now Japan has attacked Malaya and Thailand -- and the United States --without warning." Franklin D. Roosevelt

          

  3. Epigraph-the use of a quotation at the beginning of a work that hints at its theme.

    Example:
    Hemingway begins The Sun Also Rises with this.

          

  4. Connotation-the literal or dictionary meaning of a word.

    Example: In Frost's "Mending Wall", the wall is the physical boundary separating the two neighbors.

          

  5. Euphony-harsh and discordant sounds in a line or passage in a literary work.

    Example: "And squared and stuck there squares of soft white chalk, And with a fish-tooth, scratched a moon on each."
    Browning, "Caliban Upon Setebos"

          

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