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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Imagery -
  2. Euphemism-
  3. Genre -
  4. Cliché-
  5. Figurative Language -
  1. a anything that affects or appeals to the reader's senses.

    Example:
    so much depends
    upon

    a red wheel
    barrow

    glazed with rain
    water

    beside the white
    chickens.
    -WCW
  2. b the category to which a piece of writing can be classified.

    Example: The Natural is a novel; "The Sick Rose" is a poem
  3. c an overused common expression. The term is derived from a French word for a stereotype printing block. These are typically words and phrases used so frequently that they become stale and ineffective.

    Example: "in less than no time" they "spring to mind," but "in the last analysis," a writer ought to "avoid them like the plague," even though they always seem "to hit the nail on the head."
  4. d a more acceptable and usually more pleasant way of saying something that might be inappropriate or uncomfortable.

    Example: "He went to his final reward" is a common way of saying "he died." These also often used to obscure the reality of a situation. The military uses "collateral damage" to indicate civilian deaths in a military operation.
  5. e the body of devices that uses figures of speech to enable the writer to operate on levels other than the literal one. It includes metaphor, simile, symbol, motif, and hyperbole, etc.

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. a work that functions on a symbolic level.
    Example: "Lord of the Flies", "Animal Farm", and Pilgrim's Progress
  2. the presentation of two contrasting images. The ideas are balanced by word, phrase, clause, or paragraphs.

    Example: "To be or not to be..." "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country..."
  3. a fanciful expression, usually in the form of an extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects. This term displays intellectual cleverness due to the unusual comparison being made.

    Example: "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day?" William Shakespeare. In this poem, Shakespeare compares a woman to beautiful summer day - two seemingly disparate things.
  4. a particular kind of dialect; the use of slang in writing, often to create local color and to provide an informal tone. Mark Twain often uses this.

    Example: "Hey Ya'll, I live in Alabama."
  5. a form of ellipse by which a speaker comes to an abrupt halt, seemingly overcome by passion (fear, excitement, etc.) or modesty.

    Example: "why, you..." "Why, I'll..." Get out, or else--"

5 True/False Questions

  1. Hubris -a character who, by displaying opposite traits, emphasizes certain aspects of another character.

    Example: Mercutio is this to Romeo. He is witty and lighthearted, while Romeo is gloomy.

          

  2. Comic Relief-the inclusion of a humorous character or scene to contrast with the tragic elements of a work, thereby intensifying the next tragic event.

    Example: Ron Weasley in Harry Potter. Ron acts as the sidekick to Harry providing breaks to the scenes of intense tension.

          

  3. Anaphora-a literary device employed to serve as a basis for comparison. It is assumed that what applies to the parallel situation also applies to the original circumstance. In other words, it is the comparison between two different items.

    Example: UNCLE is to NEPHEW as AUNT is to NIECE
    WATCH is to WRIST as STILETTOS is to FEET

          

  4. Generalizations-are assertions or conclusions based on some specific instances. The value of a this is determined by the quality and quantity of examples on which it is based.

    Example: All dogs hate cats

          

  5. Form -a character who, by displaying opposite traits, emphasizes certain aspects of another character.

    Example: Mercutio is this to Romeo. He is witty and lighthearted, while Romeo is gloomy.

          

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