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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Ambiguity-
  2. Figures of Speech -
  3. Concrete-
  4. Allusion-
  5. Deduction-
  1. a the process of moving from a general rule to a specific example.

    Example: All men are mortal. Socrates is a man. Therefore, Socrates is mortal.
  2. b the multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage

    Example: The title of the country song "Heaven's Just a Sin Away". At a religious level, it means that committing a sin keeps us out of heaven, but at a physical level, it means that committing a sin (sex) will bring heaven (pleasure).
  3. c a reference contained in a work.
    Example: "To act or not to act, that was Maria's dilemma" (reference to Shakespeare)
  4. d are deliberate departures from the ordinary and literal meanings of words in order to provide fresh, insightful perspectives or emphasis.

    Examples: Simile, Metaphor, Personification, Hyperbole, Etc...
  5. e words describe things that exist and can be experienced through the senses. Abstractions are rendered understandable and specific through these kinds of examples.

    Example: "The apparition of these faces in the croed; Petals on a wet, black bough."
    Ezra Pound

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. two corresponding pairs arranged not in parallels (a-b-a-b) but in inverted order (a-b-b-a)
    Inverting the second of two phrases that would otherwise be in parallel form.
    Example:
    "I flee who chases me, and chase who flees me."
    -Ovid
  2. the recreation of regional spoken language.

    Example: Jim is jus' ez happy ez Ah is.
  3. repetition of the same sound in words close together.

    Example: Fleet feet sweet by sleeping geese.
  4. the inclusion of a humorous character or scene to contrast with the tragic elements of a work, thereby intensifying the next tragic event.

    Example: Ron Weasley in Harry Potter. Ron acts as the sidekick to Harry providing breaks to the scenes of intense tension.
  5. is the choice of words used in speaking or writing. It is frequently divided into four levels: formal, informal, colloquial, and slang.

    Examples: I Love You
    formal -
    informal -
    colloquial -
    slang -

5 True/False Questions

  1. Connotation-the interpretive level of a word based on its associated images rather than its literal meaning.

    Example: The wall in Frost's "Mending Wall" refers to the emotional barrier which prevents interaction between neighbors.

          

  2. Antistrophe-a figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or personified abstraction, such as liberty or love. The effect may add familiarity or emotional intensity.

    Example: William Wordsworth addresses John Milton as he writes, "Milton, thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee."

          

  3. Denotation-the interpretive level of a word based on its associated images rather than its literal meaning.

    Example: The wall in Frost's "Mending Wall" refers to the emotional barrier which prevents interaction between neighbors.

          

  4. Anecdote-words describe things that exist and can be experienced through the senses. Abstractions are rendered understandable and specific through these kinds of examples.

    Example: "The apparition of these faces in the croed; Petals on a wet, black bough."
    Ezra Pound

          

  5. Genre -the category to which a piece of writing can be classified.

    Example: The Natural is a novel; "The Sick Rose" is a poem

          

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