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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. polis
  2. tyrants
  3. hoplites
  4. Archimedes
  5. helots
  1. a in ancient Sparta, this was the term for the slaves that were owned by the state
  2. b heavily armed Greek infantrymen who marched and fought in close ranks; most of the recruits were middle-class citizens
  3. c (287-212 BCE) Greek mathematician and inventor. He wrote works on plane and solid geometry, arithmetic, and mechanics. He is best known for the lever and pulley.
  4. d a self-governing city-state; the basic political unit of the Greek world. The polis comprised a city, with its acropolis and agora and the surrounding territory.
  5. e in ancient Greece, rulers who seized power by force but who ruled with the people's support; later came to refer to rulers who exercise brutal and oppressive power

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. Greek city-state that was ruled by an oligarchy, focused on military, used slaves for agriculture, discouraged the arts
  2. one of Socrates' students; was considered by many to be the GREATEST philosopher of western civilization. Plato explained his ideas about government in a work entitled The Republic. In his ideal state, the people were divided into three different groups.
  3. term referring to the period of Greek history that begins with the defeat of the Persian invaders in 480 - 479 BC and ends with Alexander the Great's accession in 336 BC or with his death in 323 BC.
  4. Greek epic poems attributed to Homer; defined relations of gods and humans that shaped Greek mythology.
  5. confederation of Greek city-states under the leadership of Athens. The name is used to designate two distinct periods of alliance, the first 478-404 B.C., the second 378-338 B.C. The first alliance was made between Athens and a number of Ionian states (chiefly maritime) for the purpose of prosecuting the war against Persia.

5 True/False Questions

  1. Periclesa self-governing city-state; the basic political unit of the Greek world. The polis comprised a city, with its acropolis and agora and the surrounding territory.

          

  2. natural lawLiterally "high point of the city." The upper fortified part of an ancient Greek city, usually devoted to religious purposes.

          

  3. Cleisthenesfor many centuries the most powerful of all ancient Greek city-states; capital of present day Greece

          

  4. phonetic alphabetan alphabet of characters intended to represent specific sounds of speech

          

  5. AristotleGreek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.

          

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