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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. perceptual equivalence
  2. quasi-picture view
  3. parallel processing
  4. transformational equivalence
  5. Indeterminacy
  1. a -imaging is like seeing (with a "mind's eye"); the same 'visual screen' is used
    1. Perky's (1910) tomato/leaf/banana experiment

    2. Farah (1985), like Perky (1910), found that Ss found it easier to perceive a low-contrast letter (an H or a T) if they had been imaging that letter.
  2. b -The processing of several aspects of a problem simultaneously; the brain's natural mode of information processing for many functions, including vision. Contrasts with the step-by-step (serial) processing of most computers and of conscious problem solving. (Myers Psychology 8e p. 210)
  3. c (Shepard, Kosslyn, Finke)

    -mental images are Analog/ Geometric representations of visual stimuli; and are "functional isomorphs" to Euclidean space (Shepard)

    -*visual imaging is functionally equivalent to seeing, with our "mind's eye"
  4. d -Images leave out significant details, and cannot be re-analyzed for those details the way that pictures can.
    *E.g., image of a tiger does not specify an exact number of stripes
  5. e -images can be scanned, rotated, etc. in the same way as actual pictures or spatial stimuli
    E.g., "mentally" walking around one's house
    1. Mental Rotation
    a. Letter Rotation
    --when NOT told to use imagery (Cooper & Shepard, 1973)

    ***pictured: normal F and rotated F***

    --when told explicitly to use imagery (Cooper, 1976): start rotating figure; closer the second letter was to calculated orientation, faster the RT.
    b. Block Figures Rotation in 2- and 3-dimensions (Shepard & Metzler, 1971)

    ***pictured: 3D block configurations***

    c. Polygon rotation independent of stimulus complexity (Cooper, 1975)

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. -spatial relations can be implicitly represented in a picture/ image (without explicit attention ever having been paid to the spatial relations).
  2. -a mental representation that mirrors or resembles the thing it represents; mental images can occur in many and perhaps all sensory modalities
  3. -A term used in logic to describe the content of assertions. Assertions are non-linguistic abstractions from sentences and can be evaluated as either true or false.
    -The nature of ____________ is highly controversial amongst philosophers, many of whom are skeptical about the existence of _____________.
    -Many logicians prefer to avoid use of the term, in favour of using sentences
  4. States that imagery is like perception, in that images retain some of the sensory qualities of perception.

    -There is a more or less direct relationship between representation and referent.
    -Spatial relationships are also directly captured.
    -Relations represented implicitly.
    -Different kind of representation for each sense.
  5. **key idea: images can be scanned, in much the same way as physical percepts can be
    - imaginal scanning is functionally equivalent to peceptual scanning

    -Kosslyn's experiment: participants were shown a map of an imaginary island, participants studied until they can reproduce it accurately from memory
    -instructed that on hearing name of an object on the island, they should picture the map, mentally scan directly to the mentioned object, and finally press a key as soon as they arrived at the location of the named object
    • Results: almost perfect linear relationship between the distances separating successive pairs of objects in the mental map and the amount of time it took participants to press the button
    • -in other words, participants seem to have encoded the map in the form of an image

5 True/False Questions

  1. intramodal interference-the structure of Images is like that of actual perceived objects, and can be re-organized & re-interpreted.

    -Images are analogous to 2-1/2 D sketches.
    --Images are assembled; assembly based on description (and interpretation) of component parts
    --more complex images take longer to generate

          

  2. serial processing-The processing of several aspects of a problem simultaneously; the brain's natural mode of information processing for many functions, including vision. Contrasts with the step-by-step (serial) processing of most computers and of conscious problem solving. (Myers Psychology 8e p. 210)

          

  3. conceptual-propositional theoryA. Theoretical Claims:
    1. ALL information stored in Propositional codes
    --sentence-like: CHASED (Dog, Cat)

    --it is these propositional codes which do all the work when we answer visual-spatial questions?

    2. All spatial information must be Explicitly represented, or able to be inferred from other explicitly-stated propositions:
    BEHIND (Jim, Todd)
    BEHIND (Annie, Jim)
    Therefore, .....


    3. All information stored is conceptually dependent.
    -E.g., Piaget's children without knowledge of
    Geocentric levels in tilted beaker experiment

    4. Epiphenomenalism: though people may have a subjective experience of having generated an image, the image itself is non-causal to being able to answer an imagery-type question

          

  4. structural equivalence-Represents like pictures (not like sentences).
    -Location, size, and distance are arranged in an image as they are in physical space.
    --spatial relations among objects in an array are preserved

    --1) Intramodal Interference
    ------Kosslyn: image & perception share a "visual buffer"
    --------a. Brooks (1968)
    ----------Visual/Verbal Task x Visual/Verbal Response

          

  5. image generation(Kosslyn, Reiser, Farah, Fliegel, 1983)

    -a. Takes longer to construct more detailed images, or those described as having more parts, e.g., "two overlapping rectangles" vs. "five squares in form of a cross"

    Or,
    -----Four columns of dots, 3 per column, vs. Three rows of dots, 4 per row


    -b. The smaller the image size (or smaller the part/detail asked about), the longer the RT

    --does a rabbit have ears, vs.does a rabbit have whiskers? (more obvious in our image generation that a rabbit has ears)

    (also structural equivalence)

          

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