Abnormal Gait Patterns

Created by tobisuekraus 

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Antalgic

A protective gait pattern where the involved step lenth is decreased in order to avoit weight bearing on the involved side usually secondary to pain.

Ataxic

A gait pattern characterized by staggering and unsteadiness. There is usually a wide base of support and movements are exaggerated.

Cerebellar

A staggering gait pattern seen in cerebellar disease.

Double Step

A gait pattern in which alternate steps of a different length or at a different rate.

Equine

A gait pattern characterized by high steps, usually involves excessive activity of the gastrocnemius.

Festinating

A gait pattern where a patient walks on toes as though pushed. It starts slowly, increases, and may continue until the patient grasps an object in order to stop.

Hemiplegic

A gait pattern in which patient abduct the paralyzed limb, swing it around, and bring it forward so the foot comes to the ground in front of them.

Parkinsonian

A gait pattern in marked by increased forward flexion of the trunk and knees, gait is shuffling with quick and small steps, festinating may occur.

Scissor

A gain pattern in which the legs cross mid-line upon advancement.

Spastic

A gait pattern with stiff movements, toes seeming to catch and drag, legs held together, hip and knees slightly flexed. Commonly seen in spastic paraplegia.

Steppage

A gait pattern in which the feet and toes are lifted through hip and knee flexion to excessive heights; usually secondary to dorsiflexor weakness. The foot will slap at initial contact with the ground secondary to decreased control.

Tabetic

A high stepping ataxic gain in which the feet slap the ground.

Trendelenburg

A gait pattern that denotes gluteus medius weakness; excessive lateral trunk flexion and weight shifting over the stance leg.

Vaulting

A gait pattern where the swing leg advances by compensating through the combination of elevation of the pelvis and plantar flexion of the stance leg.

Abnormal Gait Patterns

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