Poetry Terms

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62 terms

Speaker

the narrator of a poem

Occasion

an aspect of context; the cause or reason for writing

Audience

the intended reader of a piece

Purpose

one's intention or objective in a speech or piece of writing

Subject

tells who or what the writing is about

Tone

the writer's or speaker's attitude toward the subject of a story, toward a character, or toward the audience (the readers).

Alliteration

repetition of initial consonant sounds

Onomatopoeia

the use of words that imitate sounds

Repetition

repeated use of sounds, words, or ideas for effect and emphasis

Imagery

Description that appeals to the senses (sight, sound, smell, touch, taste)

Apostrophe

a technique by which a writer addresses an inanimate object, an idea, or a person who is either dead or absent.

Oxymoron

conjoining contradictory terms (as in 'deafening silence')

Personification

A figure of speech in which an object or animal is given human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes

Extended Metaphor

a metaphor which extends over several lines or an entire poem

Hyperbole

extreme exaggeration

Metonymy

substituting the name of an attribute or feature for the name of the thing itself (as in 'I pledge allegiance to the flag')

Synecdoche

using a part of something to represent the whole thing

Masculine Rhyme

rhyme that falls on the stressed and concluding syllables of the rhyme-words. Examples include "keep" and "sleep," "glow" and "no," and "spell" and "impel."

Feminine Rhyme

is a rhyme that matches two or more syllables at the end of the respective lines (painted-acquainted, passion-fashion)

Slant Rhyme

rhyme in which the vowel sounds are nearly, but not exactly the same (i.e. the words "stress" and "kiss"); sometimes called half-rhyme, near rhyme, or partial rhyme

Perfect Rhyme

a rhyme in which the corrsondance between the two sounds is exact

Terminal Rhyme

Perfect rhyme where the grammatical end of the line or thought coincides with the perfect rhyme.

Internal Rhyme

repetition of sounds within a line (but not at the end of the line)

Rhyme Scheme

the pattern of rhymes at the ends of lines in a poem

Assonance

repetition of vowel sounds

Dissonance

disagreeable sounds

Consonance

the repetition of consonants (or consonant patterns) especially at the ends of words. ex: ping-pong, sound-sand, round-rind

Meter

patterns of regular rhythm in language

Foot

a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm

Syllable

A unit of speech heard as a single sound; one "beat" of a word or phrase.

Stressed

bearing a stress or accent

Unstressed

syllables that are not given a relative emphasis

Rhythm

the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements

Scansion

The process of marking lines of poetry to show the type of feet and the number of feet they contain

Pentameter

five feet per line (10 syllables per line of poetry)

Hexameter

six feet per line (12 syllables per line of poetry)

Iambic

one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable (tra-PEZE)

Sonnet

a short poem with fourteen lines, usually ten-syllable rhyming lines, divided into two, three, or four sections

Ode

a poem usually addressed to a particular person, object or event that has stimulated deep and noble feelings in the poet

Elegy

a sad or mournful poem (usually because of a death)

Blank Verse

unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter)

Free Verse

Poetry that does not have a regular meter or rhyme scheme

Stanza

a group of lines in a poem

Couplet

two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme

Triplet

three line stanza

Quatrain

a stanza of four lines

Cinquain

A five line stanza

Enjambed

the running over of a sentence or thought into the next line without a pause

End-Stopped

a term that describes a line of poetry that ends with a natural pause often indicated by a mark of punctuation

Caesura

a pause or break within a line of poetry (marked with || symbol)

Elision

The leaving out of an unstressed syllable or vowel, usually in order to keep a regular meter in a line of poetry.

Monometer

a metrical line containing one foot

Dimeter

a metrical line containing two feet

Trimeter

a metrical line with three feet

Tetrameter

a metrical line containing four feet

Hexameter

a metrical line containing six feet

Heptameter (septameter)

a metrical line containing seven feet

Trochaic (trochee)

one stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable (PUMP-kin)

Spondaic (spondee)

A metrical foot consisting of two stressed syllables. (PAN-CAKE)

Pyrrhic (pyrrhus)

a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed syllables (of the)

Anapestic (anapest)

metrical measurement of two unstressed syllables and then one stressed one (an-a-PEST))

Dactyllic (dactyl)

A metrical foot consisting of a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables (MAR-ma-lade)

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