Barron's SAT words in a Flash 03

30 terms by Garcia_cui

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digression

1.Some students in history class think Mr.Romano's digression are a waster of time,but i enjoy them because i learn interesting facts that aren't in the textbook.
2.Avoid digressions when you write an essay;teachers expect your writing to be focused and free of irrelevant information.
3.The judge instructed the witness to stop digressing and stick to the main events in her account of the incident.

diligence

1.Learning a foreign language requires diligence on the part of a student.
2.Diligence is only one of the requirements for success;another is the application of intelligence.
3.Work diligently in all your subjects so that you can reach your full potential.

disclose

1.For tax purposes,the government requires that anyone earning an income disclose its source.
2.A journalist can sometimes obtain information from a person if the journalist agrees not to disclose the source of that information.
3.Aunt Becky has never disclosed the name of the man she was going to be married to thirty years ago but who died in a car crash just before the wedding.

discount

1.Until someone saw him having dinner with a woman in a restaurant,the students discounted the rumor that the school's oldest bachelor,Mr.Leonard,was going to be married.
2.The report discounted the story he was told because it contradicted all the other information he had about the situation.
3.People who work for intelligence services such as CIA must learn what information they should discount and which they should analyze carefully.

discrimination

1.A discriminating reader,Ms.Hansen chooses books that haven been highly praised by respected reviewers.
2.Lucy's parents want her to become more discriminating in her choice of boyfriends.
3.Gail has discriminating taste in chocolate; she can tell with one bite if a piece of chocolate is high quality.

disdain

1.The soldier was treated with disdain by his comrades because he fled the battle after the first shot was fired.
2.Dishonest individuals are regarded with disdain by most people.
3.In summarizing what the convicted man had done,the dudge made no attempt to hide her disdain for a person who would abandon his own children.

disinclination

1.Mr.Tanner's son Ike told his father that he had a disinclination to spend a beautiful Saturday afternoon mowing the lawn.His father's reply was "That's fine,as long as you understand that i will then have a disinclination to pay your allowance this week."
2.Arthur,a sightly built young man,has a disinclination to participate in sports involving physical contact.
3.I have a disinclination to help you because you didn't help me when i was having difficulties.

disputatious

1.Mary seems naturally disputatious;she takes an extreme position on every issue.
2.Phil has hardly a disputatious bone in his body;he'll agree with practically everything you say.
3.The Disputatious customer disagreed with everything that she was told by the manager.

dissent

1.No one dissented, so the motion was passed unanimously.
2.Courage is often required for a person to dissent from the opinion of the majority.
3.Justice Smith wrote the dissenting opinion for the minority.

divergent

1.Sandra and Peter took divergent approaches to solving the equation,but both arrived at the correct answer.
2.Paul and Sylvester were good friends in high school,but their lives took divergent paths after high school.Paul enlisted in the Navy and sails around the world,while Sylvester has settled down in our hometown.
3.It's often more interesting to listen to a discussion between experts with divergent views than to a discussion in which similar views are expressed.

document

1.The job of a biographer is made easier if the subject has documented his or her life.
2.The historical society has started a project to document the history of our town.
3.Dad likes document our summer vacation trip by recording highlights with his video camera.

dogmatic

1.A good book reviewer is flexible and not not dogmatic in his or her views about what makes a book worthwhile.
2.A good scientist can't be dogmatic in evaluating evidence.
3.One goal of education is to make people less dogmatic and more open to different viewpoint.

eclectic

1.Lionel has an eclectic collection of model trains from all over the world.
2.The works of the writer Isaac Asimov demonstrate that he had remarkably eclectic interests ;they cover practically every subject imaginable, from Shakespeare to nuclear physics.
3.Dr. McAllister owns an eclectic collection of art from all over the world.

egotism

1.A good definition of growing up is losing your egotism and becoming more concerned about the needs of other people.
2.It could be hard to avoid egotism if you get straight As, have the lead in the school play,received a perfect score on the SAT,and have been selected for the all-state basketball team.
3.Some people are so egotistical that they hardly listen to what other people say,preferring instead to talk almost constantly.

elated

1.The new author was elated to see her first book in print.
2.I was elated when my son phoned me to say that his wife had delivered a healthy baby girl.
3.The members of our debating team were elated when they won the state high school debating championship.

elegy

1.Deeply saddened by the death of his young son,the poet Ben Johnson wrote an elegy to him
2.P.B. Shelley's poem "Adonais" is an elegy mourning the death of John Keats at the age of twenty-five.
3.One of the great elegies in American literature is Walt Whitman's "When Lilacs in the Dooryard Bloom'd," a moving poem for President Abraham Lincoln.

elusive

1.My brother,an enthusiastic surfer, goes out to the ocean with his board every weekend in search of the elusive "perfect wave."
2.Evidence for the existence of intelligent life outside of Earth has proved elusive.
3."Alley Cat" AL is an elusive fellow;first he escaped from police custody,then he eluded a statewide manhunt.

embellish

1.Sarah embellished her living room with vases she had collected in her travels all over the world.
2.According to a recent survey,nearly half of all job applications admit to embellishing their qualifications.
3.A journalist should not embellish a story to make it more interesting to the reader.

emulate

1.In Aesop's fable"The tortoise and the Hare," the reader is asked to emulate the tortoise;the lesson is,"Slow and steady wins the race."
2.Jim's mother wanted her son to emulate his father Jumbo Jim in all but one area-his tendency to overeat.
3.After Sharon finishes her medical training,she plans to emulate her father and become a general practitioner in a rural area.

enmity

1.A feud within a family sometimes causes greater enmity than one between people aren't related.
2.The U.S.Civil War caused great enmity between North and South that persists in some forms to this day.
3.No enmity exists between the two rivals for the middleweight boxing championship,but each boxer does have a healthy respect for the skills of the other.

ephemeral

1.Most of the writing that appears in newspapers is ephemeral.
2.In comparison to the billions of years that the universe has existed, the life of each living thing seems ephemeral.
3.Much slang is ephemeral,but some words-such as phony-become part of standard English.

equivocal

1.Debaters normally can't take an equivocal position if they want to win;they must take a definite position either for or against motion proposed.
2.The judge demanded that the witness give a definite "yes" or "no" answer,but received only an equivocal "maybe".
3.Politicians sometimes give equivocal responses to questions in order to avoid having their position on an issue "pinned down".

eulogy

1.At the funeral of her beloved grandmother,Donna read a eulogy she had written to her.
2.Jim gave what might well be the shortest eulogy in history at his friend's funeral: "He was a pretty cool dude."
3.This biography of Abraham Lincoln isn't merely a eulogy to him;it examines his weaknesses as well as the qualities that made him a great president.

evanescent

1.Thoughts are often evanescent,coming into the mind for an instant and then vanishing as quickly as they came.
2.Tim joined a monastery because he believes that worldly happiness is evanescent,whereas spiritual happiness is eternal.
3.The artist is trying to capture the evanescent play of sunlight on the surface of the lake.

exalt

1.The combat hero was exalted in his hometown when he returned home from the war.
2.Having been made Bishop at the age of forty,Father Watson believed he would one day reach the exalted position of Cardinal.
3.When the college of Cardinals selects a Pope,he is exalted ablove all other Roman Catholics.

exemplary

1.Although i don't agree with the book's argument,i admit that it's written in an exemplary manner.
2.The town council voted to recognize Ms.Miller's thirty years of exemplary service as town clerk with a special ceremony.
3.My English teacher said that my essay was exemplary and that he would read it to the class to illustrate the qualities of a good essay.

exuberance

1.Pat could hardly contain her exuberance after she saw her score on the SAT;it meant she would be accepted at the college she always wanted to attend.
2.When Ted finally got the chance to play in a college football game after spending three years as backup quarterback,he played with so much exuberance that he inspired his team to a come-from-behind victory.
3.The book reviewer hailed the new novel as "celebrating the vitality,exuberance,and optimism of the American people."

facilitate

1.To facilitate the investigation into its hiring practices,the company made its personnel records available to government officials.
2.The governor's order that nonessential vehicles stay off the roads facilitated the movement of relief supplies into the flooded area.
3.The dictator refused to facilitate UN inspections of his country's nuclear weapons.

fallow

1.The field has lain fallow for so many years that people are beginning to wonder if its owner is planning to sell it to property developers.
2.On the first day of class,Professional Williams looked out at the faces of the freshmen in his literature class, and thought,"The minds of these students are like fallow fields waiting for me to plant in them the seeds of knowledge."
3.Mr.Jones decided to let ten acres of his farmland lie fallow this year.

fanaticism

1.Moderates believe that fanaticism is dangerous because it divides people into opposing,often hostile,group.
2.Miranda's fanaticism in imitating the dress of her favorite pop singer is beginning to worry her parents.
3.Uncle Jim is a fanatical follower of the Chicago Cubs baseball team;he attends nearly every game,even away games.

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