Public speaking - Chapter 15

16 terms by andrewstevenlong 

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persuasion

the process of creating, reinforcing, or changing people's beliefs or actions

mental dialogue with the audience

the mental give-and-take between speaker and listener during a persuasive speech

target audience

the portion of the whole audience that the speaker most wants to persuade

question of fact

a question about the truth or falsity of an assertion

question of value

a question about the worth, rightness, morality, and so forth of an idea or action

question of policy

a question about whether a specific course of action should or should not be taken

speech to gain passive agreement

a persuasive speech in which the speaker's goal is to convince the audience that a given policy is desirable without encouraging the audience to take action in support of the policy

speech to gain immediate action

a persuasive speech in which the speaker's goal is to convince the audience to take action in support of a given policy

need

the first basic issue in analyzing a question of policy: Is there a serious problem or need that requires a change from current policy?

burden of proof

the obligation facing a persuasive speaker to prove that a change from current policy is necessary

plan

the second basic issue in analyzing a question of policy: If there is a problem with current policy, does the speaker have a plan to solve the problem?

practicality

the third basic issue in analyzing a question of policy: Will the speaker's plan solve the problem? Will it create new and more serious problems?

problem-solution order

a method of organizing persuasive speeches in which the first main point deals with the existence of a problem and the second main point presents a solution to the problem

problem-cause-solution order

a method of organizing persuasive speeches in which the first main point identifies a problem, the second main point analyzes the causes of the problem, and the third main point presents a solution to the problem

comparative advantages order

a method of organizing persuasive speeches in which each main point explains why a speaker's solution to a problem is preferable to other proposed solutions

Monroe's motivated sequence

a method of organizing persuasive speeches that seek immediate action: the five steps of the motivated sequence are attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action

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