NAME

Question types


Start with


Question limit

of 55 available terms

Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads
Print test

5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. proceed
  2. precede
  3. tranquil
  4. hearsay
  5. eradicate
  1. a n. unverified information received from other people; rumor; gossip.
    It's not a good idea to make major decisions based only on rumors and hearsay.
  2. b adj. calm; peaceful; serene; placid.
    Her family retreats to their lake house to relax and take in the tranquil beauty of the water.
  3. c v. to destroy completely; to put an end to.
    Smallpox was once a widespread disease, but it has been eradicated by modern vaccines.
    --------
    eradication (n.)
  4. d v. to come before (something).
    The beginning of the game was preceded by the singing of the national anthem.
    --------
    precedent
    n. an earlier event that is regarded as an example or model to be followed in the future
    --------
    unprecedented
    adj. never done or known before; unheard of.
    After the huge snowstorm, the school took the unprecedented step of closing for an entire week.
    --------
    precedence
    n. the condition of being considered more important than something else; priority.
    I'd like you to clean the basement at some point, but getting the car fixed promptly takes precedence over that project.
  5. e v. to begin or continue a course of action; to move forward

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. n. an opinion contrary to orthodox religious doctrine or what is generally accepted; blasphemy.
    The fundamentalist religious leader denounced the doctrine of the atheists as heresy.
  2. adj. important; famous; attention-catching; noticeable.
    The prominent author's appearance at the local bookstore drew a huge crowd.
    --------
    prominence (n.)
  3. adj. treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humor; flippant; frivolous.
    Don't worry—I was just being facetious when I said I'd sold your pet rabbit to the dog food factory.
  4. n. an indirect reference; an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly.
    The author's mention of a "jabberwocky" was an allusion to Alice in Wonderland, but most readers missed the reference.
  5. v. to engage in plots and intrigues; to scheme.
    Hoping to devise a plan to steal identities over the web, Harry and Kim sat in the back room and machinated.
    --------
    machination
    n. a scheme

5 True/False questions

  1. concur(1) v. to be of the same opinion; to agree.
    The judge concurred with the plaintiff and awarded her a $2 million settlement.

    (2) v. to happen or occur at the same time; to coincide

          

  2. lugubriousadj. eager or quick to argue, quarrel, or fight; combative; belligerent; bellicose.
    Ben's pugnacious attitude gets him in fights all the time.

          

  3. opportuneadj. (of a time) well-chosen or particularly favorable or appropriate; auspicious; felicitous.
    Julia chose an opportune time to open her new vegetarian restaurant, just as people were becoming particularly interested in healthy eating.
    --------
    opportunist
    n. a person who exploits circumstances to gain immediate advantage rather than being guided by consistent principles or plans
    --------
    opportunism (n.)
    --------
    opportunistic (adj.)

          

  4. trivial(1) adj. perfect; most suitable.
    The empty parking lot is ideal for driving practice.

    (2) n. a standard of perfection; a principle to be aimed at.
    I try to stay true to my ideal of treating everyone with kindness.
    --------
    idealism
    n. the practice of pursuing ideals, especially unrealistically
    --------
    idealist (n.)
    --------
    idealize
    v. to regard as perfect or better than in reality
    --------
    ideologue
    n. a supporter of an ideology or system of beliefs, especially someone who is uncompromising and dogmatic.
    The government can barely accomplish anything because it's full of ideologues who refuse to cooperate with each other.

          

  5. methodologyadj. (of a person) unwilling to believe something; skeptical; doubtful.
    She arched her eyebrow and gave him an incredulous look when he insisted that the tree had just appeared in front of the car.
    --------
    incredulity (n.)
    --------
    credulity
    n. a tendency to be too ready to believe that something is real or true.
    I'm afraid that Trey's credulity may someday get him in trouble because he will trust anything you tell him.

          

Create Set