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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. McGuffey Readers
  2. Walden
  3. "Letter from Birmingham Jail"
  4. The Jungle
  5. The Other America
  1. a 1846; William Holmes McGuffey; Also known as Eclectic Reader. The best known and most widely-used reading instruction books in the nineteenth century. It is estimated that this time four-fifths of all American school children used McGuffey readers.
    The McGuffey Readers featured stories, poems, and essays supporting patriotism and moral values.
  2. b 1962; Michael Harrington; Poignant and influential report on poverty in America. The book played an important role in awakening JFK's interest in the poor and showed the way for LBJ's War on Poverty.
  3. c 1963; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; Dr. King argued that citizens have "a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws." Civil disobedience is thus a justified response to unjust laws.
  4. d 1906; Upton Sinclair; The novel exposed appalling conditions in the Chicago meatpacking industry. It was a classic example of a muckraking novel. The novel helped bring about passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act of 1906.
  5. e 1854; Henry David Thoreau; The novel espoused transcendentalism—that is, truth through inner reflection and exposure to nature. It recorded Thoreau's thoughts concerning the value of a life of simplicity and contemplation.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. (1867-1899); Horatio Alger Jr.; This is a collection of approximately 270 dime novels. Alger's novels feature rags-to-riches stories describing how down-and-out boys become rich and successful through hard work, honesty, and a little luck.
  2. 1962; Rachel Carson; Her work protested the contamination of the air, land, and water with chemical insecticides such as DDT. The novel played a key role in sparkling the environmental movement in the United States.
  3. 1893; Frederick Jackson Turner; He argued that the development of American individualism and democracy was shaped by the frontier experience. Turner's "frontier thesis" focused on the importance of the absence of a feudal aristocracy. In other words, America did not have a hereditary landed nobility. Here is a famous excerpt: "From the beginning of the settlement of America, the frontier regions have exercised a steady influence toward democracy. . . . American democracy is fundamentally the outcome of the experience of the American people in dealing with the West."
  4. Key writers included Sinclair Lewis and F. Scott Fitzgerald; Called this because they were disillusioned with American society during the 1920s. They criticized main-class conformity and materialism. For example, Sinclair Lewis criticized middle-class life in novels such as Babbitt and Main Street. Harlem Renaissance, 1920s. Key writers included Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Josephine Baker, and James Weldon Johnson. They created distinctive African American literature. Writers expressed pride in their African American culture.
  5. 1890; Jacob Riis was the author; Riis was a journalist and photographer working primarily in New York City. Riis's book provided poignant pictures that gave a human face to the poverty and despair experienced by immigrants living in the New York City's Lower East Side

5 True/False questions

  1. Leaves of Grass1855; Walt Whitman; Whitman's poems featured the Romantic movement's revolt against reason and embrace of nature

          

  2. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz1900; L. Frank Baum; Originally written as a political commentary on free silver and the plight of American farmers.
    The Ashcan School of Art, early 1900s This was a group of eight American artists, led by John Sloan. Focused on depicting urban scenes such as crowded tenements and boisterous barrooms.

          

  3. The Organization Man1831; William Lloyd Garrison; It called for the "immediate and uncompensated emancipation of the slaves." Famous quote: " Let Southern oppressors tremble. . . I will be as harsh as Truth and as uncompromising as Justice. . . I am in earnest - I will not retreat a single inch—and I WILL BE HEARD!"

          

  4. The Last of the Mohicans1962; Michael Harrington; Poignant and influential report on poverty in America. The book played an important role in awakening JFK's interest in the poor and showed the way for LBJ's War on Poverty.

          

  5. The Influence of Sea Power upon History1890; Captain Alfred Mahan; He argued that control of the sea was the key to world dominance. The book was very influential in promoting the growth of U.S. naval power during the late nineteenth century.

          

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