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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Pragmatism
  2. Walden
  3. The Liberator
  4. "Civil Disobedience: On the Duty of Civil Disobedience"
  5. Jazz
  1. a 1854; Henry David Thoreau; The novel espoused transcendentalism—that is, truth through inner reflection and exposure to nature. It recorded Thoreau's thoughts concerning the value of a life of simplicity and contemplation.
  2. b Black musicians such as Joseph ("Joe") King Oliver, W.C. Handy, and "Jelly Roll" Morton helped create jazz. Jazz was especially popular among the youth because it symbolized a desire to break with tradition.
  3. c 1907; William James; His concept of pragmatism held that truth was to be tested, above all, by the practical consequences of an idea, by action rather than theories. In short, beliefs should not be tested by experience. The ultimate test of truth is experience, not logic. It is important to remember that William James and other pragmatists do not believe in the existence of absolute truth.
  4. d 1849; Henry David Thoreau; He expressed opposition to the Mexican War. Thoreau argued that individuals have a moral responsibility to oppose unjust laws and unjust actions by governments. Thoreau's essay influenced Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolent civil disobedience.
  5. e 1831; William Lloyd Garrison; It called for the "immediate and uncompensated emancipation of the slaves." Famous quote: " Let Southern oppressors tremble. . . I will be as harsh as Truth and as uncompromising as Justice. . . I am in earnest - I will not retreat a single inch—and I WILL BE HEARD!"

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. 1939; John Steinbeck; Describes the plight of "Okies" forced to leave Dust Bowl-stricken Oklahoma in a futile attempt to find work in California.
  2. 1906; Upton Sinclair; The novel exposed appalling conditions in the Chicago meatpacking industry. It was a classic example of a muckraking novel. The novel helped bring about passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act of 1906.
  3. (1867-1899); Horatio Alger Jr.; This is a collection of approximately 270 dime novels. Alger's novels feature rags-to-riches stories describing how down-and-out boys become rich and successful through hard work, honesty, and a little luck.
  4. 1850; Nathaniel Hawthorne; The novel dealt with the legacy of Puritanism.
  5. 1757; James Fenimore Cooper; It was part of a series of novels known as the Leatherstocking Tales. Copper was the first American writer to feature uniquely American characters. Copper created the first genuine Western heroes in American literature. Cooper's novels gave expression to the concept of the "noble savage."

5 True/False Questions

  1. The Hudson River School1962; Michael Harrington; Poignant and influential report on poverty in America. The book played an important role in awakening JFK's interest in the poor and showed the way for LBJ's War on Poverty.

          

  2. Lost Generation of the 1920sKey writers included Sinclair Lewis and F. Scott Fitzgerald; Called this because they were disillusioned with American society during the 1920s. They criticized main-class conformity and materialism. For example, Sinclair Lewis criticized middle-class life in novels such as Babbitt and Main Street. Harlem Renaissance, 1920s. Key writers included Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Josephine Baker, and James Weldon Johnson. They created distinctive African American literature. Writers expressed pride in their African American culture.

          

  3. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz1956; W. H. Whyte; The novel criticizing the homogenous culture of the 1950s. It criticizes American conformity and the belief that economic growth would solve all problems.

          

  4. "Common sense"1957; Jack Kerouac; The novel expressed the alienation and disillusionment of the Beat Generation of the 1950s. Like other Beat Generation writers, Kerouac rejected middle-class conformity and materialism.

          

  5. Leaves of Grass1939; John Steinbeck; Describes the plight of "Okies" forced to leave Dust Bowl-stricken Oklahoma in a futile attempt to find work in California.

          

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