Introduction to Music Theory: Lesson 4

16 terms by zyris 

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minor scale

A diatonic scale with half steps (in its basic form) between 2-3 and 5-6

relative
keys

Major and minor keys with the same key signature, but different tonics
(e.g., Ab major and f minor)

parallel
keys

Major and minor keys with the same tonic, but different key signatures
(e.g., C# major and c# minor)

enharmonic
minor keys

a#/bb
d#/eb
g#/ab

3 forms
of minor

Natural, harmonic, and melodic

natural

Minor scale form that follows the key signature

harmonic

Minor scale form that raises the 7th scale degree one half step to provide a half-step leading tone to the tonic

melodic

Minor scale form that raises 6 and 7 ascending; returns (lowers) 6 and 7 to the natural form descending

tonic

Scale degree 1

supertonic

Scale degree 2

mediant

Scale degree 3

subdominant

Scale degree 4

dominant

Scale degree 5

submediant

Scale degree 6

subtonic

Scale degree 7 in the natural minor and descending melodic minor (one whole step below tonic

leading
tone

Scale degree 7 in the harmonic minor and ascending melodic minor (1/2 step below tonic)

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