Rhetorical Devices 1st Quarter

42 terms by bmonsour13 

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Diction

Word choice

"Neat People vs. Sloppy People"

Hyperbole

deliberate exaggeration of a person, thing, quality, event to emphasize a point external to the object of exaggeration; intentional exaggeration for rhetorical effect

EX: "The Pharisees, therefore, said among themselves, 'Perceive ye how ye prevail nothing; behold the world has gone after him." -John 12:19

Ethos

(Credibility), or ethical appeal, means convincing by the character of the author. We tend to believe people whom we respect. One of the central problems of argumentation is to project an impression to the reader that you are someone worth listening to, in other words making yourself as author into an authority on the subject of the paper, as well as someone who is likable and worthy of respect

EX: My Dear Fellow Clergymen:

While confined here in Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unwise and untimely."...Since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that your criticisms are sincerely set forth, I want to try to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable in terms.

I think I should indicate why I am here in Birmingham, since you have been influenced by the view which argues against "outsiders coming in."...I, along with several members of my staff, am here because I was invited here. I am here because I have organizational ties here.

But more basically, I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages and carried their "thus saith the Lord" far beyond the boundaries of their home towns, and just as the Apostle Paul left his village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco-Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid.

Martin Luther King, Jr. "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Pathos

(Emotional) means persuading by appealing to the reader's emotions. We can look at texts ranging from classic essays to contemporary advertisements to see how pathos, emotional appeals, are used to persuade. Language choice affects the audience's emotional response, and emotional appeal can effectively be used to enhance an argument.

EX: For me, commentary on war zones at home and abroad begins and ends with personal reflections. A few years ago, while watching the news in Chicago, a local news story made a personal connection with me. The report concerned a teenager who had been shot because he had angered a group of his male peers. This act of violence caused me to recapture a memory from my own adolescence because of an instructive parallel in my own life with this boy who had been shot. When I was a teenager some thirty-five years ago in the New York metropolitan area, I wrote a regular column for my high school newspaper. One week, I wrote a colunm in which I made fun of the fraternities in my high school. As a result, I elicited the anger of some of the most aggressive teenagers in my high school. A couple of nights later, a car pulled up in front of my house, and the angry teenagers in the car dumped garbage on the lawn of my house as an act of revenge and intimidation.

James Garbarino "Children in a Violent World: A Metaphysical Perspective"

Logos

(Logical) means persuading by the use of reasoning. This will be the most important technique we will study, and Aristotle's favorite. We'll look at deductive and inductive reasoning, and discuss what makes an effective, persuasive reason to back up your claims. Giving reasons is the heart of argumentation, and cannot be emphasized enough. We'll study the types of support you can use to substantiate your thesis, and look at some of the common logical fallacies, in order to avoid them in your writing.

EX:Let us begin with a simple proposition: What democracy requires is public debate, not information. Of course it needs information too, but the kind of information it needs can be generated only by vigorous popular debate. We do not know what we need to know until we ask the right questions, and we can identify the right questions only by subjecting our ideas about the world to the test of public controversy. Information, usually seen as the precondition of debate, is beter understood as its by product. When we get into arguments that focus and fully engage our attention, we become avid seekers of relevant information. Otherwise, we take in information passively--if we take it in at all.

Christopher Lasch, "The Lost Art of Political Argument"

Satire

a literary term used to ridicule or make fun of human vice or weakness, often with the intent of correcting, or changing, the subject of the satiric attack

EX: "Weekend Update" from Saturday Night Live

Verbal irony

A trope (or figure of speech) in which the intended meaning of a statement differs from the meaning that the words appear to express.

Mother comes into the TV room and discovers her 11-year-old watching South Park instead of doing his homework, as he was set to a dozen minutes ago. Pointing to the screen she says, "Don't let me tempt you from your duties, kiddo, but when you're finished with your serious studies there, maybe we could take some time out for recreation and do a little math."

syntax

the arrangement of words to form phrases, clauses and sentences; sentence construction. Syntax is also both patterns of the aforementioned arrangements and the function of a word, phrase, or clause within a sentence.

Clarify

To make clear or easier to understand

Reiterate

To state or do over again, or repeated sometimes with wearied effect

Qualify

To support with conditions

Elaborate

To give more details or new information about something

Idiomatic diction

The style of ones writing and speaking which involves the use of phrases where the words together have a meaning that is different from the dictionary.

Contradict

To imply the opposite or a denial of

Parallel structure

Similarity of structure in a pair or series of related words, phrases, or clauses. The basic principle of grammar and rhetoric demands that equivalent things be set forth in coordinate grammatical structures: nouns with nouns, infinitives with infinitives, and adverb clauses with adverb clauses

isocolon

Occurs when the parallel elements are similar not only in grammatical structure but also in length (#of words or even number of syllables)

Euphemism

an inoffensive expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive

Truism

an obvious truth

Synecdoche

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Litotes

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Apostrophe

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Antithesis

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Anastrophe

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Parenthesis

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Ellipsis

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Asyndeton

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Polysyndeton

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Alliteration

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Assonance

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Consonance

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Anaphora

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Epistrophe

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Anadiplosis

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Chiasmus

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Polyptoton

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Metaphor

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Simile

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Metonymy

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Onomatopoeia

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Oxymoron

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Paradox

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Rhetorical question

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