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5 Written Questions

5 Matching Questions

  1. Perpetual Union
  2. Monitor/Merrimac
  3. Clement L. Vallandigham
  4. John Clfford Pemberton
  5. William S. Rosecrans
  1. a Politician during the American Civil War (1861-65) whose Southern sympathies and determined vendetta against the Federal government and its war policy resulted in his court-martial and exile to the Confederacy. During the Civil War he bitterly attacked the administration of President Abraham Lincoln, charging that it was destroying not only the Constitution but civil liberty as well.
  2. b Confederate general during the Civil War, remembered for his unsuccessful defense of Vicksburg.
  3. c Union general and excellent strategist early in the American Civil War (1861-65); after his defeat in the Battle of Chickamauga (September 1863), he was relieved of his command. Later he represented California in the U.S. House of Representatives (1881-85) and served as register of the U.S. Treasury (1885-93).
  4. d This concept established the United States of America as a national entity. Under American constitutional law, this concept means that states are not permitted to withdraw from the Union.
  5. e The Battle of Monitor and Merrimack, was a naval battle of the American Civil War, famous for being the first fight between two ironclad warships, the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia (the latter rebuilt from the burned-out hull of the USS Merrimack). The principal confrontations took place on March 8 and March 9, 1862, off Sewell's Point, a narrow place near the mouth of Hampton Roads, Virginia. The naval battle lasted two days. The battle, though inconclusive, received worldwide publicity. After the battle, it was clear that ironclad ships were the future of naval warfare.
    -Lincoln administration

5 Multiple Choice Questions

  1. 11th president of the United States (1845-49). Under his leadership the United States fought the Mexican War (1846-48) and acquired vast territories along the Pacific coast and in the Southwest.
  2. American politician, leader of the Democratic Party, and orator who advocated the cause of popular sovereignty.. He was reelected senator from Illinois in 1858 after a series of eloquent debates with the Republican candidate, Abraham Lincoln, who defeated him in the presidential race two years later.
  3. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson was a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and one of the best-known. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting military prospects, the morale of its army and of the general public.
  4. Slave Power was a pejorative term used by opponents of slavery in the U.S. to identify the corrupting influence that slavery had on the United States of America. The Republican Party argued that the slave owners had seized control of most of the national government and were using it to their own ends. The American Civil War destroyed the "slave power" and the Republican policies during Reconstruction were specifically designed to totally erase its influence.
  5. The first Confiscation Act, passed on Aug. 6, 1861, authorized Union seizure of rebel property, and it stated that all slaves who fought with or worked for the Confederate military services were freed of further obligations to their masters.

5 True/False Questions

  1. Trent AffairAn Incident during the American Civil War involving the doctrine of freedom of the seas, which nearly precipitated war between Great Britain and the United States. On Nov. 8, 1861, Captain Charles Wilkes, commanding the Union frigate San Jacinto, seized from the neutral British ship Trent two Confederate commissioners, James Murray Mason and John Slidell, who were seeking the support of England and France for the cause of the Confederacy.
    -Lincoln administration.

          

  2. Confiscation ActsThe second Confiscation Act, passed July 17, 1862, was virtually an emancipation proclamation. It said that slaves of civilian and military Confederate officials "shall be forever free," but it was enforceable only in areas of the South occupied by the Union Army.

          

  3. 13th, 14th , 15th AmendmentsAmerican mapmaker and explorer of the Far West, an important figure in the U.S. conquest and development of California. He ran unsuccessfully as the first Republican presidential candidate in 1856.

          

  4. NY City draft riots1863: A four-day eruption of violence in New York City resulting from deep worker discontent with the inequities of conscription during the U.S. Civil War. Richer draftees were allowed to buy their way out of the draft so more poorer men were drafted than rich.

          

  5. Don Carlos BuellThe Confiscation Acts (1862-1864) were a series of laws passed by the federal government during the American Civil War that were designed to liberate slaves in the seceded states.
    On March 12, 1863, and July 2, 1864, the federal government passed additional measures ("Captured and Abandoned Property Acts") that defined property subject to seizure as that owned by absent individuals who supported the South.
    -Lincoln administration

          

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