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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Copperheads
  2. Perpetual Union
  3. James Longstreet
  4. NY City draft riots
  5. John Clfford Pemberton
  1. a A Confederate officer during the Civil War; He fought in the first and second battles of Bull Run, was a commander in the Peninsular Campaign ; and at Antietam and Fredericksburg commanded the I Corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. Promoted to lieutenant general, Longstreet participated in the Battle of Gettysburg as Lee's second in command. His delay in attacking and his slowness in organizing "Pickett's Charge," his critics argue, were responsible for the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg.
  2. b Confederate general during the Civil War, remembered for his unsuccessful defense of Vicksburg.
  3. c This concept established the United States of America as a national entity. Under American constitutional law, this concept means that states are not permitted to withdraw from the Union.
  4. d 1863: A four-day eruption of violence in New York City resulting from deep worker discontent with the inequities of conscription during the U.S. Civil War. Richer draftees were allowed to buy their way out of the draft so more poorer men were drafted than rich.
  5. e This was a term for Northern opponents of the American Civil War.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. 8th president of the United States (1837-41) and one of the founders of the Democratic Party. He was known as the "Little Magician" to his friends (and the "Sly Fox" to his enemies) in recognition of his reputed cunning and skill as a politician.
  2. The opinion delivered on March 6, 1857, in Dred Scott v. Sanford is well known. In essence, the decision argued that Scott was a slave and as such was not a citizen and could not sue in a federal court. The Dred Scott decision probably created more disagreement than any other legal opinion in U.S. history; it became a violently divisive issue in national politics and dangerously undermined the prestige of the Supreme Court.
  3. A Confederate general, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, the most successful of the Southern armies during the Civil War. In February 1865 he was given command of all the Southern armies. His surrender at Appomattox Courthouse April 9, 1865, signifies the end of the Civil War.
  4. Don Carlos Buell was a United States Army officer. Buell led Union armies in two great Civil War battles—Shiloh and Perryville. The nation was angry at his failure to defeat the outnumbered Confederates after Perryville, or to secure East Tennessee. Buell was relieved of field command in late 1862.
  5. Small civil war in the United States, fought between proslavery and antislavery advocates for control of the new territory of Kansas under the doctrine of popular sovereignty.

5 True/False questions

  1. George G. MeadeA general who skillfully reorganized Union forces, after McDowell was demoted, in the first year of the Civil War, but drew wide criticism for repeatedly failing to press his advantage over Confederate troops.

          

  2. Roger Brooke TaneyThe opinion delivered on March 6, 1857, in Dred Scott v. Sanford is well known. In essence, the decision argued that Scott was a slave and as such was not a citizen and could not sue in a federal court. The Dred Scott decision probably created more disagreement than any other legal opinion in U.S. history; it became a violently divisive issue in national politics and dangerously undermined the prestige of the Supreme Court.

          

  3. Hampton Roads Conference8th president of the United States (1837-41) and one of the founders of the Democratic Party. He was known as the "Little Magician" to his friends (and the "Sly Fox" to his enemies) in recognition of his reputed cunning and skill as a politician.

          

  4. Confiscation ActsThe first Confiscation Act, passed on Aug. 6, 1861, authorized Union seizure of rebel property, and it stated that all slaves who fought with or worked for the Confederate military services were freed of further obligations to their masters.

          

  5. Second confiscation actThe first Confiscation Act, passed on Aug. 6, 1861, authorized Union seizure of rebel property, and it stated that all slaves who fought with or worked for the Confederate military services were freed of further obligations to their masters.

          

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