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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Ambrose Burnside
  2. George G. Meade
  3. Clement L. Vallandigham
  4. Dred Scott case
  5. William Lowndes Yancey
  1. a An American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. As a Union Army general in the American Civil War, he conducted successful campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee but was defeated in the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater.
  2. b Politician during the American Civil War (1861-65) whose Southern sympathies and determined vendetta against the Federal government and its war policy resulted in his court-martial and exile to the Confederacy. During the Civil War he bitterly attacked the administration of President Abraham Lincoln, charging that it was destroying not only the Constitution but civil liberty as well.
  3. c American southern political leader and "fire-eater" who, in his later years, consistently urged the South to secede in response to Northern antislavery agitation.
  4. d An American army officer who played a critical role in the Civil War by defeating the Confederate Army at Gettysburg, Pa.
  5. e The opinion delivered on March 6, 1857, in Dred Scott v. Sanford is well known. In essence, the decision argued that Scott was a slave and as such was not a citizen and could not sue in a federal court. The Dred Scott decision probably created more disagreement than any other legal opinion in U.S. history; it became a violently divisive issue in national politics and dangerously undermined the prestige of the Supreme Court.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. American politician, leader of the Democratic Party, and orator who advocated the cause of popular sovereignty.. He was reelected senator from Illinois in 1858 after a series of eloquent debates with the Republican candidate, Abraham Lincoln, who defeated him in the presidential race two years later.
  2. This was a slogan used by Polk in his election campaign. It demonstrated the dispute over the Oregon Territory. Part of what they wanted was owned by the British, as they had joint occupation of it. Eventually, they outnumbered the British and won the territory.
  3. This was a term for Northern opponents of the American Civil War.
  4. Salmon Chase was an American politician and jurist. Chase was one of the most prominent members of the new Republican Party. Chase articulated the "Slave Power conspiracy" thesis well before Lincoln. He coined the slogan of the Free Soil Party, "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men." He devoted his energies to the destruction of what he considered the Slave Power.
  5. The 16th president of the United States (1861-65), who preserved the Union during the Civil War and brought about the emancipation of the slaves.

5 True/False questions

  1. NY City draft riots1863: A four-day eruption of violence in New York City resulting from deep worker discontent with the inequities of conscription during the U.S. Civil War. Richer draftees were allowed to buy their way out of the draft so more poorer men were drafted than rich.

          

  2. Harriet Beecher StoweAmerican writer and philanthropist, the author of the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, which contributed so much to popular feeling against slavery that it is cited among the causes of the American Civil War.

          

  3. Second confiscation actThe second Confiscation Act, passed July 17, 1862, was virtually an emancipation proclamation. It said that slaves of civilian and military Confederate officials "shall be forever free," but it was enforceable only in areas of the South occupied by the Union Army.

          

  4. Slave PowerSlave Power was a pejorative term used by opponents of slavery in the U.S. to identify the corrupting influence that slavery had on the United States of America. The Republican Party argued that the slave owners had seized control of most of the national government and were using it to their own ends. The American Civil War destroyed the "slave power" and the Republican policies during Reconstruction were specifically designed to totally erase its influence.

          

  5. "Government girls"This was a slogan used by Polk in his election campaign. It demonstrated the dispute over the Oregon Territory. Part of what they wanted was owned by the British, as they had joint occupation of it. Eventually, they outnumbered the British and won the territory.

          

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