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anthropologist

one who studies how mankind developed in mind and body from primitive cultures and early forms

anthropology

the study of the origins and development of mankind

astronomy

the science of the arrangement of stars and other celestial bodies
note: ___ deals in such enormous distance (the sun, for example, is 93,000,000 miles from the earth, and light travels towards the earth at 186,000 miles per second) that the adjective astronomical is applied to any tremendously large figure, as in "the astronomical size of the national debt")

astronomer

one who studies astronomy

astrology

the study of the influence of planets and starts on human events
practitioner: astrologer

aster

a star-shaped flower

asterisk

a star-shaped symbol (*), generally used in writing or printing to direct the reader to look for a footnote

astrophysics

that branch of physics dealing with heavenly bodies

disaster

a misfortune or calamity (in ancient times it was believed that the stars ruled human destiny; a disaster, therefore, happened to someone because the stars were in opposition

autonomy

independence, self-law, self-government
note: the fifty states in our nation are fairly autonomous, but not completely so. On the other hand, in most colleges each separate department is pretty much autonomous. And of course, one of the big reasons for the revolution of 1776 was that America wanted ___, rather than control by England

metronome

the instrument that musicians use to guide their timing. A pendulum swings back and forth, making an audible click at each sing, and in that way governs or orders the measure (or timing) of the player

astronaut

a sailor among the stars
adj. - nautical - relating to sailors, sailing, ships, or navigation
note: nautes in turn is from Greek naus, ship

nausea

ship-sickness or seasickness

cosmonaut

Russian term equivalent (with less exaggeration) to astronaut)

geology

the sciences of the earth, its formation, constituents, and history

geologist

one who studies geology

geometry

that branch of mathematics treating of the measurement and properties of solid and plane figures, such as angles, triangles, squares, spheres, prisms, etc.
the mathematician: geometrician
Note: The etymology of the word - ge plus metron, "measurement of the earth" - shows that this ancient science was originally concerned with the measurement of land and spaces on the earth

geography

writing about, or mapping the earth
a practitioner of the science: geographer

George

the name is also derived from ge (geo-) - the first George was an earth-worker or farmer

biology

the science of all living organisms

biologist

one who studies biology

biography

writing about someone's life

biographer

one who writes a biography of someone else

autobiography

the story of one's life written by oneself

autobiographer

one who writes an autobiography of himself or herself

biopsy

a medical examination, or view, generally through a microscope, of living tissue, frequently performed when cancer is suspected. A small part of the tissue is cut from the affected area and under the microscope its cells can be investigated for evidence of malignancy

autopsy

a medical examination of a corpse in order to discover the cause of death. In an autopsy, etymologically speaking, the surgeon or pathologist determines, by actual view or sight rather than by theorizing (i.e., "by viewing or seeing for oneself"), what brought the corpse to its present grievous state

botany

the science of all flora, or all plant life

botanist

one who studies botany

zoology

the science of all fauna, or all animal life

zoologist

one who studies zoology

zodiac

a diagram, used in astrology, of the paths of the sun, moon, and planets; it contains, in part, Latin names for various animals --scorpio, scorpion; leo, lion; cancer, crab; taurus, bull; aries, ram; and pisces, fish. Hence its derivation from zoion, animal

entomology

the branch of zoology dealing with insects

entomologist

one who studies entomology

tome

etymologically, a part cut from the whole
Note: originally any book that was part of a larger work of many volumes was called a tome. Today a dome designates, often disparagingly, an exceptionally large book, or one that is heavy and dull in content

tonsillectomy

the surgical procedure to "cut out" or remove the tonsils

appendectomy

the surgical procedure to "cut out" or remove the appendix

mastectomy

the surgical procedure to "cut out" or remove the breast

hysterectomy

the surgical procedure to "cut out" or remove the uterus

prostatectomy

the surgical procedure to "cut out" or remove the prostate gland

eccentric

out of the center, hence deviating from the normal in behavior, attitudes, etc., or unconventional, odd, strange

atom

particle so named at a time when it was considered the smallest possible constituent of an element, that is, one that could not be cut any further

anatomy

originally the cutting up of a plant or animal to determine its structure, later the bodily structure itself

dichotomy

a splitting in two, a technical word used in astronomy, biology, botany, and the science of logic. It is also employed as a non-technical term, as when we refer to the dichotomy in the life of a man who is a government clerk all day and a night-school teacher after working hours, so that his life is, in a sense, split into two parts.

epitome

a condensation of the whole

philology

etymologically the love of words more commonly called linguistics, the science of language

philanthropy

by etymology the love of mankind

philanthropist

one who devotes himself to philanthropy

philander

to "play around" sexually, be promiscuous, or have extramarital relations

philanderer

one who engages in the interesting activities cataloged with philander

philter

a love potion. Philter is a rarely used word. Today we call whatever arouses sexual desire an aphrodisiac, from Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty. Aphrodisiac is an adj. as well as a n., but a longer adjective from, aphrodisiac, is also used

bibliophile

one who loves books as collectibles, admiring their binding, typography, illustrations, rarity, etc. - in short, a book collector

Anglophile

one who admires and is fond of the British people, customs, culture, etc.

philosophy

by etymology the love of wisdom

Philadelphia

the City of Brotherly Love

philharmonic

loving music or harmony

semantics

the study of the relationship between language and thinking, between meaning and worse, and the psychological causes and effect of what people say and write

sociology

the study of the ways in which people live together, their family and community structures, their customs, their social relationships, and their governments

sociologist

one who studies sociology

asocial

withdrawn and self-centered, avoiding contact with others, indifferent to the interests or welfare of society

antisocial

actively disliking people, often behaving in ways that are detrimental or destructive to society

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