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prevail

To be greater in strength or influence; triumph: prevailed against the enemy.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

sinus

Anatomy Any of various air-filled cavities in the bones of the skull, especially one communicating with the nostrils.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

weasel

Any of various carnivorous mammals of the genus Mustela, having a long slender body, a long tail, short legs, and brownish fur that in many species turns white in winter.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

oasis

A fertile or green spot in a desert or wasteland, made so by the presence of water.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

quarrel

An angry dispute; an altercation.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

lightning

An abrupt, discontinuous natural electric discharge in the atmosphere.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

foreground

The part of a scene or picture that is nearest to and in front of the viewer.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

veil

A length of cloth worn by women over the head, shoulders, and often the face.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

midriff

...
The middle outer portion of the front of the human body, extending roughly from just below the breast to the waistline.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

munchkin

A very small person.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

kindergarten

A program or class for four-year-old to six-year-old children that serves as an introduction to school.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

marshmallow

a plant of the genus Althæa ( Althæa officinalis) common in marshes near the seashore, and whose root is much used in medicine as a demulcent.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

question

An expression of inquiry that invites or calls for a reply.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

bristle

A stiff hairlike structure: the bristles of a wire brush.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

delighted

...
Filled with delight.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

echoed

Repetition of a sound by reflection of sound waves from a surface.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

therapy

Treatment of illness or disability.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

mortar

A vessel in which substances are crushed or ground with a pestle.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

intruder

Someone who intrudes.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

terrific

Very good or fine; splendid: a terrific tennis player.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

curtain

Material that hangs in a window or other opening as a decoration, shade, or screen.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

calculator

One that calculates, as:

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

An electronic or mechanical device for the performance of mathematical computations.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

blizzard

A violent snowstorm with winds blowing at a minimum speed of 35 miles (56 kilometers) per hour and visibility of less than one-quarter mile (400 meters) for three hours.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

virtue

Moral excellence and righteousness; goodness.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

antelope

Any of various swift-running ruminant mammals of the family Bovidae, native to Africa and Asia and having long horns and a slender build.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

blatant

Unpleasantly loud and noisy: 'There are those who find the trombones blatant and the triangle silly, but both add effective color" ( Musical Heritage Review). See Synonyms at vociferous.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Usage Problem Totally or offensively conspicuous or obtrusive: a blatant lie.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

confection

The act or process of confecting or the result of it: 'These sentiments are not the confection of a consummate courtroom actor" ( Ron Rosenbaum).

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

realty

Real estate.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

ingredient

An element in a mixture or compound. See Synonyms at element.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

fanzine

An amateur-produced magazine written for a subculture of enthusiasts devoted to a particular interest: a science fiction fanzine.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

widget

A small mechanical device or control; a gadget.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

recruit

To engage (persons) for military service.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

airborne

Carried by or through the air: airborne pollen.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

peruse

To read or examine, typically with great care.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

genius

Extraordinary intellectual and creative power.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

eclipse

The partial or complete obscuring, relative to a designated observer, of one celestial body by another.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

unreadable

Not legible or decipherable; illegible: unreadable handwriting.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

defiantly

In a defiant manner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

acrobat

One who is skilled in feats of balance and agility in gymnastics.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

clarinet

A woodwind instrument having a straight cylindrical tube with a flaring bell and a single-reed mouthpiece, played by means of finger holes and keys.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

plague

A widespread affliction or calamity, especially one seen as divine retribution.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

tourism

The practice of traveling for pleasure.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

waiver

Intentional relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

imitate

To copy the actions, appearance, mannerisms, or speech of; mimic: amused friends by imitating the teachers.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

larceny

The unlawful taking and removing of another's personal property with the intent of permanently depriving the owner; theft.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

altogether

Entirely; completely; utterly: lost the TV picture altogether; an altogether new approach.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

toilsome

Characterized by or requiring toil.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

perturb

To disturb greatly; make uneasy or anxious.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

delved

To search deeply and laboriously: delved into the court records.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

cleave

To split with or as if with a sharp instrument. See Synonyms at tear1.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

mischief

Behavior that causes discomfiture or annoyance in another.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

interpret

To explain the meaning of: interpreted the ambassador's remarks. See Synonyms at explain.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

exotic

From another part of the world; foreign: exotic tropical plants in a greenhouse. See Synonyms at foreign.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

laborious

Marked by or requiring long, hard work: spent many laborious hours on the project.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

defunct

Having ceased to exist or live: a defunct political organization.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

audience

The spectators or listeners assembled at a performance, for example, or attracted by a radio or television program.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

thermostat

A device, as in a home heating system, a refrigerator, or an air conditioner, that automatically responds to temperature changes and activates switches controlling the equipment.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

pyramid

A solid figure with a polygonal base and triangular faces that meet at a common point.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

carnival

A traveling amusement show usually including rides, games, and sideshows.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

evidence

A thing or things helpful in forming a conclusion or judgment: The broken window was evidence that a burglary had taken place. Scientists weigh the evidence for and against a hypothesis.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

microphone

An instrument that converts sound waves into an electric current, usually fed into an amplifier, a recorder, or a broadcast transmitter.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

sequel

Something that follows; a continuation.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

carpenter

A skilled worker who makes, finishes, and repairs wooden objects and structures.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

replete

Abundantly supplied; abounding: a stream replete with trout; an apartment replete with Empire furniture.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

pungent

Affecting the organs of taste or smell with a sharp acrid sensation.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

jealousy

A jealous attitude or disposition.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

trespass

To commit an offense or a sin; transgress or err.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Law To commit an unlawful injury to the person, property, or rights of another, with actual or implied force or violence, especially to enter onto another's land wrongfully.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

hurriedly

In a hurried manner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

muscular

Of, relating to, or consisting of muscle: muscular contraction.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Having well-developed muscles: a muscular build.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

envoy

A messenger; an agent.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

vegetarian

Consisting primarily or wholly of vegetables and vegetable products: a vegetarian diet.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

damageable

Capable of being injured or weakened, susceptible to damage.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

brochure

A small booklet or pamphlet, often containing promotional material or product information.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

punctual

Acting or arriving exactly at the time appointed; prompt.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

condiment

A substance, such as a relish, vinegar, or spice, used to flavor or complement food.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

hostile

Of, relating to, or characteristic of an enemy: hostile forces; hostile acts.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

fascinating

Possessing the power to charm or allure; captivating.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

impel

To urge to action through moral pressure; drive: I was impelled by events to take a stand.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

serenade

Music A complimentary performance given to honor or express love for someone.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

hydrogen

A colorless, highly flammable gaseous element, the lightest of all gases and the most abundant element in the universe, used in the production of synthetic ammonia and methanol, in petroleum refining, in the hydrogenation of organic materials, as a reducing atmosphere, in oxyhydrogen torches, and in rocket fuels. Atomic number 1; atomic weight 1.00794; melting point -259.14°C; boiling point -252.8°C; density at 0°C 0.08987 gram per liter; valence 1. See Table at element.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

ecstatic

Being in a state of ecstasy; joyful or enraptured.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

leisure

Freedom from time-consuming duties, responsibilities, or activities.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

municipal

Of or relating to the internal affairs of a nation.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

nocturnal

Of, relating to, or occurring in the night: nocturnal stillness.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

schooner

A fore-and-aft rigged sailing vessel having at least two masts, with a foremast that is usually smaller than the other masts.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

A large beer glass, generally holding a pint or more.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

elegant

Characterized by or exhibiting refined, tasteful beauty of manner, form, or style. See Synonyms at delicate.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

stratosphere

The region of the atmosphere above the troposphere and below the mesosphere.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

telepathic

Of, relating to, or using telepathy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

calzone

A baked or fried Italian turnover of pizza dough filled with vegetables, meat, or cheese.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

jubilant

Exultingly joyful.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

syllable

A unit of spoken language consisting of a single uninterrupted sound formed by a vowel, diphthong, or syllabic consonant alone, or by any of these sounds preceded, followed, or surrounded by one or more consonants.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

fajitas

A dish consisting of strips of marinated meat, poultry, or vegetables that are grilled over an open fire and served in a tortilla, usually with spicy condiments. Often used in the plural.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

allergenic

A substance, such as pollen, that causes an allergy.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

barracks

To house (soldiers, for example) in quarters.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

technician

One whose occupation requires training in a specific technical process: an electronics technician; an automotive technician.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

remorseful

Marked by or filled with remorse.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

emphasize

To give emphasis to; stress.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

conjure

To summon (a devil or spirit) by magical or supernatural power.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

animation

The act, process, or result of imparting life, interest, spirit, motion, or activity.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

frivolous

Unworthy of serious attention; trivial: a frivolous novel.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

intercept

To stop, deflect, or interrupt the progress or intended course of: intercepted me with a message as I was leaving.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

disappoint

To fail to satisfy the hope, desire, or expectation of.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

pursuit

The act or an instance of chasing or pursuing.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

lullaby

A soothing song with which to lull a child to sleep.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

livelihood

Means of support; subsistence.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

embryo

An organism in its early stages of development, especially before it has reached a distinctively recognizable form.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

juvenile

Not fully grown or developed; young.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

accrued

...
To come to one as a gain, addition, or increment: interest accruing in my savings account.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

duress

Constraint by threat; coercion: confessed under duress.

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

matrimony

...

parasite

...

desperately

...

chickabiddy

...

onslaught

...

competently

...

allocation

...

pristine

...

gourmet

...

adequate

...

potassium

...

ulterior

...

harmonious

...

compromise

...

insulation

...

inflammable

...

chromosome

...

gloaming

...

controversy

...

intrigue

...

malevolent

...

correspondence

...

disappearance

...

loathe

...

reimbursable

...

manifestation

...

dilemma

...

hospice

...

thoroughbred

...

syringe

...

residue

...

fedora

...

irritability

...

carnage

...

leniency

...

impenetrable

...

fluoride

...

adolescence

...

See More

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