Psychopharmacology - Quiz #1

Created by Vesian 

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17 terms

Where is Acetylcholine created in the brain?

Created: in the Pons, Basal Forebrain, and Medial Septium.

What does Acetylcholine do?

Purpose: Creates excitatory effects in post-synaptic dendrites, targets organs of the parasympathetic nervous system (ie, adrenal gland)

Where is Dopamine created in the brain?

Created in the prefrontal cortex

What does Dopamine do?

Produces either excitatory or inhibitory post-synaptic potentials depending on the type of dopamine receptor.

Influences movement, attention, learning, coordination, and reward feelings (ie, reward pathway)

Where is Norepinephrine created in the brain?

Created in the Locus Coeruleus, Pons, Medulla, and Thalamus.

What does Norepinephrine do?

Produces excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials depending on the type of norepinephrine receptor

Serves as a hormone in the sympathetic nervous system that affects Vigilance, Sexual behavior, and appetite.

Where is Serotonin created in the brain?

Created in the Prefrontal Cortex, Pons, Hippocampus, and Hypothalamus.

What does Serotonin do?

Produces excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials depending on the type of serotonin receptor.

Activates GABA neurons and promotes anxiety control. Regulates mood, emotion, aggression, eating, sleep, arousal, and pain.

Where are Endorphins created in the brain?

Created in the thalamus, basal ganglia, dorsal horn of the spinal chord, and cerebral cortex.

What does an Endorphin do?

Products inhibitory effects

Promotes pain management, makes you feel good (ie, runners high), sedation, reduced blood pressure, decreased respiration.

ADME: What does the A stand for, and what is it?

Absorption: How the drug goes into the body. Usually via the blood steam in the digestive tract.

ADME: What does the D stand for, and what is it?

Distribution: How the compound is carried to the target site (often via the bloodsteam)

ADME: What does the M stand for, and what is it?

Metabolism: When the compound is broken down after it enters the body. Done via liver enzymes.

ADME: What does the E stand for, and what is it?

Excretion: Compounds need to be removed from the body via excredition, usually via the kidneys or large intestine.

Methods that drugs can get into the body

Intravenous Injection
Intramuscular Injection
Oral administration
Topical administration
Inhalation

What is an Agonist?

A drug that stimulates or activates actions of the neurotransmitters

What is an Antagonist?

A drug that prevents the actions of neurotransmitters

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