Wordmasters 3rd Grade Meet #2 SL

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gully

A deep ditch or channel cut in the earth by running water after a prolonged downpour.
v. gul·lied, gul·ly·ing, gul·lies
v.tr.
To wear a deep ditch or channel in.
v.intr.
To form a deep ditch or channel.

bellow

v. bel·lowed, bel·low·ing, bel·lows
v.intr.
1. To make the deep roaring sound characteristic of a bull.
2. To shout in a deep voice.
v.tr.
To utter in a loud, powerful voice. See Synonyms at shout.
n.
1. The roar of a large animal, such as a bull.
2. A very loud utterance or other sound.



[Middle English belwen, perhaps from Old English belgan, to be enraged, and bylgan, to bellow.]

feeble

adj. fee·bler, fee·blest
1.
a. Lacking strength; weak.
b. Indicating weakness.
2. Lacking vigor, force, or effectiveness; inadequate. See Synonyms at weak.



[Middle English feble, from Old French, from Latin flbilis, lamentable, from flre, to weep.]

whirlpool

n
1. (Earth Sciences / Physical Geography) a powerful circular current or vortex of water, usually produced by conflicting tidal currents or by eddying at the foot of a waterfall
2. something resembling a whirlpool in motion or the power to attract into its vortex
3. (Fine Arts & Visual Arts / Furniture) short for whirlpool bath

sidle

v. si·dled, si·dling, si·dles
v.intr.
1. To move sideways: sidled through the narrow doorway.
2. To advance in an unobtrusive, furtive, or coy way: swindlers who sidle up to tourists.
v.tr.
To cause to move sideways: We sidled the canoe to the riverbank.
n.
1. An unobtrusive, furtive, or coy advance.
2. A sideways movement.

rickety

adj. rick·et·i·er, rick·et·i·est
1. Likely to break or fall apart; shaky.
2. Feeble with age; infirm.
3. Of, having, or resembling rickets.

turf

n. pl. turfs also turves (tûrvz)
1.
a. A surface layer of earth containing a dense growth of grass and its matted roots; sod.
b. An artificial substitute for such a grassy layer, as on a playing field.
2. A piece cut from a layer of earth or sod.
3. A piece of peat that is burned for use as fuel.
4. Slang
a. The range of the authority or influence of a person, group, or thing; a bailiwick: "a bureaucracy ... concerned with turf, promotions, the budget, and protecting the retirement system" (Harper's).
b. A geographical area; a territory.
c. The area claimed by a gang, as of youths, as its personal territory.
5. Sports
a. A racetrack.
b. The sport or business of racing horses.
tr.v. turfed, turf·ing, turfs
1. To spread with turf: turfed the front yard.
2. Chiefly British Slang To displace or eject.
3. Slang To kill: "These guys can't . . . make sure nobody gets turfed" (Scott Turf)

swirl

v. swirled, swirl·ing, swirls
v.intr.
1. To move with a twisting or whirling motion; eddy.
2. To be dizzy or disoriented.
3. To be arranged in a spiral, whorl, or twist.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move with a twisting or whirling motion. See Synonyms at turn.
2. To form into or arrange in a spiral, whorl, or twist.
n.
1. A whirling or eddying motion or mass: a swirl of white water.
2. Something, such as a curl of hair, that coils, twists, or whirls.
3. Whirling confusion or disorder: "high-pressure farce built around the swirl of mistaken identities" (Jay Carr).

cocky

cocky1
adj cockier, cockiest
excessively proud of oneself
cockily adv

cocky2
n pl cockies Austral informal
1. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Animals) short for cockatoo [2]
2. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Agriculture) a farmer whose farm is regarded as small or of little account
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

murmur

n.
1. A low, indistinct, continuous sound: spoke in a murmur; the murmur of the waves.
2. An indistinct, whispered, or confidential complaint; a mutter.
3. Medicine An abnormal sound, usually emanating from the heart, that sometimes indicates a diseased condition.
v. mur·mured, mur·mur·ing, mur·murs
v.intr.
1. To make a low, continuous, indistinct sound or succession of sounds.
2. To complain in low mumbling tones; grumble.
v.tr.
To say in a low indistinct voice; utter indistinctly: murmured his approval

[Middle English murmure, from Old French, from Latin murmur, a humming, roaring, of imitative origin.]

hustle

v. hus·tled, hus·tling, hus·tles
v.intr.
1. To move or act energetically and rapidly: We hustled to get dinner ready on time.
2. To push or force one's way.
3. To act aggressively, especially in business dealings.
4. Slang
a. To obtain something by deceitful or illicit means; practice theft or swindling.
b. To solicit customers. Used of a pimp or prostitute.
c. To misrepresent one's ability in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling.
v.tr.
1. To push or convey in a hurried or rough manner: hustled the prisoner into a van.
2. To cause or urge to proceed quickly; hurry: hustled the board into a quick decision.
3. Slang
a. To sell or get by questionable or aggressive means: hustled stolen watches; hustling spare change.
b. To pressure into buying or doing something: a barfly hustling the other customers for drinks.
c. To misrepresent one's skill in (a game or activity) in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling: hustle pool.
n.
1. The act or an instance of jostling or shoving.
2. Energetic activity; drive.
3. Slang An illicit or unethical way of doing business or obtaining money; a fraud or deceit: "the most dangerous and wide-open drug hustle of them all" (Newsweek

sorrowful

adj.
Affected with, marked by, causing, or expressing sorrow. See Synonyms at sad.



sorrow·ful·ly adv.
sorrow·ful·ness n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fleece

n.
1.
a. The coat of wool of a sheep or similar animal.
b. The yield of wool shorn from a sheep at one time.
2. A soft woolly covering or mass.
3. Fabric with a soft deep pile.
tr.v. fleeced, fleec·ing, fleec·es
1. To defraud of money or property; swindle.
2. To shear the fleece from.
3. To cover with or as if with fleece.



[Middle English fles, from Old English flos.]

strut

v. strut·ted, strut·ting, struts
v.intr.
To walk with pompous bearing; swagger.
v.tr.
1. To display in order to impress others. Sometimes used with out: Don't strut out your resume until you have more accomplishments to list.
2.
a. To provide (a structure) with a strut or struts.
b. To brace or separate with or as if with a strut.
n.
1. A pompous, self-important gait.
2. A structural element used to brace or strengthen a framework by resisting longitudinal compression.
Idiom:
strut (one's) stuff Slang
To behave or perform in an ostentatious manner; show off.



[Middle English strouten, to stand out, from Old English strtian, to stand out stiffly; see ster-1 in Indo-European roots.]


strutter n.
strutting·ly adv.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved

inland

adj.
1. Of, relating to, or located in the interior part of a country or region: inland freshwater lakes and ponds.
2. Chiefly British Operating or applying within the borders of a country or region; domestic: inland tariffs.
adv.
In, toward, or into the interior of a country or region.
n. (-lnd, -lnd)
The interior of a country or region.



inlander n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved

canyon

can·yon also ca·ñon (knyn)
n.
A narrow chasm with steep cliff walls, cut into the earth by running water; a gorge.



[Spanish cañon, augmentative of caña, tube, cane, from Latin canna, reed; see cane.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



canyon, cañon [ˈkænjən]
n
(Earth Sciences / Physical Geography) a gorge or ravine, esp in North America, usually formed by the down-cutting of a river in a dry area where there is insufficient rainfall to erode the sides of the valley
[from Spanish cañon, from caña tube, from Latin canna cane]
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003



canyon (knyn)
A long, deep, narrow valley with steep cliff walls, cut into the Earth by running water and often having a stream at the bottom.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


canyon - Gets its name from Spanish canon, "tube."
See also related terms for tube.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2011 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

babble

v. bab·bled, bab·bling, bab·bles
v.intr.
1. To utter a meaningless confusion of words or sounds: Babies babble before they can talk.
2. To talk foolishly or idly; chatter: "In 1977 [he] was thought of as crazy because he was babbling about supply side" (Newt Gingrich).
3. To make a continuous low, murmuring sound, as flowing water.
v.tr.
1. To utter rapidly and indistinctly.
2. To blurt out impulsively; disclose without careful consideration.
n.
1. Inarticulate or meaningless talk or sounds.
2. Idle or foolish talk; chatter.
3. A continuous low, murmuring sound, as of flowing water.



[Middle English babelen.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



babble [ˈbæbəl]
vb
1. to utter (words, sounds, etc.) in an incoherent or indistinct jumble
2. (intr) to talk foolishly, incessantly, or irrelevantly
3. (tr) to disclose (secrets, confidences, etc.) carelessly or impulsively
4. (intr) (of streams, birds, etc.) to make a low murmuring or bubbling sound
n
1. incoherent or foolish speech; chatter
2. a murmuring or bubbling sound
[compare Dutch babbelen, Swedish babbla, French babiller to prattle, Latin babulus fool; probably all of imitative origin]
babblement n
babbling n & adj
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003



Babble barbers collectively—Lipton, 1970
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

murky

adj. murk·i·er also mirk·i·er, murk·i·est also mirk·i·est
1. Dark, dim, or gloomy: a murky dungeon. See Synonyms at dark.
2.
a. Heavy and thick with smoke, mist, or fog; hazy.
b. Darkened or clouded with sediment: murky waters.
3. Lacking clarity or distinctness; cloudy or obscure.



murki·ly adv.
murki·ness n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


murky, mirky [ˈmɜːkɪ]
adj murkier, murkiest, mirkier mirkiest
1. gloomy or dark
2. cloudy or impenetrable as with smoke or fog
murkily , mirkily adv
murkiness , mirkiness n
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

sty

n. pl. sties (stz)
1. An enclosure for swine.
2. A filthy place.
tr. & intr.v. stied (std), sty·ing, sties (stz)
To shut up in or live in a sty.



[Middle English, from Old English stig.]


sty 2 also stye (st)
n. pl. sties also styes (stz)
Inflammation of one or more sebaceous glands of an eyelid.



[Alteration of Middle English styanye : styan, sty (from Old English stgend, from present participle of stgan, to rise; see steigh- in Indo-European roots) + eye, ye, eye; see eye.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

squabble

tr.v. squab·bled, squab·bling, squab·bles
To engage in a disagreeable argument, usually over a trivial matter; wrangle. See Synonyms at argue.
n.
A noisy quarrel, usually about a trivial matter.



[Probably of Scandinavian origin.]



squabbler n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



squabble [ˈskwɒbəl]
vb
(intr) to quarrel over a small matter
n
a petty quarrel
[probably of Scandinavian origin; related to Swedish dialect sqvabbel to quarrel]
squabbler n
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

coastal

n.
1.
a. Land next to the sea; the seashore.
b. Coast The Pacific coast of the United States.
2. A hill or other slope down which one may coast, as on a sled.
3. The act of sliding or coasting; slide.
4. Obsolete The frontier or border of a country.
v. coast·ed, coast·ing, coasts
v.intr.
1.
a. To slide down an incline through the effect of gravity.
b. To move effortlessly and smoothly. See Synonyms at slide.
2. To move without further use of propelling power.
3. To act or move aimlessly or with little effort: coasted for a few weeks before applying for a job.
4. Nautical To sail near or along a coast.
v.tr. Nautical
To sail or move along the coast or border of.



[Middle English coste, from Old French, from Latin costa, side; see kost- in Indo-European roots.]



coastal (kstl) adj.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved

rut

n.
1. A sunken track or groove made by the passage of vehicles.
2. A fixed, usually boring routine.
tr.v. rut·ted, rut·ting, ruts
To furrow.



[Possibly alteration of route.]


rut 2 (rt)
n.
1. An annually recurring condition or period of sexual excitement and reproductive activity in male deer.
2. A condition or period of mammalian sexual activity, such as estrus.
intr.v. rut·ted, rut·ting, ruts
To be in rut.



[Middle English rutte, from Old French rut, from Vulgar Latin rgitus, from rgere, to roar, from Latin rgre, to roar.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



rut1
n
1. a groove or furrow in a soft road, caused by wheels
2. any deep mark, hole, or groove
3. a narrow or predictable way of life, set of attitudes, etc.; dreary or undeviating routine (esp in the phrase in a rut)
vb ruts, rutting, rutted
(tr) to make a rut or ruts in
[probably from French route road]


rut2
n
1. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Zoology) a recurrent period of sexual excitement and reproductive activity in certain male ruminants, such as the deer, that corresponds to the period of oestrus in females
2. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Zoology) another name for oestrus
vb ruts, rutting, rutted
(Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Zoology) (intr) (of male ruminants) to be in a period of sexual excitement and activity
[from Old French rut noise, roar, from Latin rugītus, from rugīre to roar]
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

moan

n.
1.
a. A low, sustained, mournful cry, usually indicative of sorrow or pain.
b. A similar sound: the eerie moan of the night wind.
2. Lamentation.
v. moaned, moan·ing, moans
v.intr.
1.
a. To utter a moan or moans.
b. To make a sound resembling a moan: A saxophone moaned in the background.
2. To complain, lament, or grieve: an old man who still moans about his misspent youth.
v.tr.
1. To bewail or bemoan: She moaned her misfortunes to anyone who would listen.
2. To utter with moans or a moan.



[Middle English mone, from Old English *mn; see mei-no- in Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



moan [məʊn]
n
1. a low prolonged mournful sound expressive of suffering or pleading
2. any similar mournful sound, esp that made by the wind
3. a grumble or complaint
vb
1. to utter (words) in a low mournful manner
2. (intr) to make a sound like a moan
3. (usually intr) to grumble or complain (esp in the phrase moan and groan)
[related to Old English mǣnan to grieve over]
moaner n
moanful adj
moaning n & adj
moaningly adv
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

piercing

The 14th President of the United States (1853-1857). He was unable to reconcile the issue of slavery that divided the United States.


pierce (pîrs)
v. pierced, pierc·ing, pierc·es
v.tr.
1. To cut or pass through with or as if with a sharp instrument; stab or penetrate.
2. To make a hole or opening in; perforate.
3. To make a way through: The path pierced the wilderness.
4. To sound sharply through: His shout pierced the din.
5. To succeed in penetrating (something) with the eyes or the intellect: Large glowing yellow eyes pierced the darkness.
v.intr.
To penetrate into or through something: The rocket pierced through space.


[Middle English percen, from Old French percer, probably from Vulgar Latin *pertsire, from Latin pertsus, past participle of pertundere, to bore through : per-, per- + tundere, to beat.]


piercer n.
piercing adj.
piercing·ly adv.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



piercing [ˈpɪəsɪŋ]
adj
1. (of a sound) sharp and shrill
2. (of eyes or a look) intense and penetrating
3. (of an emotion) strong and deeply affecting
4. (of cold or wind) intense or biting
n
1. the art or practice of piercing body parts for the insertion of jewellery
2. an instance of the piercing of a body part
piercingly adv
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

dune

n.
A hill or ridge of wind-blown sand.



[French, from Old French, from Middle Dutch dne; see dheu- in Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



dune [djuːn]
n
(Earth Sciences / Physical Geography) a mound or ridge of drifted sand, occurring on the sea coast and in deserts
[via Old French from Middle Dutch dūne; see down3]
Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003



dune (dn)
A hill or ridge of wind-blown sand. Dunes are capable of moving by the motion of their individual grains but usually keep the same shape. See more at barchan dunedraalongitudinal duneseif dunetransverse dune
dune
top: barchan dune;
bottom: transverse dune

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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