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88 terms

Criminology Exam #1

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crime is an offense to God
Thomas Aquinas
crime is a moral failure - punishment reflects absoluteness of God's law - torture
Thomas Aquinas
social contract
Thomas Hobbes
mercantilism
Thomas Hobbes
humans by nature are good
Thomas Aquinas
humans by nature are bad
Thomas Hobbes
a war of all against all
thomas hobbes
how does hobbes think society holds itself together
social contract
classical theory
cesare beccaria and bentham
On crimes and punishment
cesare beccaria
determinate sentencing
beccaria
deterrence: specific and general
beccaria
severity, certainty, celerity
beccaria
brutilization thesis
beccaria
"Judges, in criminal cases, have no right to interpret the penal laws, because they are not legislators. . . . In every criminal cause the judge should reason syllogistically. The major should be the general law; the minor, the conformity of the action, or its opposition to the laws; the conclusion, liberty, or punishment. If the judge be obliged by the imperfection of the laws, or choose, to make any other, or more syllogisms than this, it will be an introduction to uncertainty. There is nothing more dangerous than the common axiom: the spirit of the laws is to be considered. . . . The spirit of the laws will then be the result of the good, or bad logic of the judge; and this will depend on his good or bad digestion; on the violence of his passions; on the rank, and condition of the accused, or on his connections with the judge; and on all those little circumstances, which change the appearance of objects in the fluctuating mind of man."
beccaria - determinate sentencing
"It is, then, of the greatest importance, that the punishment should succeed the crime as immediately as possible, if we intend, that in the rude minds of the multitude, the seducing picture of the advantage arising from the crime, should instantly awake the attendant idea of punishment. Delaying the punishment serves only to separate these two ideas; and thus affects the minds of the spectators rather as being a terrible fight, than the necessary consequence of a crime; the horror of which should contribute to heighten the idea of the punishment."
beccaria: general deterrence and celerity
social mechanics
quetelet
people are motivated by forces external to will
positivism
find causes of crime
positivism
rational thinkers, free choosing, weights cost/benefits
classical - beccaria
concerned with criminal justice system
classical
society produces crime
quetelet
we can calculate amount and type of crime based on type of society
quetelet
wealth leads to moral depravity
quetelet
proposed system of moral education --> taught self-control
quetlet
can't see morality so looked at people's faces
quetelet - positivism
In the study of human affairs we rely on the same principles used to study other natural causes."
quetelet
"The crimes which are annually committed seem to be a necessary result of our social organization. . . . Society prepares the crime, and the guilty are only the instruments by which it is executed."
quetelet
"The share of prisons, chains, and the scaffold appears fixed with as much probability as the revenues of the state. We are able to enumerate in advance how many individuals will stain their hands with the blood of their fellow creatures, how many will be forgers, [and] how many poisoners."
quetelet
atavism
cesare lombroso
stigmata
lombroso
indeterminate sentencing
lombroso
lombroso
positivist
focused solely on body/face of criminal --> tells if inherently criminal
lombroso
a lot of criminal behavior results from clinical disorders (epilepsy) --> revised ideas to look at social factors
lombroso
born criminals = 1/3
lombroso
The most ferocious animals are physiognomically close to the born criminal; tigers and hyenas have bloodshot gray eyes identical to those of assassins.
lombroso
In general, thieves are notable for their expressive faces and manual dexterity, small wandering eyes that are often oblique in form, thick and close eybrows, distorted or squashed noses, thin beards and hair, and sloping foreheads. Like rapists, they often have jug ears.
lombroso
tattoos = primitive/inferior tribesman; immune to pain; atavistic carry over
lombroso
lack of a moral system caused by major social change
Durkheim
human appetite deregulated
Durkheim
crime is whatever assaults the collective conscience
Durkheim
Durkheim was a ____ theorist
classical
mechanical solidarity
Durkheim
organic solidarity
Durkheim
division of labor
Durkheim
collective conscience
Durkheim
Functions of crime
Durkheim - solidarity function, transformative function, diagnostic function
anomie - organic societies
Durkheim
people keep consuming, can't be satisfied = suicide and crime
Durkheim
property crimes increase and violent crimes decrease for modernizing nations --> refutes whose theory
Durkheim anomie theory
"For its part, crime must no longer be conceived of as an evil which cannot be circumscribed closely enough. Far from there being cause for congratulation when it drops too noticeably below the normal level, this apparent progress assuredly coincides with and is linked to some social disturbance"
Durkheim
structural functionalism
Merton
rejection of cultural goals/means
Merton
macrosociology
Merton
microsociology
Merton
criminals are normal --> society is screwed up and they adapt to bad situations
Merton
goals and means come from culture structure of society
Merton
everyone give same goals regardless of means --> leads to modes of adaptation
Merton
effective equilibrium
Merton
malintegrated cutlure - overemphasized means or goals
Merton
deprivation theory
Merton
criticized for not accounting for white collar crimes
Merton
social structure made up of social classes
Merton
cultural structure made up of goals and means
Merton
conformity
+goals +means Merton
innovation
+goals -meanMerton
ritualism
-goals +means Merton
retreatism
- goals - means Merton
rebellion
reject and replace Merton
"A high frequency of deviant behavior is not generated merely by lack of opportunity . . . It is only when a system of cultural values extols, virtually above all else, certain common success-goals for the population at large while the social structure rigorously restricts or completely closes access to approved modes of reaching these goals for a considerable part of the same population, that deviant behavior ensues on a large scale
Merton
"Today, as then, we have still much to learn about the processes through which social structures generate the circumstances in which infringement of social codes constitutes a 'normal' (that is to say, an expectable) response. . . . Our primary aim is to discover how some social structures exert a definite pressure upon certain persons in the society to engage in nonconforming rather than conforming conduct. If we can locate groups peculiarly subject to such pressures, we should expect to find fairly high rates of deviant behavior in these groups, not because the human beings comprising them are compounded of distinctive biological tendencies but because they are responding normally to the social situation in which they find themselves. Our perspective is sociological. . . . Should our quest be at all successful, some forms of deviant behavior will be found to be as psychologically normal as conforming behavior, and the equation of deviation and psychological abnormality will be put in question
MErton
"The theory holds that any extreme emphasis upon achievement—whether this be scientific productivity, accumulation of personal wealth or, by a small stretch of the imagination, the conquests of a Don Juan—will attenuate conformity to the institutional norms governing behavior designed to achieve the particular form of 'success,' especially among those who are socially disadvantaged in the competitive race. It is the conflict between cultural goals and the availability of using institutional means—whatever the character of the goals—which produces a strain toward anomie."
Merton
anomie = lack of regulation from noneconomic institutions
Messner and Rosenfeld
compare US crime rate to nations with similar economies
Messner and Rosenfeld
Why does the United States have far higher crime rates than other western industrial nations?
Messner and Rosenfeld
cultural and tautology --> sought to explain why culture is the way it is
Messner and Rosenfeld
root cultrual cause of US's high crime rate
American Dream
what is the American Dream? Who said it?
"The American Dream refers to a commitment to the goal of material success, to be pursued by everyone in society, under conditions of open individual competition."
Messner and Rosenfeld
What are the four dimensions of the AMerican dream?
achievement, individualism, universalism, fetishism of money
what applies internal social controls in institutional anomie thoery
culture structure
what applies external social controls in institutional anomie thoery
social structure
what are the 5 social structures?
economy, polity, family, religion, education
what is goal in institutional anomie?
monetary success
what is the means in institutional anomie?
technical efficiency
What are the 3 consequences of a dominant capitalist society on other institutions?
devaluation, accommodation, penetration
what is functionalism and which theory does it go with?
institutions support each other and hold others up when they are weak - messier and rosenfeld institutional anomie
what is criticism of M and R institutional anomie theory?
can't account for fluctuating crime rates today and declining crime rate. they say even at its lowest, it is still high; robbery declined but US is more violent (technical efficiency)