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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. False dilemma
  2. Logical negation
  3. Conclusion Identification Method
  4. Probability indicators
  5. Primary Objective #1
  1. a Refer to the likelihood of occurence or the obligation present, as in "The mayor should resign." "the law will never pass." Examples: (do not need to memorize) must, will, always, not always, probably, likely, would, never, rarely, could, not necessarily. \n
  2. b Determine whether the stimulus contains an argument or if it is only a set of factual statements. MUST recognize whether a conclusion is present.
  3. c To logically negate a conditional statement, negate the necessary condition. Example: neither...nor becomes either...or.
  4. d Take the statements under consideration and place them in an arrangement that forces once to be the conclusion and the other(s) to be the premise (s). Use premise and conclusion indicators to achieve this end. Once the pieces are arranged, determine if the arrangement makes logical sense. If so, you have the conclusion. If not reverse the arrangement.
  5. e assumes that only 2 courses of action are available when there may be others. \n

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. To raise a viewpoint at the beginning of the stimulus and then disagree with it immediately thereafter. The stimulus often begins with: Some people claim... Some people propose... Many people believe... Some argue that... Some critics claim... Some scientists believe...
  2. If all 5 answer choices appear to be "losers", return to the stimulus and re-evaluate the argument.
  3. If an answer choice describes an event that did not occur in the stimulus, then that answer is incorrect. Watch for answers that are partially true, that is answers that contain a description of something that happened in the argument but that also contain additional things that did not occur. Assess the argument as to it's validity. Be aware of premise and conclusion indicators. This helps better understand the structure of the argument and helps understand the answer choices.\n
  4. if, when, whenever, every, all, any, people who, in order to.
  5. used to introduce other premises that support the conclusion but are sometimes non-essential to the conclusion furthermore, moreover, besides, in addition, whats more, after all.

5 True/False questions

  1. Quantity indicatorsRefer to the likelihood of occurence or the obligation present, as in "The mayor should resign." "the law will never pass." Examples: (do not need to memorize) must, will, always, not always, probably, likely, would, never, rarely, could, not necessarily. \n

          

  2. Primary Objective #2If the stimulus contains an argument, identify the conclusion. If the stimulus contains a fact set, examine each fact.

          

  3. Source argument AKA ad hominenTo logically negate a conditional statement, negate the necessary condition. Example: neither...nor becomes either...or.

          

  4. Counter Premise Indicatorsbecause, since, for, for example, for the reason that, in that, given that, as indicated by, due to, owing to, this can be seen from, we know this by.

          

  5. False analogyoccurs when the author uses an analogy that is two disimilar to the original situation to be applicable. \n