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22 terms

The Tale of Custard the Dragon

Ballad poem vocabulary terms
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ballad poem
a narrative poem often of folk origin intended to be sung- simple stanza- usually with a recurrent refrain.
refrain
The repetition of one or more phrases or lines at definite intervals in a poem, usually at the end of a stanza
onomatopoeia
the use of words that by their sound suggest their meaning
simile
comparison of two unlike things using like or as
metaphor
a figure of speech comparing to unlike things without using like or as
personification
A figure of speech in which an object or animal is given human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes
irony
difference between what appears to be true and what really is; an event or outcome which is unexpected or surprising to the reader and logically would not have occurred
cutlass bright
A short heavy sword with a curved single-edged blade, once used as a weapon by sailors.
flagon
a large vessel with a handle and spout used for holding wine and liquors
grog
a drink, usually diluted, and made from rum
rhythm
the pattern or flow of sound created by the arrangement of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry
end rhyme
Rhyme that occurs at the end of two or more lines of poetry
approximate rhyme
rhyme in which the final sounds of words are similar but not identical
internal rhyme
a rhyme between words in the same line
couplet
a stanza consisting of two successive lines of verse that sometimes rhyme
quatrain
A four lined stanza
exact rhyme
perfect rhyme, such as buzz and fuzz
tone
The attitude of the author toward the audience and characters (e.g., serious or humorous).
alliteration
repetition of initial consonant sounds
assonance
Repetition of a vowel sound within two or more words in close proximity
Percival
Percival is describe in the legends of Camelot as uneducated, not well-dressed, and lacking all of the heroic qualities of a knight. This could be because he was raised by his mother deep in the forest and had never seen a knight, a sword, or for that matter, even a horse. Nonetheless, Percival manages (through dumb-luck, innocence, or whatever you might call it) to get the Grail that Arthur's knights hadn't even been able to get their hands on. So Percival could be described as a hero in sheep's clothes
invented words
words made up by the poet