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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Sole Proprietor
  2. Common Mistake
  3. Elements of Tort
  4. Proximate Cause
  5. Remedies
  1. a both parties are mistaken about the main aspect of the contract (agree of selling of a car but in the meantime the car has been seriously vandalized)
  2. b A court will award money or other relief to a party injured by a breach of contract
  3. c 1. Duty 2. Breach 3. Causation 4. Damage
  4. d is the cause that immediately and directly results in a specific event. if a person can eleminate any one of the 4 elemants, the lawsuit will not be successful.
  5. e a business owned and controlled by one person.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. (law) the determination by a court of competent jurisdiction on matters submitted to it
  2. In some cases, if a project is not bid under a guaranteed amount by the designer, the fees will be reduced or eliminated
  3. Damages must have been mitigated, be measureable with reasonable certainty, be foreseeable and be caused be the breach
  4. a representative who acts on behalf of other persons or organizations
  5. Unconscionability is generally not a defense against enforcement. Unconscionability can be substantive, i.e. the terms are unfair, or procedural, i.e. the process was unfair.

5 True/False questions

  1. Piercing the VeilA doctrine that says if a shareholder dominates a corporation and uses it for improper purposes, a court of equity can:
    Disregard the corporate entity, and
    Hold the shareholder personally liable for the corporation's debts and obligations

          

  2. Trespassersomeone who intrudes on the privacy or property of another without permission

          

  3. Industry Customa sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury

          

  4. Burden of ProofThe obligation to present evidence to support one's claim

          

  5. Common Lawa system of jurisprudence based on judicial precedents rather than statutory laws