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Terms in this set (32)

- The birdie is served diagonally across the net.
- The first serve in a game is always started from the right side of the court.
- In singles, when the score is even, the server serves from the right service court.
- When the score is odd, the server serves from the left service court. In doubles, when the score is even, the player standing in the right service court serves and when the score is odd, the player standing in the left service court serves.
- The server continues to serve until their side fails to make a legal serve or return. The server alternates service areas after each point.
The server and the receiver must be standing in their own service box on the serve.
- In doubles, only the intended receiver may return a legal serve.
- The server must contact the birdie below their waist and their wrist.
- The server's feet must maintain contact with the ground and must remain stationary until the birdie has been served. The receiver also may not move their feet until the birdie has been served.
- A legal singles serve would land in the area bounded by the center line, the singles long service line, the singles sideline and the short service line (long and narrow).
- A legal doubles serve would land in the area bounded by the center line, the doubles long service line, the doubles side line and the short service line (short and wide).
- Once the serve is made in doubles, the court area is bounded by the doubles sideline and the back boundary line.
- The server may not serve until the receiver is ready. If a return is attempted, the receiver shall be deemed ready.
- If the server, in attempting to serve, misses the birdie it is a fault.
- If the service would not have landed in the proper court, but the intended receiver touches the birdie before it hits the floor, the birdie remains in play.