Sullivan's Wordwright #2 Gold Division

STUDY
PLAY
bile
A substance produced by the liver that breaks up fat particles.
impugn
to call into question; to attack verbally
vituperation
verbal abuse or castigation; violent denunciation or condemnation.
abolitionist
A person who wanted to end slavery
vacillate
To sway physically; to be indecisive
loath
unwilling, reluctant
oblivion
state of being forgotten
solace
Comfort or consolation in a time of distress or sadness
din
Loud noise
venture
(n.) a risky or daring undertaking; (v.) to expose to danger; to dare
insurgent
(n.) one who rebels or rises against authority; (adj.) rising in revolt, refusing to accept authority; surging or rushing in or on
duration
length of time something lasts
ascribe
Assign or credit to a certain cause or source
attribute
(n.) a quality or characteristic belonging to or associated with someone or something; (v.) to assign to, credit with; to regard as caused by or resulting from
vitriol
(adj.) bitter, sarcastic; highly caustic or biting (like a strong acid)
invective
abusive language
malign
(v.) - to slander, to smear, to libel, to defame, to speak evil of
mulish
stubborn
bemoan
complain about
hearth
The region from which innovative ideas originate.
(n.) the floor of a fireplace; the fireside as a symbol of the home and family
slipshod
(adj.) untidy in dress, personal habits, etc.; careless, sloppy
duplicity
(n.) treachery, deceitfulness
expiration
breathing out
impending
about to happen
depreciate
to reduce in price or value
discern
to perceive or recognize
unrequited
not reciprocated or returned in kind
providence
Rhode Island
The guidance, material goods, and care provided by God that is sufficient to meet our needs.
providential
Lucky, fortunate, or relating to divine care (the idea that a deity has helped or cared for a person)
capitulation
surrender; ending resistance
yahoo
a boorish, crass, or stupid person
revile
(v.) to attack with words, call bad names
infuse
to inject; to fill something or someone with
colloquial
Characteristic of ordinary conversation rather than formal speech or writing
puerile
Juvenile, immature
distillation
A process that separates the substances in a solution based on their boiling points
engross
(v.) to occupy the complete attention, absorb fully
avert
To turn away
magnitude
Greatness of size, strength, or importance
scourge
(v.) To whip, punish severely; (n.) A cause of affliction or suffering; a source of severe punishment or criticism
malice
Desire to harm others
syntactic
grammatical
anaphora
A rhetorical figure of repetition in which the same word or phrase is repeated in (and usually at the beginning of) successive lines, clauses, or sentences.
alliteration
It is a stylistic device in which a number of words, having the same first consonant sound, occur close together in a series.
paradox
A statement or proposition that seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth.
irony
A literary device that uses contradictory statements or situations to reveal a reality different from what appears to be true.
climactic
relating to the highest point
paralepsis
Emphasizing a point by seeming to pass over it
parallelism
Phrases or sentences of a similar construction/meaning placed side by side, balancing each other
oxymoron
A figure of speech that combines opposite or contradictory terms in a brief phrase.
chiasmus
A statement consisting of two parallel parts in which the second part is structurally reversed
synecdoche
a figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or vice versa
tricolon
Sentence consisting of three parts of equal importance and length, usually three independent clauses.
polysyndeton
The deliberate use of a series of conjunctions.
progression
a going forth, a movement toward
balance
Symmetry
metonymy
(mĕtŏn′ ĭmē) A term from the Greek meaning "changed label" or "substitute name," metonymy is a figure of speech in which the name of one object is substituted for that of another closely associated with it. For example, a news release that claims "the White House declared" rather than "the President declared" is using metonymy; Shakespeare uses it to signify the male and female sexes in As You Like It: "doublet and hose ought to show itself courageous to petticoat." The substituted term generally carries a more potent emotional impact.
antithesis
A statement in which two opposing ideas are balanced
rhetorical question
A question asked merely for rhetorical effect and not requiring an answer
periodic sentence
A sentence that presents its central meaning in a main clause at the end.
inversion
A sentence in which the verb precedes the subject.
asyndeton
A construction in which elements are presented in a series without conjunctions
double entendre
a statement that has two meanings, one of which is dirty or vulgar