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Period 2: 1607-1754

Key Concepts:

Terms in this set (24)

DEFINITION FROM WIKIPEDIA.ORG:
The French colonization of the Americas began in the 16th century, and continued on into the following centuries as France established a colonial empire in the Western Hemisphere. France founded colonies in much of eastern North America, on a number of Caribbean islands, and in South America. Most colonies were developed to export products such as fish, sugar, and furs.
Dutch trading posts and plantations in the Americas precede the much wider known colonization activities of the Dutch in Asia. When the first Dutch fort in Asia was built in 1600 (in present-day Indonesia), the first forts and settlements on the Essequibo River in Guyana and on the Amazon date from the 1590s. Actual colonization, with Dutch settling in the new lands, was not as common as with other European nations. Many of the Dutch settlements were lost or abandoned by the end of the 17th century, but the Netherlands managed to retain possession of Suriname until it gained independence in 1975, as well as the Netherlands Antilles, of which the islands remain within the Kingdom of the Netherlands today.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE:
The French or Dutch were not as prominent as the Spanish or English, but were nevertheless important. The French allied with certain Indian tribes due to the French's desired fur trade, and would come into confrontations with the British colonies. The Dutch owned the important harbor of New Amsterdam, which would become New York City, when it was purchased by the British.
DEFINITION FROM WIKIPEDIA.ORG:
Disease in colonial America that afflicted the early immigrant settlers was a dangerous threat to life. Some of the diseases were new and treatments were ineffective. Malaria was deadly to many new arrivals, especially in the Southern colonies. Of newly arrived able-bodied young men, over one-fourth of the Anglican missionaries died within five years of their arrival in the Carolinas. Mortality was high for infants and small children, especially for diphtheria, yellow fever, and malaria. Most sick people turn to local healers, and used folk remedies. Others relied upon the minister-physicians, barber-surgeons, apothecaries, midwives, and ministers; a few used colonial physicians trained either in Britain, or an apprenticeship in the colonies. One common treatment was blood letting. The method was crude due to a lack of knowledge about infection and disease among medical practitioners. There was little government control, regulation of medical care, or attention to public health. By the 18th century, Colonial physicians, following the models in England and Scotland, introduced modern medicine to the cities in the 18th century, and made some advances in vaccination, pathology, anatomy and pharmacology.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE:
Epidemic diseases were the key reason to the decimation of many indigenous people in North America, such as the Native Americans. These diseases were brought from Europe and wiped out a significant amount of the native population.