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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. aggregate demand
  2. AD-AS model
  3. aggregate supply
  4. immediate-short-run, short-run, long-run
  5. interest-rate effect
  1. a The BLANK BLANK curve shows the level of real output that the economy demands at each price level.
  2. b The BLANK-BLANK-BLANK aggregate supply curve assumes that both input prices and output prices are fixed. With output prices fixed, the aggregate supply curve is a horizontal line at the current price level. The BLANK-BLANK aggregate supply curve assumes nominal wages and other input prices remain fixed while output prices vary. The aggregate supply curve is generally upsloping because per-unit production costs, and hence the prices that firms must receive, rise as real output expands. The aggregate supply curve is relatively steep to the right of the full-employment output level and relatively flat to the left of it. The BLANK-BLANK aggregate supply curve assumes that nominal wages and other input prices fully match any change in the price level. The curve is vertical at the full-employment output level.
  3. c The tendency for increases in the price level to increase the demand for money, raise interest rates, and, as a result, reduce total spending and real output in the economy (and the reverse for price-level decreases).
  4. d A schedule or curve showing the total quantity of goods and services supplied (produced) at different price levels.
  5. e The macroeconomic model that uses aggregate demand and aggregate supply to determine and explain the price level and the real domestic output.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. The determinants of aggregate demand consist of spending by domestic BLANKS, by businesses, by BLANK, and by foreign buyers. The extent of the shift is determined by the size of the initial change in spending and the strength of the economy's BLANK.
  2. A measure of average output or real output per unit of input. For example, the productivity of labor is determined by dividing real output by hours of work.
  3. Because the short-run aggregate supply curve is the only version of aggregate supply that can handle BLANK changes in the price level and real output, it serves well as the core aggregate supply curve for analyzing the business cycle and economic policy.
  4. Shifts of the aggregate demand curve to the left of the full-employment output cause BLANK, negative GDP gaps, and BLANK unemployment. The price level may not fall during recessions because of downwardly BLANKABLE prices and wages. This results from fear of price wars, menu costs, wage contracts, efficiency wages, and minimum wages. When the price level is fixed, changes in aggregate demand produce full-strength multiplier effects.
  5. The gross domestic product at which the total quantity of final goods and services purchased (aggregate expenditures) is equal to the total quantity of final goods and services produced (the real domestic output); the real domestic output at which the aggregate demand curve intersects the aggregate supply curve.

5 True/False questions

  1. aggregate demandA schedule or curve showing the total quantity of goods and services supplied (produced) at different price levels.

          

  2. demand, supplyA schedule or curve showing the total quantity of goods and services supplied (produced) at different price levels.

          

  3. efficiency wagesA wage that minimizes wage costs per unit of output by encouraging greater effort or reducing turnover.

          

  4. equilibrium price levelThe gross domestic product at which the total quantity of final goods and services purchased (aggregate expenditures) is equal to the total quantity of final goods and services produced (the real domestic output); the real domestic output at which the aggregate demand curve intersects the aggregate supply curve.

          

  5. determinants of aggregate demandFactors such as input prices, productivity, and the legal-institutional environment that, if they change, shift the aggregate supply curve.