12 terms

TYPE CLASSIFICATION week 2 quiz

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HUMANIST SERIF
First appeared in the 15th century Archetype: Jenson (Nicholas Jenson, 1470)
Example: • Centaur
They are the original roman typeface. Strikingly different from Blackletter, the first typeface style inspired by Italian handwriting called 'lettera antica.'
Typical Characteristics:
• Low thick-to-thin stroke contrast
• Angled Stress
• Organic Serifs with gradual bracket • Calligraphic terminals
• Small x-height
• Angled crossbar on the lowercase 'e'
OLD STYLE SERIF
First appeared in the 15th & 16th centuries Archetype: Bembo (Francesco Griffo, 1495)
Examples:
• Garamond • Minion
They are more refined, with smoother and rounder forms than Humanist serifs. Because of improvements in type-making tools, the thick-to thin contrast is more apparent.
Typical Characteristics:
• Medium thick-to-thin stroke contrast
• Oblique Stress
• Bracketed Serifs
• Round open characters
• Horizontal crossbar on the lowercase 'e'
TRANSITIONAL SERIF
First appeared in the 18th century
Archetype: Baskerville (John Baskerville, 1754)
Examples:
• Caslon
• Mrs. Eaves
• Times New Roman
Inspired by engraving. More mechanical in construction, the bracketed serifs are sharper and refined— far more than humanist or old style yet not extreme, like Modern serif faces.
Typical Characteristics:
• Medium to high thick-to-thin stroke contrast • Slight Oblique to Vertical Stress
• Moderately thin Bracketed Serifs
• Round open characters
• Tall x-height
• Horizontal crossbar on the lowercase 'e'
MODERN SERIF
First appeared in the 18th century Archetype: Didot (Firmin Didot, 1784)
Examples: • Bodoni
• Walbaum
Advances in letterform making and printing methods made possible the superfine and unbracketed horizontal serifs that typify Modern serif faces.
Typical Characteristics:
• Very high thick-to-thin stroke contrast
• Vertical Stress
• Hairline Unbracketed Serifs
• Tall x-height
• Horizontal crossbar on the lowercase 'e'
CLARENDON SLAB SERIF
First appeared in the 19th century Archetype: Clarendon (Robert Besley, 1845)
Examples: • Volta
• Stag
Clarendons appear more refined than Egyptian Slabs primarily because of the bracketed serifs.
A distinct trait is the bulbous ball terminals
seen on characters such as lowercase 'c', 'f', and 'y'
Typical Characteristics:
• Low thick-to-thin stroke contrast
• Vertical Stress
• Square Bracketed Serifs
• Round Ball Terminals
• Horizontal crossbar on the lowercase 'e'
EGYPTIAN SLAB SERIF
First appeared in the 19th century Archetype: Rockwell (Frank Pierpont, 1934)
Examples: • Memphis • Archer
Historically, they worked well as display faces, notably for advertising. Contemporary slabs are typically more versatile than past models.
Typical Characteristics:
• Very low to uniform thick-to-thin stroke contrast • Vertical Stress
• Square Unbracketed Serifs
• Horizontal crossbar on the lowercase 'e'
GROTESQUE SANS SERIF
First appeared in the 19th century
Archetype: Akzidenz-Grotesk (Gunter Lange, 1898)
Examples:
• Franklin Gothic • Bell Gothic
The first commercially widespread sans serif typefaces. They inspired Transitional sans serifs, which date from the mid 20th century.
Typical Characteristics:
• Slight thick-to-thin stroke contrast
• Vertical Stress
• Curved strokes like 'C' end at an angle
GEOMETRIC SANS SERIF
First appeared in the 19th century Archetype: Futura (Paul Renner, 1928)
Examples:
• Avant Garde • Gotham
• FF Din
Inspired by geometry and modularity. Typically based on circles and squares or triangles, they are rational in construction.
Typical Characteristics:
• Uniform stroke contrast • Vertical Stress
HUMANIST SANS SERIF
First appeared in the 20th century Archetype: Gill Sans (Eric Gill, 1930)
Examples: • Meta
• Frutiger • Myriad
Inspired by Humanist Serif faces. A handwritten influence is evident, which distinguishes them from other sans serif faces. Typically feature true italics distinct from the roman characters.
Typical Characteristics:
• Very low think-to-thin or uniform stroke contrast • Slight Oblique to Vertical Stress
• Calligraphic Influence
• True Italics
TRANSITIONAL SANS SERIF
First appeared in the 20th century Archetype: Univers (Adrian Frutiger, 1957)
Examples:
• Helvetica
• National
• Corporate S
Began as refreshed Grotesques, which were specific to the 19th and early 20th centuries. Have curved letterforms such as 'c', 'e', and 's' that end horizontally rather than an angle. Oblique italics are common.
Typical Characteristics:
• Uniform stroke contrast
• Vertical Stress
• Neutral Personality
• Curved strokes end horizontally
SCRIPT
Examples:
• Bickham Script • Edwardian Script • Tangier
Traditionally, script typefaces emulate handwriting or calligraphy, whether its letters are a graceful, connected cursive or the scribbles of everyday writing. Having both formal and informal categories, scripts can also be sorted by the writing tool, such as pen or brush.
Typical Characteristics:
• Most are slanted— slant can vary throughout, but formal scripts usually have a consistent angle
DISPLAY/GRAPHIC/DECORATIVE
Examples:
• Ed Interlock • Art Deco
• Rosewood
Display or decorative faces have illustrative and ornamental characteristics that enhance or have been added to an underlying letterform structure. Victorian and Art Deco influences. They can work as headlines, initials, or logotypes, but should never be used for text and typically never at small sizes.
Typical Characteristics:
• expressive and ornamental