TSA Writing Skills Assessment Test

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Terms in this set (...)

For questions 1, 2, and 3 choose the one answer that represents a correction that should be made to the sentence. If no correction is necessary, choose (D).
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1. Once a request to carry firearms into a foreign country are approved, a Transportation Security Inspector must notify the Office of Foreign Operations for coordination of the request.

A) change "to carry" to "for carrying'
B) change "are" to "is"
C) change "coordination" to "coordinating"
D) no correction is necessary
B) change "are" to "is"

A verb must agree with its subject in number. The subject, "request," is singular and, therefore, the verb should be changed from "are" to "is."
2. Supervisor Smith knows that it is important for his Transportation Security Inspectors to understand each of the fundamental principals that apply to all methods of dog training.

A) change "knows" that to "knows which"
B) change "each" to "each and every one"
C) change "principals" to "principles"
D) no correction is necessary
C) change "principals" to "principles"

The correct use of the word "principles" refers to rules, laws, or standards that are applied to the method of dog training. By contrast, the word "principal" means first or foremost in importance.
3. The geographical area composing much of the border between the United States and Mexico is considered to have a desert climate.

A) change "between" to "from"
B) insert a comma after "area"
C) change "is" to "are"
D) no correction is necessary
D) no correction is necessary
Instructions: For question 4, choose the one answer that is the best revision to the underlined word(s) or phrase(s) in the paragraph. If no revision to the underlined word(s) or phrase(s) is necessary, choose option (E). If there are two underlined sections in the same paragraph, each possible answer will consist of two revisions, one for each underlined section. The two revisions will be separated by a slash ( / ). The first revision will be for the first underlined section in the paragraph, and the second revision will be for the second underlined section in the paragraph.
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4. The passenger's use of a fraudulent document was a hindrence to the identification of the passenger.

(A) fraudelant / hindrence
(B) fraudulant / hindrence
(C) fraudulent / hindrance
(D) fraudulant / hindrance
(E) no correction is necessary
(C) fraudulent / hindrance

The words "fraudulent" and "hindrance" are spelled correctly in this sentence while various incorrect spellings of these words are used in A, B, and D.
For questions 5 and 6, select the correct paragraph order to create a passage that is well-organized, clear, and coherent. If no correction is necessary, choose (D).
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5.
(1) TSA also recognizes that transportation assets, such as airplanes and tunnels, are part of larger systems, such as the national aviation system or a mass transit system. Taken together, all the individual transportation systems form the national transportation system (i.e., a "system of systems"). The behavior of transportation systems cannot be fully explained by confining observations to individual cars, vessels, and aircraft or fixed infrastructure. An attack on a specific asset must be analyzed for how it will impact the larger transportation system within which it resides. Impacts to a specific transportation system may then have ripple-effects on other transportation systems that could result in cascading failures.

(2) In December 2005, we made a risk-based choice to change our operations to better meet this threat. Before the change, our screening workforce was spending a lot of time searching for items that no longer posed a significant risk - items that would no longer be useful to terrorists intent on taking control of an aircraft. Based on analysis of threats, vulnerabilities and consequences, we removed the most innocuous of these from our list of items that are prohibited beyond the checkpoint. The time and labor we used to spend detecting them has been shifted to finding explosives instead.

(3) The nature of the current threat has changed since September 11, 2001. The deployment of measures like hardened cockpit doors, the Federal Flight Deck Officer Program, a vastly expanded Transportation Security Inspector Program, and others have greatly reduced the risk of an attack similar to those of September 11. Today, explosives pose the greatest risk to our transportation systems.

(4) Delivering the best security we can means using risk to guide our decisions - maximizing our resources by directing them where they are most needed. Working with our network of federal and industry partners, we identify the areas of greatest risk throughout transportation systems and act to prevent attacks and mitigate their potential consequences. To meet future threats, we are ensuring that we maintain surge capacity to respond when and where they emerge.

A) 4 - 3 - 2 - 1
B) 3 - 4 - 1 - 2
C) 2 - 3 - 4 - 1
D) no correction is necessary
A) 4 - 3 - 2 - 1

The most logical order of the passages is 4, 3, 2, 1. It is not logical to begin the passages with paragraphs 2 or 3, as indicated in Responses B and C, because they appear to complete information that has been presented earlier and, therefore, depend on information in the other two paragraphs in order to be understood. This also eliminates Response D. This leaves Response A, which begins with paragraph 4. The paragraphs presented in this order form a well-organized, coherent passage.
6.
(1) Immediately following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) was closed to general aviation aircraft because of its proximity to downtown Washington, D.C.

(2) After conducting a thorough security review in partnership with other Departments of Homeland Security and Defense agencies, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) developed a security plan that balances the special security needs of the airport with the economic importance of general aviation flights.

(3) ASOs are specially trained law enforcement officers who are authorized by the TSA to fly onboard each general aviation aircraft operating into or out of DCA.

(4) The plan, called the DCA Access Standard Security Program, or DASSP, allows a total of 48 general aviation flights a day leaving from designated "gateway airports." All of these flights must have an Armed Security Officer (ASO) onboard.

A) 1 - 4 - 2 - 3
B) 1 - 4 - 3 - 2
C) 1 - 2 - 4 - 3
D) no correction is necessary
C) 1 - 2 - 4 - 3

The most logical order of the passages is 1, 2, 4, 3. The first paragraph introduces the issue and sets the stage for the remaining paragraphs describing the actions taken to address the issue. Accordingly, paragraph 1 should be the first paragraph. Paragraphs 2 and 4 elaborate on the resolution to the issue introduced in paragraph 1 and therefore must follow paragraph 1. Paragraph 2 logically comes before paragraph 4 because paragraph 2 explains that a plan was put in place whereas paragraph 4 elaborates on the specifics of the plan. Finally, paragraph 3 is clearly the concluding paragraph because it further defines the role of the ASO which is introduced in paragraph 4. The paragraphs presented in this order form a well-organized, coherent passage.