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Terms in this set (78)

Revolutions: it brought the public together, which made connections between the townspeople easier because of their common goals. For example, the nationalism exemplified in the French Revolution was mostly by the peasants and commoners who felt they were being left out of the government and not being treated fairly. This caused them to turn their backs on the government, together. This makes it hard for a government to rule, once they do not have the support of their population. Another example could be that during the Haitian Revolution, the Haitians took it upon themselves, as a nation, to gain sovereignty. Because they were already a nation, nationalism only drove them further towards their goals, and brought them even closer together as people under their own control.
Unification Movements: nationalism served to unite people under one common goal. Sometimes the mutual goal of creating a better home, or the hatred of the people putting them down is enough to make them want to take control and follow through. For example, the nationalism exemplified in the French Revolution was mostly by the peasants and commoners who felt they were being left out of the government and not being treated fairly. This caused them to turn their backs on the government, together. This makes it hard for a government to rule, once they do not have the support of their population.
Decline of Empires: it often helped to widen the divide between either different groups of one population, or between the government and its people. For example, in the final days of the French Revolution, excessive nationalism created paranoia that tore apart the government. Robespierre for example, had a goal of creating a French Republic, and ridding the country of a monarchy. However, when this was achieved, he felt that he would lose all of his new found power, which led him to take the revolution even farther into the Radical Age. This led to his decline when the people saw that he did not have the best of intentions for them, but an increase in power. They then beheaded him, via guillotine.
The Atlantic Revolutions reflected the influence of early modern historical developments in many ways. The Haitian Revolution was the first successful slave revolt in history, which paved the way for arguments about the moral human rights issues that were presented by slavery, and showed that slaves were always needed. In Latin America, it injected a deep caution and social conservatism in the elites that led their countries to independence in the early nineteenth century. By the early twentieth century, most nations had outlawed slavery. Also, the ideas of liberty and equality, which many of the Atlantic Revolution leaders had borrowed from the enlightenment, became further known, and led to ideas such as feminism and universal suffrage, and gave birth to an array of equal rights movements. It also gave birth to the idea that human political and social arrangements could be engineered, and improved, by human action. The success of the Haitians inspired by the French revolution, mostly, a group of slaves, showed the true power of human action and what people could accomplish.
The Atlantic Revolutions also allowed for nationalistic ideas to become more widely accepted. Having immense pride in one's country was a newer concept that was heavily brought on by the revolutions that were occurring, and helped them fight as one for their nation. In Spanish America, the creoles sought independence from their Spanish rulers and used nationalism to advance their cause. For the first time, people around the world were standing tall as a nation and took pride in the country that they belonged to.