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Psychosexual Theory of Development

Growth and Lifespan Development: Major Theories of Development
STUDY
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Psychosexual Theory
Freud's theory which emphasized that how parents manage their child's sexual and aggressive drives in he first few years is crucial for healthy personality development
Psychosexual Theory
five-stage model of child development based on sexual instinct (oral, anal, phallic, latency, and genital phases)
no further personality development in adulthood
Psychosexual Theory
freud; focuses on unconcious and drives (sex and aggression)
Psychosexual Theory
personality develops through a series of childhood stages during which the pleasure-seeking energies of the id become focused on certain erogenous areas
Psychosexual Theory
Sigmund Freud: This theory is through adolescence. He studied the effects of our internal drives on the emotional outcome on the individual. He only conceptualized this development spanning the period from birth until adolescence. This theory is rarely used for research, but it continues to influence our thinking.
Psychosexual Theory
human beings, from birth, possess an instinctual libido (sexual appetite) that develops in five stages. Each stage — the oral, the anal, the phallic, the latent, and the genital — is characterized by the erogenous zone that is the source of the libidinal drive.
Psychosexual Theory
Sigmund Freud proposed that if the child experienced anxiety, thwarting his or her sexual appetite during any libidinal (psychosexual) development stage, said anxiety would persist into adulthood as a neurosis, a functional mental disorder.
Sigmund Freud
Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939); Said that human behavior is irrational; behavior is the outcome of conflict between the id (irrational unconscious driven by sexual, aggressive, and pleasure-seeking desires) and ego (rationalizing conscious, what one can do) and superego (ingrained moral values, what one should do).
Sigmund Freud
Founder of the Psychoanalytical school of thought
Sigmund Freud
person: Said that a child's personality develops through a predictable pattern of stages. ________believed the emotional or psychological problems of adults are connected to how their parents and care providers met their basic needs as children.
Psychosexual Theory
(psychoanalysis) the process during which personality and sexual behavior mature through a series of stages: first oral stage and then anal stage and then phallic stage and then latency stage and finally genital stage
Psychosexual Theory
This is from infancy to adulthood. Each stage refers to the bodily zone that produces the main source of gratification during the stage. Each stage has its own conflict to resolve. This will determine personality traits.
Sexual infantilism
delayed puberty
Sexual infantilism
In pursuing and satisfying his or her libido (sexual drive), the child might experience failure (parental and societal disapproval) and thus might associate anxiety with the given erogenous zone.
Sexual infantilism
To avoid anxiety, the child becomes fixated, preoccupied with the psychologic themes related to the erogenous zone in question, which persist into adulthood, and underlie the personality and psychopathology of the man or woman, as neurosis, hysteria, personality disorders, et cetera.
oral stage
(psychoanalysis) the first sexual and social stage of an infant's development
oral stage
Freud, psychosexual stage of development; age: 0-18 months; focus: oral cavity; task: transition from bottle/breast to solid food; conflict: id derives pleasure from sucking/excepting into mouth; if child fails to complete tasks, (s)he becomes fixated; fixations-underindulged oral-suspicious, sarcastic, pessimistic, trust issues; overindulged oral-clingy, optimistic, gullible, needy
oral stage
The initial phase of psychosexual development, during which the mouth is the primary source of gratification; a time when the infant is learning to trust or mistrust the world.
oral stage
Freud's psychosexual stage from birth-1 year
oral stage
Psychosexual stage in the first year of life, in which the mouth is the center of pleasure.
Anal stage
Freud's second stage of psychosexual development where the primary sexual focus is on the elimination or holding onto feces. The stage is often thought of as representing a child's ability to control his or her own world.
Anal stage
(psychoanalysis) the second sexual and social stage of a child's development during which bowel control is learned
Anal stage
Freud, psychosexual stage of development; age: 1-3 years; focus: anus-retention/expulsion of species; task: to successfully learned toilet training; conflict: id derives pleasure from retention/expulsion, whereas ego and superego represents society the practical/societal pressures to control bodily functions; if child fails to complete the task,(s)he becomes fixated; fixations-anal expulsion-messy, disorganized, reckless, careless, defiant; anal-retentive-neat, precise, orderly, stingy, obstinate, meticulous, passive-aggressive
Anal stage
second stage occurring from about 1 to 3 years of age, in which the anus is the erogenous zone and toilet training is the source of conflict
Anal stage
Anal retentive: Obsessively organized, or excessively neat
Anal expulsive: reckless, careless, defiant, disorganized, coprophiliac
Anal stage
Freud's second stage of psychosexual development where the primary sexual focus is on elimination or holding onto feces. The stage is often thought of as representing child's ability to control his or her own world.
Phallic Stage
(psychoanalysis) the third stage in a child's development when awareness of and manipulation of the genitals is supposed to be a primary source of pleasure
Phallic Stage
Freud's third stage of personality development, from about age 3 through age 6, during which children obtain gratification primarily from the genitals.
Phallic Stage
the psychosexual stage that extends from about 3 to 6 years of age, during which the sexual organs become the primary source of gratification
Phallic Stage
Freud, psychosexual stage of development; age: 3-6 years; focus: genitals; task: Explorer genital region, develop a relationship with parents, especially same gender parent; conflict: Oedipus/Electra complex-child competes with same-sex parents were opposite sex parent's attention; fixations-male-Castration Anxiety-because father possesses mother and therefore has power, dad "castrates" sign (removes power), must prove self, dominant, marries mother figure; female-penis envy-according to Freud penis equals power, submissive, dates older men
Phallic Stage
Sexual tension is focused on the genitals. Girls have penis envy. Boys have castration anxiety.
Latency Stage
(psychoanalysis) the fourth period (from about age 5 or 6 until puberty) during which sexual interests are supposed to be sublimated into other activities
Latency Stage
Psychosexual stage that lasts from the 6th year to the 12th year of life. It is the time when sexual activity is repressed and an abundance of substitute activities are engaged in, such as learning and athletics.
Latency Stage
(6 - 11 years) Sexual energy sublimated into school, sports, art, etc. Competency required
Latency Stage
According to Freud, period of psychosexual development, following the phallic stage, in which the libidinal drives are quelled and children's energy turns toward the development of skills and interests and toward becoming fully socialized to the world; the opposite sex is avoided
Latency Stage
The fourth psychosexual stage, in which the primary focus is on the further development of intellectual, creative, interpersonal, and athletic skills.
Genital Stage
(psychoanalysis) the fifth sexual and social stage in a person's development occurring during adolescence
Genital Stage
Freud's last stage of personality development, from the onset of puberty through adulthood, during which the sexual conflicts of childhood resurface (at puberty) and are often resolved during adolescence).
Genital Stage
puberty, search for partner, gratification from relationships.
Genital Stage
The final stage of psychosexual development, usually attained at adolescence, in which heterosexual interests and activities are generally predominant.
Genital Stage
the fifth and final stage in Freud's theory, beginning in adolescence, in which sexual maturation is complete and sexual intercourse becomes a major goal
unconscious motives
Freud's term for feelings, experiences, and conflicts that influence a person's thinking and behavior, but lie outside the person's awareness.
unconscious motives
Conflicts left over from early childhood, depend on mechanisms to avoid confronting these conflicts, which remain hidden in the depths of the unconscious
repression
in psychoanalytic theory, the basic defense mechanism that banishes from consciousness anxiety-arousing thoughts, feelings, and memories
repression
a type of motivated forgetting in which anxiety-provoking thoughts and conflicts are forced out of conscious awareness
instinct
an inborn biological force that motivates a particular response or class of responses
instinct
inborn pattern of behavior often responsive to specific stimuli
instinct
a behavior that an animal is born with and does not need to learn
id
psychoanalytic term for the inborn component of the personality that is driven by the instincts
id
(psychoanalysis) primitive instincts and energies underlying all psychic activity
id
in Freud's conception, the repository of the basic urges toward sex and agression
id
the part of the unconscious personality that contains our needs, drives, instincts, and repressed material
ego
psychoanalytic term for the rational component of the personality
ego
(psychoanalysis) the conscious mind
ego
the largely conscious, "executive" part of personality that, according to Freud, mediates among the demands of the id, superego, and reality. The ego operates on the reality principle, satisfying the id's desires in ways that will realistically bring pleasure rather than pain
ego
the Latin for "I"; in Freud's theories, the mediator between the demands of the id and the superego
superego
the part of personality that, according to Freud, represents internalized ideals and provides standards for judgment (the conscience) and for future aspirations
superego
the moral component of personality that incorporates social standards about what represents right and wrong
superego
psychoanalytic term for the component of the personality that consists of one's internalized moral standards.
superego
According to Freud, the moral component of personality that incorporates social standards about what represents right and wrong.
superego
psychic structure that corresponds to an internal moral guardian or conscience
birth to 1
oral stage age range
1 to 3
anal stage range
3 to 6
Phallic stage age range
6 to 11
Latency stage age range
12+
Genital stage age range
Oedipus complex
according to Freud, a boy's sexual desires toward his mother and feelings of jealousy and hatred for the rival father.
Oedipus complex
In Freud's theory, a male child's unconscious sexual desire for the opposite-sex parent, usually accompanied by hostile feelings toward the same-sex parent.
Oedipus complex
the unconscious desire of young boys to replace their father and win their mother's exclusive love.
Oedipus complex
according to Freud, a boy's sexual desires towards his mother and feelings of jealousy and hatred for the rival father
Electra complex
conflict during phallic stage in which girls supposedly love their fathers romantically and want to eliminate their mothers as rivals
Electra complex
A pattern described by Freud in which a young girl develops an attachment to her father and competes with her mother for his attention. (Bernstein Psychology 8e p. 555)
Electra complex
a girl's desire for her father
Electra complex
Girl's sexual desire for her father and feelings of jealousy and hatred for the rival mother.
Electra complex
The female version of the Oedipus complex. Electra complex is a term used to describe the psychological conflict of a daughter's unconscious rivalry with her mother for her father's attention. The name comes from the Greek legend of Electra, who avenged the death of her father, Agamemnon, by plotting the death of her mother. See also Oedipus complex, psychological criticism.