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Literature - Top 100 and Plots

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Hamlet
William Shakespeare
Hamlet
Hamlet follows the young prince Hamlet home to Denmark to attend his father's funeral. Hamlet is shocked to find his mother already remarried to his Uncle Claudius, the dead king's brother. And Hamlet is even more surprised when his father's ghost appears and declares that he was murdered. Ophelia commits suicide by drowning herself when her love is rejected by Hamlet. Every principal character is dead by the end except Horatio.
Oedipus Rex
Sophocles
Oedipus Rex
Fulfilling the prophecy, King Oedipus has killed his biological father (Laius), slept with his biological mother (Jocasta) and is now on the path to try to lift the curse on Thebes. When his mother learns that Oedipus is her son in a moment of insight, she kills herself. Oedipus, too, realizes that he was Laius's murderer and that he's been married to (and having children with) his mother. In horror and despair, he gouges his eyes out and is exiled from Thebes.
Macbeth
William Shakespeare
Macbeth
Macbeth is a play of contradiction and ambition. Driven to becoming King, Macbeth will kill all and any that get in his way. He puts his faith in the words and prophesies of three witches, after their first one (that he will become Thane of Cawdor) comes through. Macbeth's wife, Lady Macbeth, is instrumental in his ambition. After becoming king, he is eventually killed by Macduff, and Malcolm becomes the rightful king.
King Lear
William Shakespeare
King Lear
Lear gives up his kingdom to his daughters and then gives up his mind
Othello
William Shakespeare
Othello
Othello, a general in the Venetian army, has offended three men in two actions, Iago who wanted to be named his lieutenant, and he eloped with Desdemona which gets him in trouble with her father (Brabantio) and Roderigo who loves her. A collection of rumors and multiple love triangles ensues. Iago is the root of all confusion and just as his wife, Emilia, begins to reveal his schemes he stabs her to death, and Othello decides to take his own life rather than live without his wife.
The Tempest
William Shakespeare
The Tempest
Prospero uses magic to reclaim his dukedom and find a husband for his daughter, Miranda
Moby-Dick
Herman Melville
Moby-Dick
First Line: Call me Ishmael. Ishmael is the narrator and he accompanies Queequeg and Ahab on a whaling ship to hunt down and kill the Great White Whale, Moby-Dick. At the end their boat is destroyed and every dies except Ishmael.
The Great Gatsby
F Scott Fitzgerald
The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby, follows Jay Gatsby, a man who orders his life around one desire: to be reunited with Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. Gatsby's quest leads him from poverty to wealth, into the arms of his beloved, and eventually to death. Published in 1925, The Great Gatsby is a classic piece of American fiction. It is a novel of triumph and tragedy, noted for the remarkable way Fitzgerald captured a cross-section of American society.
Don Quixote
Miguel de Cervantes
Don Quixote
Don Quixote is a middle-aged gentleman from the region of La Mancha in central Spain. Obsessed with the chivalrous ideals touted in books he has read, he decides to take up his lance and sword to defend the helpless and destroy the wicked. After a first failed adventure, he sets out on a second one with a befuddled laborer named Sancho Panza. On his horse, Rocinante, a barn nag well past his prime, Don Quixote rides the roads of Spain in search of glory and grand adventure. But he usually does more harm than good.
Jane Eyre
Charlotte Brontë
Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre opens with Jane, an orphaned, isolated ten-year-old, living with a family that dislikes her. She grows in strength, excels at school, becomes a governess, and falls in love with Edward Rochester. After being deceived by him, Jane goes to Marsh End, where she regains her spirituality and discovers her own strength. By novel's end, Jane is a strong, independent woman. Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre still raises relevant questions to readers today.
Iliad
Homer
Illiad
Paris of Troy steals his lover Helen of Troy, wife of Odysseus. The Greeks besiege Troy in an effort to win her back. The Greeks win with their Trojan Horse attack. This is the prequel to Odysseus' voyage home in The Odyssey.
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Austin
Pride and Prejudice
When Charles Bingley, a rich single man, and his prideful companion, Fitzwilliam Darcy, move to the Netherfield estate, the neighborhood residents are thrilled, especially Mrs. Bennet, who hopes to marry one of her five daughters to him. Bingley and the oldest Bennet daughter, Jane, soon form an attachment. Meanwhile, Darcy finds himself attracted to Elizabeth despite his objections to her family, though Elizabeth continues to despise him and is instead attracted to George Wickham, a handsome and personable militia officer. Mr. Bennet's cousin comes to town just as the Bingley family leaves suddenly, leaving Jane heartbroken, but he eventually returns and marries her. Darcy proposes to Elizabeth and she declines but eventually accepts when she realizes his geniality.
1984
George Orwell
1984
Winston Smith wrestles with oppression in Oceania, a place where the Party scrutinizes human actions with ever-watchful Big Brother. Defying a ban on individuality, Winston dares to express his thoughts in a diary and pursues a relationship with Julia. These criminal deeds bring Winston into the eye of the opposition, who then must reform the nonconformist. George Orwell's 1984 introduced the watchwords for life without freedom: BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU.
Ulysses
James Joyce
Ulysses
Joyce's Ulysses is a novel of eighteen "episodes," all set in Dublin, Ireland, between 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 am, June 16-17, 1904. The three main characters are a young school teacher and aspiring writer named Stephen Dedalus, a middle-aged Jewish advertising salesman named Leopold Bloom, and Leopold's wife, Molly.

Episodes: Bloom, Telemachus, Nestor, Proteus, Calypso, Lotus-eaters, Hades, Æolus, Lestrygonians, Scylla and Charybdis, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, Cyclops, Nausicaa, Oxen of the Sun, Circe, Eumaeus, Ithaca, Penelope
Romeo and Juliet
William Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliet
Two teenagers, Romeo and Juliet fall in love but are forbidden to marry. They both end up dying for their love by killing themselves (misunderstandings) in this Shakespearian tragedy.
The Merchant of Venice
William Shakespeare
the Merchant of Venice
Moneylender Shylock tries to recover his "pound of flesh" collateral for a loan.
Paradise Lost
John Milton
Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost is about Adam and Eve—how they came to be created and how they came to lose their place in the Garden of Eden, also called Paradise. It's the same story you find in the first pages of Genesis, expanded by Milton into a very long, detailed, narrative poem. It also includes the story of the origin of Satan.
The Canterbury Tales
Geoffery Chaucer
The Canterbury Tales
The Canterbury Tales consists of the stories related by the 29 pilgrims on their way to Saint Thomas Becket's shrine in Canterbury. There are:
The Knight's Tale
The Miller's Tale
The Reeve's Tale
The Cook's Tale
The Sergeants at Law's Tale
The Wife of Bath's Tale
The Summoner's Tale
The Clerk's Tale
The Merchant's Tale
The Squire's Tale
The Franklin's Tale
The Physician's Tale
The Pardoner's Tale
The Sea Captain's Tale
The Prioress's Tale
Sir Topas' Tale
The Monk's Tale
The Nun's Priest's Tale
The Second Nun's Tale
The Canon's Yeoman's Tale
The Manciple's Tale
The Parson's Tale
The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn
Mark Twain
The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn
Mischievous Huck Finn is unnerved when his father, Pap Finn reemerging after years away, kidnaps him in an attempt to take away a $600 inheritance from his late mother. Fearing for his life, Huck fakes his own death and escapes. He soon runs into his friend, Jim, a slave fleeing his master. Together, the pair embarks on a raft journey down the Mississippi River. After Jim gets sold back into slavery, Huck Finn, pretending to be Tom Sawyer and Tom Sawyer, pretending to be his own brother Sid, concoct an elaborate plan to free Jim (though the real Tom knew that Jim had been already set free).
The Scarlet Letter
Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Scarlet Letter
Adulteress Hester Prynne must wear a scarlet A to mark her shame. Her lover, Arthur Dimmesdale, remains unidentified and is wracked with guilt, while her husband, Roger Chillingworth, seeks revenge. The Scarlet Letter's symbolism helps create a powerful drama in Puritan Boston: a kiss, evil, sin, nature, the scarlet letter, and the punishing scaffold. Nathaniel Hawthorne's masterpiece is a classic example of the human conflict between emotion and intellect.
A Streetcar Named Desire
Tennessee Williams
A Streetcar Named Desire
Blanche DuBois, a former troubled school teacher, arrives to visit her sister, Mrs. Stella Kowalski, who lives in the French Quarter of New Orleans. She leaves small-town Mississippi and moves in with her sister, Stella Kowalski, and her husband, Stanley. Blanche's flirtatious Southern-belle presence causes problems for Stella and Stanley, who already have a volatile relationship, leading to even greater conflict in the Kowalski household.
Our Town
Thorton Wilder
Our Town
It is a play that begins on a "normal day" for a family. Each act fast forwards through time, first 6 years to when two of the children are getting married, then 9 years when the bride, Emily, is giving birth to her second child but dies in childbirth. Next, from the afterlife she is allowed to return to her life for one day to visit family but she returns early because she cannot bear knowing it is her last day with them. The theme is the appreciation of even "the normal days" of life.
The Adventures of Tom Sawer
Mark Twain
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
A cunning and naughty boy, Tom Sawyer, embarks on many adventures, such as:

Being infatuated with a new girl at school,

Tom and his friend Huckleberry Finn witness a murder in the cemetery.

Tom, Huck, and Joseph Harper run away from home and convince their families that they are dead, then surprise them at their own funerals.

Tom testifies against Injun Joe at the murder trial, and Injun Joe escapes.

Tom and Huck help to capture Injun Joe by trapping him inside a cave.
The Divine Comedy
Dante
The Divine Comedy
As Dante journeys through Purgatory, Hell, and Paradise, he experiences a classical interpretation of the soul's journey toward God. This work developed the ideas of "circles of hell" and ranked the sins according to their gravity.
Crime and Punishment
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Crime and Punishment
A young Russian student, Raskolnikov, believes himself to be an extraordinary man--one who has the 'right' to commit and crime. In order to prove his stupid theory correct, Raskolnikov 'needs' to murder the old pawnbroker and her innocent sister. Immediately following the crime, the guilt strikes and poor Raskolnikov becomes ill. Upon recovery, he finds an old school acquaintance, Razumihin, who might be the only non-male-jerk of the whole story. This is an oddly repetitive cycle of crime and weak dominated women.
The Red Badge of Courage
Stephen Crane
The Red Badge of Courage
This book is about the American Civil War and is one of the greatest depictions of battle. Henry signs up for the army because he thinks it would be cool to be a hero. His mom doesn't want him to be in the army. Originally he is a bit of a wimp and runs away during his first battle. During his second battle he gets wounded (from a silly accident) but he makes up a battle wound story and afterward is much more confident, hence the title, the Red Badge of Courage.
Candide
Voltaire
Candide
Candide is a very innocent young man living in the castle of the Baron Thunder-ten-tronckh in Westphalia. He gets kicked out because he is suspected of romancing the Baron's daughter, Cunégonde. Candide goes through many adventures. Some of them are funny, some are sad, and some are eerie. His eyes open to reality. He sees that everything does not happen for the best as the philosophers and Dr. Pangloss had told him in the Baron's castle. It is a happy ending novel and the characters know that the only way to happiness is honesty and hard work, not vague philosophy.
Billy Budd: Foretopman
Herman Melville
Billy Budd
Aboard the Bellipotent, Billy assumes the duties of foretopman. He quickly endears himself to his mates and the officers under whom he serves. He faces troubles with the crew and the higher-ups on the ship. Billy is accused of mutiny, and when he is confronted about it, he vents his feelings by killing his accusers. He is tried, accused, and hanged. The ship faces an England at war and Billy's spirit lives on.
Les Misérables
Victor Hugo
Les Misérables
After 19 years as a prisoner, Jean Valjean is freed by Javert, the officer in charge of the prison workforce. Valjean promptly breaks parole but later uses money from stolen silver to reinvent himself as a mayor and factory owner. Javert vows to bring Valjean back to prison. Eight years later, Valjean becomes the guardian of a child named Cosette after her mother's death, and sticks around until his death at the end, protecting her and helping her to marry Marius.
Anna Karenina
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina
In 1874, in the Imperial Russia, the aristocratic Anna Karenina travels from Saint Petersburg to Moscow to save the marriage of her brother Prince Oblonsky, who had had a love affair with his housemaid. Anna Karenina has a cold marriage with her husband, Count Alexei Karenin, and they have a son. Anna meets the cavalry officer Count Vronsky at the train station and they feel attracted by each other. Soon she learns that Vronsky will propose to Kitty, who is the younger sister of her sister-in-law Dolly. Anna satisfactorily resolves the infidelity case of her brother and Kitty invites her to stay for the ball. However, Anna Karenina and Vronsky dance in the ball, calling the attention of the conservative society. Soon they have a love affair that will lead Anna Karenina to a tragic fate.
A Midsummer Night's Dream
William Shakespeare
A Midsummer Night's Dream
It portrays the adventures of four young lovers and a group of amateur actors, their interactions with woodland fairies and a duke and duchess. Taking place in a mythical Athens and an enchanted forest, there is a handsome fairy king, a misguided parent, star-crossed lovers, a weaver who's transformed into a half-donkey, wood sprites and elves.
Pygmalion
George Bernard Shaw
Pygmalion
Pygmalion is a problem play that examines a social issue. Shaw deals here with the assumptions of social superiority and inferiority that underlie the class system. The phonetics professor Henry Higgins undertakes the transformation of Eliza Doolittle by teaching her to speak like a lady. She is successful in terms of pronunciation but not in terms of phrases. She struggles throughout the play to liberate herself from her professor's tyranny.
Julius Caesar
William Shakespeare
Julius Caesar
Brutus and others kill Caesar to prevent him from becoming king.
War and Peace
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace
War and Peace starts in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1805. Napoleon has conquered much of Europe and troops are being mobilized to defend Russia. The characters Andrew, Nicholas, and Pierre go in and out of battles and love triangles.
The Three Musketeers
Alexandre Dumas
The Three Musketeers
D'Artagnan leaves to Paris with the hope of joining the king's musketeers with a letter recommending him from his father. Unfortunately on his way to Paris he ends up in a duel with one of the Cardinal's guards (the nemesis of the Musketeers) who steals the letter. He and Athos, Aramis and Pathos end up on many cape and sword adventures. His love interest is Lady de Winter, who is marked by a fleur de lis tattoo on her shoulder and ends up being a Cardinalist agent.
A Farewell to Arms
Ernest Hemingway
A Farewell to Arms
The novel opens with World War I raging all over Europe. A young American student, studying architecture in Italy, offers his services to the Italian army. In Gorizia, he is wounded in the knee and is sent to recuperate in a hospital in Milan. He falls in love with an English nurse, Catherine Barkley, lives with her, and she becomes pregnant. He returns to the front in Gorizia and is caught in the Italian retreat. In order to save his life, he deserts his post and goes away to a hospital in Milan to take Catherine and go some place where they can start life anew. They go to Switzerland but cannot live happily, for a fresh tragedy awaits them. Their eagerly awaited son is stillborn and Catherine who can never have a normal delivery, dies after a Caesarian operation.
Vanity Fair
William Thackeray
Vanity Fair
Social satire. It follows the lives of two women, Becky Sharp and Amelia Sedley, amid their friends and family.
To Kill a Mockingbird
Harper Lee
To Kill a Mockingbird
Harper Lee uses memorable characters to explore civil rights and racism in the segregated Southern United States of the 1930s. Told through the eyes of Scout Finch, you learn about her father Atticus Finch, an attorney who hopelessly strives to prove the innocence of a black man unjustly accused of rape; and about Boo Radley, a mysterious neighbor who saves Scout and her brother Jem from being killed.
For Whom the Bell Tolls
Ernest Hemingway
For Whom the Bell Tolls
For Whom the Bell Tolls chronicles the experiences of American college professor Robert Jordan, who has volunteered to fight for the Loyalist cause in the Spanish Civil War. His initial idealism is quickly tempered by the realities of war. Yet his courage enables him to remain devoted to the cause, even as he faces death. Hemingway's compassionate and authentic portrait of his characters as they struggle to retain their idealistic beliefs has helped earn the novel its reputation as one of Hemingway's finest.
The Grapes of Wrath
John Steinbeck
The Grapes of Wrath
John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, Tom Joad and his family are forced from their farm in the Depression-era Oklahoma Dust Bowl and set out for California along with thousands of others in search of jobs, land, and hope for a brighter future. Considered John Steinbeck's masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath is a story of human unity and love as well as the need for cooperative rather than individualistic ideals during hard times. The most famous image in The Grapes of Wrath is the novel's final one, in which Rose of Sharon Joad, whose baby was recently stillborn, breast-feeds a sickly, starving man on the floor of an old barn.
Lolita
Vladimir Nabokov
Lolita
Urbane professor Humbert Humbert marries a New England widow to be near her nymphet daughter.
A Tale of Two Cities
Charles Dickens
A tale of two cities
Famous first line: "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times"
Little Women
Louisa May Alcott
Little Women
Jo, Meg, Beth, and Amy March are four sisters living with their mother in New England. Their father is away serving as a chaplain in the Civil War, and the sisters struggle to support themselves and keep their household running despite the fact that the family recently lost its fortune. In the process, they become close friends with their wealthy neighbor, Theodore Laurence, known as "Laurie." As the girls grow older, each faces her own personal demons and moral challenges.
As You Like It
William Shakespeare
As You Like It
Sir Rowland de Boys has recently died, leaving behind sons Oliver and Orlando. Since Oliver's the eldest son, he's inherited just about everything. This includes the responsibility of making sure his little brother finishes school and continues to live the kind of lifestyle he's become accustomed to as the son of a nobleman. Oliver treats Orlando like a servant. Orlando deals with his brother treating him poorly, falling in love with Rosalind, and running away to the Forest of Arden. In the end, everyone falls in love in the forest and they all live happily ever after.
The Wasteland
T S Eliot
The Wasteland
Sections of poetry that shift between times, very dreary. The sections include: The Burial of the Dead, A Game of Chess, The Fire Sermon, Death by Water, and What the Thunder Said. Most of the sections relate to stories of death, and they describe gray, empty landscapes. In the end, he uses the word Shantih, which means "the peace that passeth all understanding." This makes us think that he may see some hope for the world.
Aeneid
Virgil
Aeneid
After the destruction of Troy, the Trojan prince Aeneas leads a small band of survivors in search of a new home in Italy. Unfortunately, as they sail on their way, they get spotted by the goddess Juno. Juno hates the Trojans because of an old grudge, and because they are destined to become the Romans, who will destroy Carthage, her favorite city. Conspiring with the god of the winds, Juno whips up a storm, forcing the Trojans to take refuge in Carthage. The story follows the tribulations of Aeneas who, in the end, kills his foe, Turnus.
Odyssey
Homer
Odyssey
The epic story of Odysseus and his voyage home to his wife and estate. His wife spends the time resisting numerous suitors. Some of his challenges include: sirens,
Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Heart of Darkness
Heart of Darkness follows one man's nightmarish journey into the interior of Africa. Aboard a British ship called the Nellie, three men listen to a man named Marlow recount his journey into Africa as an agent for the Company, a Belgian ivory trading firm. Along the way, he witnesses brutality and hate between colonizers and the native African people, becomes entangled in a power struggle within the Company, and finally learns the truth about the mysterious Kurtz, a mad agent who has become both a god and a prisoner of the "native Africans." After "rescuing" Kurtz from the native African people, Marlow watches in horror as Kurtz succumbs to madness, disease, and finally death. In the end, Marlow decides to support Kurtz rather than his company. The novel closes with Marlow's guilt-ridden visit to Kurtz's fiancée to return the man's personal letters.
Pilgrim's Progress
John Bunyan
Pilgrim's Progress
The story of John Bunyan's "pilgrim" takes place in the narrator's dream from a jail cell, and begins in the City of Destruction. From here, convinced that the city is going to live up to its name and be destroyed for its sinfulness, our pilgrim, Christian, decides to flee at the very helpful suggestion of a man named Evangelist. Christian continues on the road indicated by Evangelist toward the "little Wicket Gate" where his real journey toward the Celestial City will begin, and he is led astray. He eventually makes it and is given a scroll, but he falls asleep and loses the scroll. On his way back, he faces many trials. Much of this book is an allegory (with characters having names like hopeful, faithful, and diffidence) as well as a dream.
David Copperfield
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield
The novel traces the life of David Copperfield from the time of his birth to his mature manhood, when he is married and familiar with the vicissitudes of life. His early years are enjoyable with his mother — who was widowed shortly before his birth — and with her servant, Peggotty. Life is happy for David until his mother decides to marry Mr. Murdstone; afterward, life becomes unbearable for David. He is soon sent to a miserable school where he becomes friendly with James Steerforth, a fellow student. Throughout his life, David faces his mother's death, his travels, and falling in love with Dora.
One Hundred Years of Solitude
Gabriel García Márques
One Hundred Years of Solitude
Retelling of stories of the Buen Dia family
Antigone
Sophocles
Antigone
Antigone picks up in the same place that Oedipus at Colonus leaves off. Oedipus has just passed away in Colonus, and Antigone and her sister decide to return to Thebes with the intention of helping their brothers, Eteocles and Polyneices, avoid a prophecy that predicts they will kill each other in a battle for the throne of Thebes. But upon her arrival in Thebes, Antigone learns that both of her brothers are dead. Eteocles has been given a proper burial, but Creon, Antigone's uncle who has inherited the throne, has issued a royal edict banning the burial of Polyneices, who he believes was a traitor. Antigone defies the law, buries her brother, and is caught. When Creon locks her away in prison, she kills herself. Meanwhile, not realizing Antigone has taken her own life, the blind prophet Teiresias, Creon's son and Antigone's fiancé Haemon, and the Chorus plead with Creon to release her. Creon finally relents, but in an instance of too-late-timing, finds her dead in her jail cell. Out of despair, Haemon and Creon's wife have by now also killed themselves, and Creon is left in distress and sorrow.
Faust
John Wolfgang Goethe
Faust
A tragic play in two parts usually known in English as Faust, Part One and Faust, Part Two. Although rarely staged in its entirety, it is the play with the largest audience numbers on German-language stages. Faust is Goethe's magnum opus and considered by many to be one of the greatest works of German literature. Part one follows Mephistopheles making bets with God and the Devil that revolve around Faust. Part Two focuses on Faust waking in a field of fairies to initiate a new cycle of adventures and purpose
The Count of Monte Cristo
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo
Edmond Dantès, a handsome, promising young sailor, skillfully docks the three-masted French ship, the Pharaon, in Marseilles after its captain died en route home. As a reward, Dantès is promised a captainship, but before he can claim his new post and be married to his fiancée, Mercédès', a conspiracy of four jealous and unsavory men arrange for him to be seized and secretly imprisoned in solitary confinement in the infamous Chateau d'If, a prison from which no one has ever escaped. He eventually digs himself out and finds treasure. Re-emerging into society as the Count of Monte Cristo, he methodically seeks his revenge and sails happily away, never to be seen again.
A Doll's House
Henrik Ibsen
Robinson Crusoe
Daniel Defoe
Robinson Crusoe
Robinson Crusoe, as a young and impulsive wanderer, defied his parents and went to sea. He was involved in a series of violent storms at sea and was warned by the captain that he should not be a seafaring man. Ashamed to go home, Crusoe boarded another ship and returned from a successful trip to Africa. Taking off again, Crusoe met with bad luck and was taken prisoner in Sallee. His captors sent Crusoe out to fish, and he used this to his advantage and escaped, along with a slave. He became a craftsman and built a boat to return to England where hefound that in his absence he had become a wealthy man. After going to Lisbon to handle some of his affairs, Crusoe began an overland journey back to England. Crusoe and his company encountered many hardships in crossing the mountains, but they finally arrived safely in England. Crusoe sold his plantation in Brazil for a good price, married, and had three children. Finally, however, he was persuaded to go on yet another voyage, and he visited his old island, where there were promises of new adventures to be found in a later account.
Animal Farm
George Orwell
Animal Farm
A political allegory of the Russian Revolution,

Old Major, a pig, describes a dream he had about a world where all animals live free from the tyranny of their human masters.

Two pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, chase the human Jones off Manor farm, and the 7 rules of Animalism are established.

The Seven Commandments are reduced to a single law: "All Animals Are Equal / But Some Are More Equal Than Others."
The Call of the Wild
Jack London
The Call of the Wild
Buck, a physically impressive dog, is living the good life in California when he gets stolen and put into dog slavery and works as a sled dog.

Buck eventually fights with temptation: stay with Thornton, a kind man who saved him from a sled accident, or kill things? Be civilized, or be wild?
Much Ado About Nothing
William Shakespeare
The Glass Menagerie
Tennessee Williams
The Glass Menagerie
The drama is narrated by Tom Wingfield, who supports his mother Amanda and his crippled sister Laura (who takes refuge from reality in her glass animals).

Tom brings Jim O'Connor to the house as a gentleman caller for Laura. While O'Connor is there, the horn on Laura's glass unicorn breaks, bringing her into reality, until O'Connor tells the family that he is already engaged. Laura returns to her fantasy world, while Tom abandons the family after fighting with Amanda.
The Crucible
Arthur Miller
The Crucible
Based on Salem Witch Trials

After married man John Proctor decides to break off his affair with his young lover, Abigail Williams , she leads other local girls in an occult rite to wish death upon his wife, Elizabeth. When the ritual is discovered, the girls are brought to trial. Accusations begin to fly, and a literal witch hunt gets underway. Before long, Elizabeth is suspected of witchcraft, and John's attempt to defend her only makes matters worse.
Brave New World
Aldous Huxley
Brave New World
Dystopian future society where genes are altered to force you into a social class (Children are grown and not born). Bernard Marx travels to the Savage Civilization, and brings back John who comes from the unsocialized people but also unaltered genes. He commits suicide because he cannot adjust to society and he understands freedom and that suffering is human.
Beowulf
unknown
Beowulf
In Anglo-Saxon England, a monster named Grendel terrorizes the Danish people until a Geat hero, Beowulf, comes to their rescue. Beowulf is a figure of strength, and he saves the Geats as well as defeating Grendel's mother who seeks revenge. Seemingly unbeatable, Beowulf is praised and showered with gifts. He eventually meets his match when he takes on a Dragon that is slaughtering the Geats. He wins the battle but is mortally wounded. After Beowulf's death, the Geats build an enormous funeral pyre for him, heaped with treasures. Once the pyre has burned down, they spend ten days building an enormous barrow (a large mound of earth filled with treasure) as a monument to their lost king.
The Sun Also Rises
Ernest Hemingway
The Sun Also Rises
Jake Barnes and his expatriate friends live in post-WW1-Paris.There, they occasionally work, but spend most of their time partying, drinking, and arguing. From Jake's perspective, we meet the cast of characters that populates his story: Robert Cohn and Lady Brett Ashley. Although Jake and Brett are actually in love, they aren't together, presumably because a mysterious war wound has rendered Jake impotent, leading Brett to go away with Robert. Brett begins an affair with a talented young man, Romero, who Robert consequently beats to a pulp. As all the craziness dies down, Jake leaves to San Sebastian and Brett to Madrid. Brett sends Jake telegrams, but when he goes to visit her, they both decide that they cannot be together despite their love for each other.
The Jungle
Upton Sinclair
The Jungle
Exposes the meat industry. Lead to the Pure Food and drug Act.
Twelth Night
William Shakespeare
Great Expectations
Charles Dickens
Great Expectations
Pip recounts his life story from his childhood to how he matures and grows up to becoming a young man. He falls in love with a wealthy but heartless girl named Estella. From that moment on, everything Pip does in his life is for Estella and only her.
Pip even receives a fortune from a secret benefactor to pursue an education and he does this along with obtaining wealth, success and high social class in the hopes of becoming worthy in the eyes of his beloved Estella.

Magwitch- a former convict
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Man, kills albatross, bad luck
Oliver Twist
Charles Dickens
Oliver Twist
A young boy growing up in a private juvenile home because his mother died in a workhouse. He is treated poorly and escapes, only to join a band of boys who steal for a living, led by Mr. Fagan. Oliver is caught when robbing a house with Sikes, and the owners of the home take him in. Fagin and a mysterious man named Monks are set on recapturing Oliver. It is revealed that Monks is Oliver's half brother. Their father, Mr. Leeford, was unhappily married to a wealthy woman and had an affair with Oliver's mother, Agnes Fleming. Monks has been pursuing Oliver all along in the hopes of ensuring that his half-brother is deprived of his share of the family inheritance. Mr. Brownlow forces Monks to sign over Oliver's share to Oliver. Moreover, it is discovered that Rose is Agnes's younger sister, hence Oliver's aunt. Fagin is hung for his crimes. Finally, Mr. Brownlow adopts Oliver, and they and the Maylies retire to a blissful existence in the countryside.
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Uncle Tom's Cabin
The Shelby family is forced to sell two of their slaves because of economic troubles; Uncle Tom and Harry.
Rip van Winkle
Washington Irving
Rip Van Winkle
A man, Rip Van Winkle, falls asleep in pre-revolutionary America and wakes up after the Revolutionary War and wakes up to experience the new world.
The Catcher in the Rye
J D Salinger
The Catcher in the Rye
A boy named Holden Cauldfield gets expelled from school and he wanders around New York City. Stuggles with the idea of adulthood. (Ducks migration stuff)
Waiting for Godot
Samuel Beckett
Death of a Salesman
Arthur Miller
Death of a Salesman
This play questions American values of success:

Willy Loman is a failed salesman whose firm fires him after 34 years. He desperately wants his sons Biff and Happy to succeed despite his own failures.

Told in a series of flashbacks and shows Biff's moment of hopelessness when he catches his father Willy cheating on his mother, Linda.

Willy later commits suicide in an attempt to leave Biff with insurance money.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Lewis Carroll
Long Day's Journey Into Night
Eugene O'Neill
All the King's Men
Robert Penn Warren
Things Fall Apart
Chinua Achebe
Slaughterhouse Five
Kurt Vonnegut
The Charge of the Light Brigade
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Merry Wives of Windsor
William Shakespeare
The Importance of Being Ernest
Oscar Wilde
The Magic Mountain
Thomas Mann
Invisible Man
Ralph Ellison
The Taming of the Shrew
William Shakespeare
The taming of the shrew
Lucentio, a well-heeled, high-energy young man from Pisa has arrived in Padua with plans to study the "happiness branch of philosophy." His more pragmatic servant, Tranio, suggests he "study what you most like." Baptista Minola has two daughters, Katherine and Bianca, Bianca the younger. Young men pay a lot of attention to Bianca. Katherine is extraordinarily jealous.
Eugene Onegin
Aleksander Pushkin
Sense and Sensibility
Jane Austin
Sense and Sensibility
When Elinor Dashwood's father dies, her family's finances are crippled. After the Dashwoods move to a cottage in Devonshire, Elinor's sister Marianne is torn between the handsome John Willoughby and the older Colonel Brandon. Meanwhile, Elinor's romantic hopes with Edward Ferrars are hindered due to his prior engagement.
The Brothers Karamazov
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Inferno
Dante
The Stranger
Albert Camus
Catch-22
Joseph Heller
A Raisin in the Sun
Lorraine Hansberry
A Raisin in the Sun
Inspired by the author's father's 1940 court fight against racist housing laws.

Follows the Younger family, who attempts to move into an all-white Chicago suburb but are confronted by discrimination.

The first play by an African-American woman to be performed on Broadway.

Title comes from Langston Hughes's poem "Harlem" ("A Dream Deferred").
Wuthering Heights
Follows the life of Heathcliff, a mysterious gypsy-like person, from childhood (about seven years old) to his death in his late thirties. Heathcliff rises in his adopted family and then is reduced to the status of a servant, running away when the young woman he loves decides to marry another. He returns later, rich and educated, and sets about gaining his revenge on the two families that he believed ruined his life.
Wuthering Heights
Emily Brontë
Wuthering Heights
Emily Brontë
The Sound and the Fury
William Faulkner
Orestia
Aeschylus
Decameron
Giovanni Boccaccio
The Raven
Edgar Allen Poe
The Raven
A man is sitting in his room, half reading, half falling asleep, and trying to forget his lost love, Lenore. Suddenly, he hears someone (or something) knocking at his chamber door.
Ivanhoe
Sir Walter Scott
Ivanhoe
The story of one of the remaining Saxon noble families at a time when the nobility in England was overwhelmingly Norman. It follows the Saxon protagonist, Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe, who is out of favour with his father for his allegiance to the Norman king Richard the Lionheart.
Was written and published during a period of increasing struggle for the emancipation of the Jews in England, and there are frequent references to injustices against them.
Ivanhoe
Sir Walter Scott
The House of Seven Gables
Nathaniel Hawthorne
The House of Seven Gables
Follows a New England family and their ancestral home. Explores themes of guilt, retribution, and atonement and colors the tale with suggestions of the supernatural and witchcraft.
My Ántonia
Tells the stories of an orphaned boy from Virginia named Jim Burden, and the elder daughter in a family of Bohemian immigrants, Ántonia Shimerda, who are each brought to be pioneers in Nebraska towards the end of the 19th century, as children. Both the pioneers who first break the prairie sod for farming, as well as of the harsh but fertile land itself, feature in this American novel. The first year in the very new place leaves strong impressions in both children, affecting them lifelong.
My Ántonia
Willa Cather
Absalom, Absalom
William Faulkner
Absalom, Absalom
In 1833, a wild and imposing man, Thomas Sutpen comes to Jefferson, Mississippi, with a group of slaves. He swindles land from an Indian tribe and runs a cotton plantation. Sutpen has a son and a daughter, Henry and Judith, who grow up in a life of uncultivated ease in the northern Mississippi countryside. Henry goes to college and meets a sophisticated fellow student named Charles Bon, whom he befriends and brings home for Christmas. Charles meets Judith, they get engaged, but in a plot twist Charles is actually her half brother from her father's previous marriage, which he cut off when he discovered that his wife had negro blood. After many intricacies most male characters end up dying throughout the novel which takes place before, during, and after the Civil War.