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Semester 2 English Exam Study Guide

Final exam includes the following: -R&J vocabulary (15q/1pt) -TKaM vocabulary (15q/1pt) -Literary/dramatic terms (20q/1pt) -R&J multiple choice (40q/2pt) -TKaM multiple choice (20q/1pt) -R&J character descriptions (1q/50pt) -TKaM character descriptions -Essay (comparing the two novels) ESJ/EHS, Ms. Wallis, English 8. Valid 2011-2012 year.
STUDY
PLAY
adversary
an enemy, opponent
languish
To become weak
disposition
a person's usual mood; temperament
reverence
deep respect
wanton
reckless, loose in morals
confound
to confuse and frustrate
tedious
tiresome because of length or dullness
forsworn
rejected or renounced under oath
inundate
to flood, overflow; to overwhelm by numbers or size
entreat
to beg, implore, ask earnestly
beguile
to deceive, to mislead, to persuade with charm
cunning
sly, clever, deceitful
minstrel
a medieval musician who sang and recited poetry
pestilent
destructive to life, deadly, poisonous
inexorable
relentless; unyielding
descry
to discriminate or discern
apothecary
druggist; pharmacist
presage
a sign or feeling concerning some future event; omen; foreboding
dirge
funeral song
haste
swiftness of motion; speed
slander
to speak badly about someone publicly; to defame; to spread malicious rumor
sullen
silent or brooding because of ill humor, anger, or resentment; slow moving, sluggish
lour
to frown, scowl, or look sullen; glower; to look negatively upon
abhor
to regard with horror or loathing; to hate deeply
inauspicious
unfavorable, unlucky, suggesting bad luck for the future
assuage
provide physical relief, as from pain
chattel
an item of personal, movable property; slave
taciturn
habitually silent or quiet, inclined to talk very little
vapid
dull, uninteresting, tiresome; lacking in sharpness, flavor, liveliness, or force
malevolent
spiteful, showing ill will
illicit
illegal
amiable
friendly
auspicious
favorable
inquisitive
curious; asking lots of questions
libel
written untruths that are harmful to someone's reputation
diversion
a distraction; an amusement; an attention getter
inordinate
far too great, exceeding reasonable limits, excessive
obstreperous
noisy; unruly, disorderly
interdict
a law or requirement
palliate
to make less serious; ease
propensity
a natural inclination or predilection toward
frivolous
Lacking in seriousness or importance
impudent
disrespectful, characterized by improper bold behavior
sordid
wretchedly poor; run-down; mean or selfish
acquiescence
agreement or consent by silence or without objection
umbrage
offense, resentment
passé
out of fashion
provocation
something that stirs up anger or excitement
formidable
menacing, causing fear or awe
prerogative
a requirement for something else to happen
Allusion
a reference to another work of literature, person, or event
Antagonist
A character or force in conflict with the main character
Direct Characterization
the writer specifically states what a character is like
Indirect Characterization
the character is revealed through their personality, appearance, words, actions, and effect on others
Internal Conflict
A struggle within a single character, often emotional.
External Conflict
a struggle between a character and an outside force
Dialect
the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people
Diction
the manner in which something is expressed in words
Figurative Language
writing or speech that is not meant to be taken literally
Foreshadowing
the use of hints and clues to suggest what will happen later in a plot
Imagery
language that appeals to the senses
Dramatic Irony
irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
Situational Irony
an outcome that turns out to be very different from what was expected
Verbal Irony
occurs when what is said contradicts what is meant or thought
Metaphor
comparison not using like or as
Mood
the overall emotion created by a work of literature
Atmosphere
The emotional tone or background that surrounds a scene
Narrator
The person telling the story
Personification
giving human qualities to animals or objects
Plot
the sequence of events in a story
Exposition
scenes that introduce the characters, setting, and basic situation
Inciting Incident
event that introduces the central conflict
Climax
Most exciting moment of the story; turning point
Resolution
the falling action of a narrative; the events following the climax
Denouement
resolution
Prose
the ordinary form of written language
Setting
where and when the story takes place
Simile
comparison using like or as
Suspense
Uncertainty or anxiety the reader feels about what is going to happen next in a story
Symbol
an item which represents something else
Theme
central idea of a work of literature
Tone
the author's attitude toward the subject
Act
a subdivision of a play
Alliteration
repetition of initial consonant sounds
Analogy
a comparison of two things that are similar in some way
Aside
Lines supposedly not heard by others on the stage and intended only for the audience.
Comedy
light and humorous drama with a happy ending
Comic Relief
A humorous scene or speech intended to lighten the mood
Foil
a character whose personality and attitude contrast sharply with those of another
Groundlings
those who purchased the standing room only tickets to an Elizabethan play; unruly section of a Shakespearean audience
Hamartia
the tragic flaw of a hero that leads to his or her downfall
Hubris
excessive pride
Iambic Pentameter
a poetic meter that is made up of 5 stressed syllables each followed by an unstressed syllable
Monologue
long speech by one person
Oxymoron
conjoining contradictory terms (as in 'deafening silence')
Prologue
an introduction to a play
Pun
a humorous play on words
Satire
witty language used to convey insults or scorn
Scene
a division of an act in a play
Soliloquy
speech to oneself
Sonnet
14 line poem
Tragedy
A serious form of drama dealing with the downfall of a heroic or noble character
Tragic Hero
the protagonist of a tragedy