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17 terms

Word Wall Quiz

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superfluous
being more than is sufficient or required; excessive.
unnecessary or needless.
discursive
passing aimlessly from one subject to another; digressive; rambling.
proceeding by reasoning or argument rather than intuition.
orgy
wild, drunken or licentious festivity or revelry.
any actions or proceedings marked by unbridled indulgence of passions
enervate
to deprive of force or strength; destroy the vigor of; weaken
assuage
to make milder or less severe; relieve; ease; mitigate: to assuage one's grief; to assuage one's pain.
to appease; satisfy; allay; relieve: to assuage one's hunger.
to soothe, calm, or mollify: to assuage his fears; to assuage her anger.
prostitute
to offer (oneself or another) in sexual intercourse for money
to offer (a person, esp oneself, or a person's talent) for unworthy purposes
apropos
fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.
litotes
understatement for rhetorical effect, esp when achieved by using negation with a term in place of using an antonym of that term
guile
insidious cunning in attaining a goal; crafty or artful deception; duplicity, trickery, fraud
incognito
having one's identity concealed, as under an assumed name, especially to avoid notice or formal attentions.
didactic
intended for instruction; instructive: didactic poetry.
inclined to teach or lecture others too much: a boring, didactic speaker.
teaching or intending to teach a moral lesson.
tumultuous
marked by disturbance and uproar: a tumultuous celebration.
raising a great clatter and commotion; disorderly or noisy: a tumultuous crowd of students.
highly agitated, as the mind or emotions; distraught; turbulent.
chicanery
trickery or deception by quibbling or sophistry: He resorted to the worst flattery and chicanery to win the job.
a quibble or subterfuge used to trick, deceive, or evade.
fraud, deception
anastrophe
inversion of the usual order of words.
circumlocution
a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the use of more words than necessary to express an idea.
tmesis
the interpolation of one or more words between the parts of a compound word, "as be thou ware for beware"
behoove
to be necessary or proper for, as for moral or ethical considerations; be incumbent on: It behooves the court to weigh evidence impartially.
to be worthwhile to, as for personal profit or advantage