American Lit. Exam 1

Terms in this set (103)

-There are many versions of this poem
-First written in 1859, then sent in a letter to her sister-in-law in 1861 for her to discuss and critique it.
-The strangeness of the first stanza is not followed up by the second. They don't really go together. You really don't need a second stanza, the first is better alone - a paraphrase of Sue Dickinson's critique of the poem
-Referring to meek members of resurrection lying safe in chambers (those who inherit earth)
-Ghostly shimmer and conventional nature
-Emily rewrites the second stanza
-Meek members of resurrection are people who have died and now lie in chambers
-Is this a pious poem? Are these people who expect to be resurrected?
-It's impossible that a rafter made of satin could hold up a roof made of stone, that coffin would collapse. There's nothing "safe" about it.
-Dickinson believes that the dead wait in vain to be resurrected. She's "telling it slant" in this poem
-The new second stanza she writes is more abstract, cosmic, strange, and weird than the first version of that stanza.
-The words are suggesting spheres around the dead who lie in boxes
-"Rafter of satin supporting a roof of stone"
-Collapsable box called safe (truth of circumstance waiting in vain)
-Death turned into friend
-It's ironic that these grand spheres of life are outside of the members of the resurrection. Much time goes by and they are still just lying there.
-Images in the second stanza (abstract and less conventional) echo the images in the second part of another of Dickinson's poems, "I'm ceded - I've stopped being Theirs"
-Cosmic spheres of life and history
-Expressive (writer)
-Meditative
-Language exercise
-Ambiguos referents
-Private written voice
-Unconventional images
-Emotional complexity
-Leaps of idea, breaks of syntax; applicability
- Young girls conflicted loyalties to her conception of herself in nature and to the world of men she will soon encounter
-Explores difference between the city and countryside
-Contrast between intuitive knowledge of nature and familiarity with a place vs the power and knowledge of vision (Major theme)
-Contrast between whistles, adjectives show tension in Sylvia's relationship with the boy
-She wants to hide just like the cow was hiding from her
-Stranger becomes friends with girl
- His good qualities are mirrored by how he speaks
-Appealing: wealth (offers money), confidence, purpose, power, determination, wordiness
-Seduced by the spirit of adventure
-His speech is fast, aggressive, energetic while Sylvia's voice is slower; they have different relationships to time.
-To give up location of Heron is to give up herself

-DID SHE MAKE THE WRITE CHOICE
-She's pale, so is the white heron, at odds with self, rare birds in setting don't take out
-Length of sentence, wording
-Did not make bad dec. "there are treasures here in this wood" compensation for turning down money
-"whatever treasures were lost to her": monetary vs long term spiritual connection to environment, different levels of transaction- material vs spiritual (something else in story) linking sylvie and grotesque language of what really matters, she found herself
-Formally: scared of hunter by whistle and gun, end misses it (shift in character doubting if she made the right choice- repetition of dude but her response is different)
-Punctation at end, end with command, voice is different, apostrophe to loyalty (invocation creates gravity of lost, protesting too much)
-Third person, real shift
-Clear that she wants sylvia to stay true to forest (goddess of woods, refers to name, doesn't talk to anyone)
-Bossy narrator at top of tree and end
-Gain companionship (if followed man, greedy and materialistic love "could have served and followed him like a dog loves" loyalty of women and status, not qual companion)
-Branches and pine trees holding her up, she is the dependent one
-Give up nature, give up chastity, money taken then loss of innocence and virtue
-Sexuality and loss of innocence by gun
-Awakening of wide world of womenhood
-Assimlated self to whistle and gun and ssnse of loss of innocence as she no longer fears it
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