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46 terms

Out of the Dust

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alliteration
This is the repetition of beginning sounds in words often found in poetry. (Ex. Chickity China, the Chinese chicken...)
onomatopoeia
The use of words that imitate the sound they denote(make).
metaphor
A comparison between two unlike things without using the words "like" or "as."
simile
A comparison between two unlike things using "like" or "as."
cliche
These are metaphors and similes that have been overused and are no longer fresh.
personification
This is the act of giving human "like" qualities/characteristics to nonliving things.
rhyme
These are words with the same ending sounds (spelling is moot).
perfect rhyme
This is rhyme that involves words that sound exactly the same (ex: love, dove).
imperfect rhyme
This is rhyme that involves words that sound similar, but are not exactly the same.
end rhyme
This is what we call rhyme that occurs at the end of two or more lines of poetry.
internal rhyme
This is what we call rhyme between words that occurs within a single line of poetry.
rhyme scheme
The pattern of end rhymes in a poem. Limericks are AABBA.
meter
The rhythm or beat in a line of poetry.
hyperbole
This is an over exaggeration.
irony
This is the use of words that convey an outcome that is the opposite of its literal meaning
narrative poem
a poem that tells a story
ballad
This is a type of poem that is meant to be sung and is both lyric and narrative in nature.
blank verse
This is a type of poem that has unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter).
cinquain
This is a five line poem. Line one is the title/topic, line two is two adjectives describing the title, line three is three verbs, line four is a four word sentence about the topic, and line five renames the title/topic.
free verse
Poetry that does not have a regular meter or rhyme scheme.
haiku
A form of Japanese poetry with 17 syllables in three unrhymed lines. This style of poetry was originally love letters or about nature.
limerick
A five line poem in which lines 1, 2 and 5 rhyme and lines 3 and 4 rhyme.
sonnet
This poem style was written by William Shakespeare. It consisted of 14 lines and 10 syllables per-line with a fixed rhyme scheme.
dramatic
Poetry that is intended to be performed rather than read.
anthology
This is a collection of selected literary passages that have a common bond between them.
prose
Margin-to-margin writing that uses conventional (standard) English convention to communicate ideas.
poetry
Writing that plays with space and language to creatively communicate ideas.
stanza
This is a "paragraph" in poetry.
couplet
2-line stanza
triplet
3-line stanza
quatrain
4-line stanza
sestet
6-line stanza
septet
7-line stanza
octave
8-line stanza
assonance
The repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words.
repetition
The repetition of sounds, words, or ideas for effect and emphasis.
epic
This is a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds.
symbol
Something visible that by association or convention represents something else that is invisible.
consonance
The repetition of consonants (or consonant patterns) especially at the ends of words.
iambic pentameter
A common meter in poetry consisting of an unrhymed line with five feet or accents, each foot containing an unaccented syllable and an accented syllable.
oxymoron
Conjoining contradictory terms (as in 'deafening silence').
imagery
Words or phrases that appeal to the senses and conjure up mental images.
paradox
an extended oxymoron-"Good men must not obey the laws too well" Emerson
form
the structure or shape of written work.
parallelism
the repetition of words, phrases, or sentences; it adds rhythm and balance to writing.
refrain
the repetition for a word, phrase, or lines at regular intervals.